Arthritis treatment for dogs [Archive] - Honda Element Owners Club Forum

: Arthritis treatment for dogs


hiker chick
04-06-2006, 08:44 PM
An annual subscription to the monthly on-line Whole Dog Journal is the best $16 a dog owner will every spend. They have no advertising and are entirely subscriber-supported. I just got this month's issue and am especially excited by this article that I'll excerpt below. My Samoyed, Gidget, is still young (nearly 4 years) and fine but I'm mindful how quickly the senior years and maladies arrive. This looks like a terrific arthritis remedy and the manufacturer is offering a discount to WDJ subscribers: www.wholedogjournal.com (http://www.wholedogjournal.com)

Safe Pain Relief

</I>Check out this incredibly promising herbal arthritis pain-relief product.


By Jan Skadberg


As the sole practitioner of a small animal practice encompassing massage, acupressure, homeopathy, and custom-blended flower essences, I’m always looking for products that may be effective for my clients’ animals. The most obvious, positive, long-lasting results I have seen have come from the use of acupressure, massage, and homeopathy. Yet when I heard from a third client about a product called “DGP” (short for “Dog Gone Pain”), I decided it was time to investigate – especially after witnessing how the client’s dogs who received the supplement enjoyed an increase in flexibility, decrease in joint pain, and obvious elevation in spirits. ..........

:)

AuntDale
04-06-2006, 11:32 PM
I tried to locate the article by Jan Skadberg on the link but could not quite find it.

But if the remedy is for arthritis and IF it is glucosomine/chondroidin there are recent articles on the net finding it IS effective in helping ease arthritis pain.
I am not sure of its side effects.

The term arthritis can include as many as 250 different diseases. Usually, the type most folks know of is osteo arthritis caused by wear and tear upon the joints. This is the type that would affect, I am guessing, dogs and cats and other mammals. Humans are affected by it as well as the other 250. I am told Sharks do not have arthritis and that is the reason "Shark Cartilage" is often touted as a cure. Although, not a recognized successful treatment.

A few years ago, the late James Coburn, endorsed and advertised MSM as a cure for Rheumatoid Arthritis (a disease of the immune system). It, however, has adverse side effects. As does Celebrex which was the "new" miracle cure a few years ago for osteo, but it was soon removed from the market because of side effects.

After participating in several clinical trials for Rheumatoid Arthritis at Vanderbilt University Medical Center here in Nashville, including a study of magnets and copper bracelets (LOL) I learned there is no actual cure, only perhaps disease modifiers and pain relief medications. One of the best, being good old aspirin. Although I would consult a vet before giving aspirin I know it is harmful to cats, not sure about dogs.

I would research thoroughly the active ingredients in the remedy being adverstised, as I feel certain you would anyway. Primarily I would try to discover what side effects go with the treatment you are considering.
Your beautiful Gidget deserves no less than any human patient.
Interestingly enuf, one of the best deterrents to Osteo Arthritis is just what you are already doing with Gidget in all of your pictures, exercise. Ironically the very thing that wears the joints, also works to keep them healthy and moving. (This advice came from my Rheumatologist, an arthritis specialist)
Good Luck

Sidecar
04-06-2006, 11:58 PM
I have a 13 year old Doberman who can attest to the benefits of glucosomine and chondroidin as an effective arthritis treatment. It takes a while before recognizing results. Apparently it stimulates or otherwise assists in a rebuilding process for the ailing joints. Arlo has been taking a doggie version that we buy at Trader Joe's for several years. It is their house brand formulated specifically for dogs. There have been no apparent ill side effects. Arlo is very old for his breed and has physically changed alot these last few years. He does one to two three milers a day with me at a pretty good lope. He's stiff when he wakes up, but then so am I. Aspirin's effect is primarily as an anti-inflamatory. Long term use could lead to bleeding problems.
Arlo is gettig pretty deaf and his eyesite is going but he's always ready to go for a long power walk. Since he "had" arthritis (can hardly tell now) I have to credit the G/C.

fcorey
04-24-2006, 12:03 AM
My 12yr old golden Dakota is a veteran of 2 knee surgeries and has hip dysplasia. He was on anti-inflamtory and non-steroidal drugs so long he has liver damage. But the old man still has spirit and is doing very well considering... my wife found a flyer on alternative medicine and it mentioned accupuncture. I was very skeptical, but its worked for the last couple of years and has allowed us to eliminate the drugs. He does get shots of adequan (basically an injected glucosamine condroitin).
There arent many Vets that do it, but if you are in a situation where drug treatment isnt an option its worth a shot. We see Dr. Betsy Krieger at Animal Health center in Walpole Mass. she does a great job.

jurneez
04-24-2006, 01:32 PM
An annual subscription to the monthly on-line Whole Dog Journal is the best $16 a dog owner will every spend. They have no advertising and are entirely subscriber-supported. I just got this month's issue and am especially excited by this article that I'll excerpt below. My Samoyed, Gidget, is still young (nearly 4 years) and fine but I'm mindful how quickly the senior years and maladies arrive. This looks like a terrific arthritis remedy and the manufacturer is offering a discount to WDJ subscribers: www.wholedogjournal.com (http://www.wholedogjournal.com)

Safe Pain Relief

</I>Check out this incredibly promising herbal arthritis pain-relief product.


By Jan Skadberg


As the sole practitioner of a small animal practice encompassing massage, acupressure, homeopathy, and custom-blended flower essences, I’m always looking for products that may be effective for my clients’ animals. The most obvious, positive, long-lasting results I have seen have come from the use of acupressure, massage, and homeopathy. Yet when I heard from a third client about a product called “DGP” (short for “Dog Gone Pain”), I decided it was time to investigate – especially after witnessing how the client’s dogs who received the supplement enjoyed an increase in flexibility, decrease in joint pain, and obvious elevation in spirits. ..........

