Any Denver E Doggys? [Archive] - Honda Element Owners Club Forum

: Any Denver E Doggys?


DOGBOX
03-12-2005, 08:56 PM
There is a potential job for me in Denver. I've never been, and folks I know have given mixed reviews. Specifically, I would be interested in buying a home with a good size yard and preferably live in a dog-friendly neighborhood--like a place wiith a cool doggy park or some such thing. Would that be like outrageously expensive or average? Oh, and what's average for the price of a home (not condo, townhouse type).

Also trails, and outings--are there good places to take dogs for day hikes, or all the trails pretty strict about dogs?

How's the commute to downtown Denver? Lots of standing traffic? How many hours does it last each day (eq, 3-6 or less or more)
Where would I NOT want to live (ie, it would take an hour each way in traffic).

Hope I don't get scolded for being too far off topic--but dog-a-livability is important, and I kinda think a lot of us E folk have similar interests.

Gnu Blue Box
03-12-2005, 11:13 PM
Denver is the most dog-friendly city I've ever seen. I moved from Eugene almost 2 years ago, with under 15" rain per year you are in for a shock. But there is so much sunshine here that you will soon love it!

I live in Westminster (North-West in denver suburbs) which is probably at the fringe of new growth. The roads are always congested, but you should still spend no more than 45 minutes traveling acrosDenver is the most dog-friendly city I've ever seen. I moved from Eugene almost 2 years ago, with less than 15" rain per year you are in for a shock. But there is so much sunshine here that you will soon love it!

I live in Westminster (North-West in Denver suburbs) which is probably at the fringe of new growth. The roads are always congested, but you should still spend no more than 45 minutes traveling across town.

New houses in the 2000-3000 sq-ft run $200K to $400K, depending on what you want. They have large open spaces almost everywhere, I can walk 2 blocks and be on public open spaces which travel more than 50 miles (with bike trails). This is very typical of more regions. They are opening a few new open dog parks in the city where they donít need to be on a leash. Also, there are millions of prairie dogs so your dog will have a blast chasing them.

If you're looking around, investigate northwards, there seems to be less crime and more development there. The farther you commute the more house you can buy.

Overall, Iíd say it was a great move for my family.
s town.

New houses in the 2000-3000 sq-ft run $200K to $400K, depending on what you want. They have large open spaces almost everywhere, I can walk 2 blocks and be on public open spaces whcih travel more than 50 miles (with bike trails). This is very typical of more regions. They are opening a few new open dog parks in the city where they don;t need to be on a leash. Also, there are millions of prairie dogs so your dog will have a blast chasing them.

If you're looking around, investigate North, there seems to be less crime and more development there. The farther you commute the more house you can buy.

Tessa Y
03-12-2005, 11:22 PM
STATEMENT 1 I live in Westminster (North-West in denver suburbs) which is probably at the fringe of new growth. The roads are always congested, but you should still spend no more than 45 minutes traveling acrosDenver is the most dog-friendly city I've ever seen. I moved from Eugene almost 2 years ago, with less than 15" rain per year you are in for a shock. But there is so much sunshine here that you will soon love it!

STATEMENT 1A I live in Westminster (North-West in Denver suburbs) which is probably at the fringe of new growth. The roads are always congested, but you should still spend no more than 45 minutes traveling across town.

STATEMENT 2 New houses in the 2000-3000 sq-ft run $200K to $400K, depending on what you want. They have large open spaces almost everywhere, I can walk 2 blocks and be on public open spaces which travel more than 50 miles (with bike trails). This is very typical of more regions. They are opening a few new open dog parks in the city where they donít need to be on a leash. Also, there are millions of prairie dogs so your dog will have a blast chasing them.

STATEMENT 3 If you're looking around, investigate northwards, there seems to be less crime and more development there. The farther you commute the more house you can buy.

Overall, Iíd say it was a great move for my family.
s town.

STATEMENT 2B New houses in the 2000-3000 sq-ft run $200K to $400K, depending on what you want. They have large open spaces almost everywhere, I can walk 2 blocks and be on public open spaces whcih travel more than 50 miles (with bike trails). This is very typical of more regions. They are opening a few new open dog parks in the city where they don;t need to be on a leash. Also, there are millions of prairie dogs so your dog will have a blast chasing them.

STATEMENT 3B If you're looking around, investigate North, there seems to be less crime and more development there. The farther you commute the more house you can buy.
Having some problems there with the cut and paste buttons? ;-)

DOGBOX
03-13-2005, 11:50 PM
Gnu BlueBox--you gave me a boatload of useful information. THANK YOU SO MUCH! I am glad it works well for dogs. My fear was that I'd move to this beautiful place only to find dogs can't go anywhere. Up here I still have a few hidden trails where I can turn my dogs out to run and we don't run into anybody so nobody is there to complain or get offended by off leash dogs. But even so, some of my favorite spots are being discovered.

I like older homes, but I need a good size lot. I have a nice home right near downtown Portland at this time, but development will be soon crowding us out and making my lifestyle not what I want it to be. Guess that's just called growth--it's hard when it happens right next to the land you love, though. So I will likely have to sell, and I'm thinking of just pushing on and possibly taking work some other state.

Lapiz & Topaz
03-15-2005, 01:43 PM
I live in Louisville, northwest of Denver, southeast of Boulder. Lots & lots of dogs in Louisville & Boulder. Boulder & Louisville both have dog off lead areas and the city of Boulder has lots of open space trails which are off-lead. However, just as in many areas of the country, there's lots of controversy about where dogs should be off-lead but with 45% of the population who are dog owners, there will continue to be off lead areas. Denver also has a lot of dog owners who play agility and there are many training centers and competitions to pick from. Then there's the National Forest where there are many trails where dogs can be off lead. Be aware that the National Parks are off limits to dogs (i.e. Rocky Mountain National Park) and the National Wilderness areas are on lead only.
On the commute, if your potential job is located near the lite rail or a regional bus, that would be a plus in your decision. Ask them about it...big transit funding package was just approved in Colorado so 10 years from now you could be putting a lot less miles on your Element!

There is a potential job for me in Denver. I've never been, and folks I know have given mixed reviews. Specifically, I would be interested in buying a home with a good size yard and preferably live in a dog-friendly neighborhood--like a place wiith a cool doggy park or some such thing. Would that be like outrageously expensive or average? Oh, and what's average for the price of a home (not condo, townhouse type).

Also trails, and outings--are there good places to take dogs for day hikes, or all the trails pretty strict about dogs?

How's the commute to downtown Denver? Lots of standing traffic? How many hours does it last each day (eq, 3-6 or less or more)
Where would I NOT want to live (ie, it would take an hour each way in traffic).

Hope I don't get scolded for being too far off topic--but dog-a-livability is important, and I kinda think a lot of us E folk have similar interests.