:)




I to am interested but after clicking where would the article be under.....
the menu is huge.....
jurn

hiker chick
04-24-2006, 07:47 PM
Sorry about that, Jurneez, I screwed up the link. Here you go:

http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/

You have to subscribe, of course.

ADAMLSTL
04-24-2006, 08:50 PM
I use the Glucosamine Chondroitin mix and it seems to work well... Some dog foods have it but too little. Add more and give it a while... Raise the food and water bowl up on something for better digestion.:) Walk the dog daily...:cool:

samlobo
07-29-2006, 07:06 PM
Definitely a fan of Glucosamine & Chondroitin. I have seen results in my dogs and it is noticeable when they miss a dose. May I also recommend MSM supplements? You can get them at Sam's Club or Costco in the health section and they are not just for healthy skin, coat, and nails. MSM helps arthritis as well.

I have recently restarted accupuncture on my Sam, an English Mastiff, and found a wonderful holistic vet named Dr. Ferguson http://www.naturalvet.org in the Northwest Florida area. He is doing accupuncture, herbal treatment, accupressure (I can do it at home), massage techniques (again, at home), and pure aloe vera gel on Sam, who not only had surgery for cancer, but also has a back disease affecting his hindquarters. I bring this up because I LOVE his approach to treatment. For those of you in the Florida area, please check his website out and if you live close enough, hopefully you'll decide to go to him. He is based out of St. Augustine and travels between four different vet offices. Even if you do not live in the area, check out the website and read his approach to treatment and I think you'll find it fascinating.

In the meantime, you can find cheaper versions of Cosequin (for those of you using this overpriced Glucosamine/Chondriotin vet supplement), consider switching to the human form of it at Sam's Club or Costco called Joint Care. If you are set on a made-for-dogs supplement, consider Arthogen, a much less expensive version of Cosequin. It's available at any online vet meds website. The cheapest one I found was on: http://www.petmedstore.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?page=petmedstore/CTGY/arthogendog

elevet
07-30-2006, 03:24 PM
Glucosamine and chondroitin +/_ MSM is great for osteo arthritis. You must remember that this is a nutraceutical that takes approximately 6 weeks to reach effective tissue levels. These supplements help the body make the healthiest cartilage and joint fluid possible to lubricate the joints-they are not anti inflammatory drugs. Having established this fact, they work wonderfully with most prescription, veterinary, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories. If your dog is on these, it is important to have blood work to check his or her liver function about every 6 months. As for other herbal ingredients or additives, remember-herbs are DRUGS disguised as plants. In other words, just because it's herbal doesn't mean it's harmless. As in human medicine, many herbal ingredients can be toxic or interact with other medicines or affect chronic disease treatments (thyroid, kidney, etc). Another thing that bothers me about all the new "natural" stuff is that there are few clinical trials to assess a proper dosage or toxic level in companion animals. Let's not even get into quality control issues since veterinary nutraceutical products aren't even held to the standards of human supplements.... Bottom line, Glu/Chon is great stuff, beware other things that have not been as well documented. We love our critters and want them to be happy :)

samlobo
07-30-2006, 06:07 PM
Elevet, I totally agree with you, as I should since you're the one who spent several years nugging it out in vet school and I didn't! I made my vet aware of all the supplements that Sam is on before he prescribed the herb, but I do understand that they are not held to the same standard unfortunately. The best I can do is watch for subtle changes for the worse and bring it up to my vet immediately.

Thanks for the sound advice!!!:) :) :) :)

elevet
07-30-2006, 08:02 PM
Hope Sam does well, that's a sweet mug!

Zoolaine
05-22-2007, 01:30 PM
Does anyone know the recommended dosage for dogs? Everything that I have seen as been from a web site trying to sell their product. Wondering if anyone had unbiased info. There seems to be a huge range of products out there with quite different dosages. My dogs are 70-85 pounds.

pangaea
05-22-2007, 03:33 PM
Zoolaine, if you're using the liquid (seems to work faster) the dosage would be about .75 tsp/day. For pills, 1000 mg/day.

Kathy

Zoolaine
05-22-2007, 06:35 PM
Zoolaine, if you're using the liquid (seems to work faster) the dosage would be about .75 tsp/day. For pills, 1000 mg/day.

Kathy

Any suggestions on brands, etc? how do you use the liquid, pour it on their food? With 3 dogs this seems like it's going to be pricey, are human glucosamine pills the same? Thanks for your help

pangaea
05-23-2007, 02:21 PM
I first used human pills from Costco. But then I switched to the liquid (Synflex) because the vet told me it worked better and faster. (I had an older dog with arthritis then.) I just poured it on their food. And as you suspected, it is a bit pricey for three dogs, albeit small. But it's a lot cheaper when you buy three bottles at a time. Now I'm giving my guys Hylasport Canine (http://www.horsetech.com/hylasport-canine.htm), which is a lot more economical. And since I'm giving it to my performance dogs for prevention rather than treatment, I'm not as concerned with how quickly it works.

Solid
05-24-2007, 03:15 AM
...glucosomine and chondroidin... Arlo has been taking a doggie version that we buy at Trader Joe's for several years. It is their house brand formulated specifically for dogs. There have been no apparent ill side effects...

Thanks for the confirmation; I shop primarily at Trader Joe's, and have been eye-balling that bottle for a couple of weeks now for my 8 yr-old shepherd mix. I just wasn't convinced of its effectivenesss.

I haven't noticed any stiffness in him, but plan to start him early on the G&C as a preventative measure against arthritis.