A few of my favorite [camping] things... [Archive] - Page 3 - Honda Element Owners Club Forum

: A few of my favorite [camping] things...


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joebh
01-11-2008, 02:20 AM
To Bike Zen
Since I will normally have a long kayak or canoe on the Element roof when I camp with the Napier SUV tent, do you think running a tarp from the rear of the canoe or kayak over the peak of the SUV tent might help prevent the rain intrusion you mention?? The optional full rain fly mentioned on the website, vs the mini rain fly supplied with the original tent, seemed like a lot of money. Are you saying it was not useful in keeping the rain out??

Hondamade4dogs
01-11-2008, 07:36 AM
Are those Skreenz ?

paulj
01-11-2008, 12:25 PM
FYI-
I have the same tent (w/full rain fly) and I haven't been able to make an strong seal around the roof to prevent water coming in during a good storm. (but i like your magnet idea ) The angle of the roof slopes toward the seal and its a loosing battle. The result is a stream of water coming down the hatch edge and puddling inside the tent (we sleep in the back of our E too) In desperation I carry a large enough tarp to cover the E and the tent in the case of a downpour.

I hadn't thought about that water drainage issue with this type of tent. I am aware, though, of the water flow pattern off the Element's roof. The back half of the roof slopes toward the rear. Most of the rain flows to the gutters under the plastic trim, and from there down the channel beside the rear hatch, and on to the ground.

This isn't a problem with my 'midsize campertop tent' which encloses the open tailgate. I tuck the bottom under the lower tailgate, but not the bumper, so it doesn't catch the draining water. This 'tent' has a flap that can extend forward on the roof nearly to the roof rack, though I usually arrange it so it only covers about a foot of the root. It does cover the valley formed by the upper edge of the raised hatch, and a puddle of water can collect there. This puddle can't leak into the car, but I have dowsed myself a few times when taking the tent down.

For the big tailgate tents I would suggest two approaches. Look at how you arrange the sleeve around the lower tailgate and bumper. Maybe you can arrange it so the water drains harmlessly to the ground without getting into the tent. Consider a tarp over the back half of the Element's roof, with a ridge along the middle so water drains to the sides. A boat or pole strapped to the roof rack would be a good support for such a tarp.

Here's a picture of the enclosure with the top flap 'folded short', and wind blowing
http://www.pbase.com/paulj3/image/49030797.jpg

and a picture with the flap extended forward - actually it looks like the flap could extend to the mid point of the roof
http://www.pbase.com/paulj3/image/49213925.jpg

Bike Zen
01-11-2008, 12:41 PM
Paul,
Yes, the SUV tents require a pretty good seal under the tailgate. Maybe that can be rearranged forward to allow for better drainage (for those un-expected showers), but it will also break the lower seal and allow cold air and critters in. If there is a strong chance of rain, I cover the entire E/tent combo with a tarp.
I like your custom tent back, but sometimes for extended stays, we have too much gear to stow outside (2 bikes, etc) Thats why we use the SUV tent.
thanks for the advice!

Bike Zen
01-11-2008, 12:45 PM
To Bike Zen
Since I will normally have a long kayak or canoe on the Element roof when I camp with the Napier SUV tent, do you think running a tarp from the rear of the canoe or kayak over the peak of the SUV tent might help prevent the rain intrusion you mention?? The optional full rain fly mentioned on the website, vs the mini rain fly supplied with the original tent, seemed like a lot of money. Are you saying it was not useful in keeping the rain out??

Joe,
I think the small fly will shed water sufficiently on the tent, my main issue was with the water coming down the rear sloping roof line of the E. If you can keep water off the roof, then the problem would be solved. A tarp on your kayak might be perfect!:)

hiker chick
01-11-2008, 03:55 PM
http://www.elementownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19318&highlight=hiker+chick+tent

The link above is to a thread on SUV tents that includes probably my most detailed description of my experiences with the SUV tent -- includes comment on the "itty bitty fly."

I used mine most extensively in '06. Considering how tall the tent is and how brittle the extremely long fiberglass poles must be, I was surprised that had not had a problem with high winds. And it was tested by some significant thunderstorms. As for water leakage, I had one experience with water pooling on the top of the tunnel because I had closed the Element's rear hatch during the night -- duh, that was a mistake during a rainstorm. The most water that's gotten inside the tent was after I failed to recognize beforehand that I'd set the tent up directly in a drainage path for water runoff -- essentially a dry riverbed. There was a storm and the tent wall and floor failed to repel the raging creek that developed -- again, no tent would have.

I never had water get into the Element.


[

Bike Zen
01-11-2008, 04:30 PM
http://www.elementownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19318&highlight=hiker+chick+tent

The link above is to a thread on SUV tents that includes probably my most detailed description of my experiences with the SUV tent -- includes comment on the "itty bitty fly."

I used mine most extensively in '06. Considering how tall the tent is and how brittle the extremely long fiberglass poles must be, I was surprised that had not had a problem with high winds. And it was tested by some significant thunderstorms. As for water leakage, I had one experience with water pooling on the top of the tunnel because I had closed the Element's rear hatch during the night -- duh, that was a mistake during a rainstorm. The most water that's gotten inside the tent was after I failed to recognize beforehand that I'd set the tent up directly in a drainage path for water runoff -- essentially a dry riverbed. There was a storm and the tent wall and floor failed to repel the raging creek that developed -- again, no tent would have.

I never had water get into the Element.


[

Thanks Hiker Chick, your previous write up was great.

I now have 3 years on my Napier tent and I'm afraid shes done for. (Too many problems to fix)
For the low purchase price, I might consider another one.
(mine had aluminum poles)

By the way, the Cabellas tent is a Napier with special colors for Cabellas.

I never had water get into the Element
I have never heard of anyone getting water inside their element from these tents either. But keep the camp stories coming :)

riverdog
01-13-2008, 01:03 AM
I got divorced several years ago, quit my job and bought an Element. In spring
I lived in the NP's of the SW and in fall spent months in NP's in the NW eventually driving the coast from Wa to Santa Cruz and then to Yosemite etc.

What worked for me was purchasing both noseeum and regular sized tent screening which I cut into pieces that would fit over the side windows. I would
hold these on with small magnets.....that way I had cross ventilation and could
run the windows up if it rained. I purchased the Honda top screen but found
that bugs came in around the snaps anyway. Putting a large piece of screen
over the top hatch and securing it with small magnets worked like a champ.

I have a bad back and use a sleep on air bed for it BUT amazingly found that
the passenger seat reclined onto the seat behind it worked fine for my 5'11"
height. I had no back problems at all on those seats!

For space I removed the seat behind the drivers side and have mostly left it
out over the years.

Haven't read all the posts on this thread yet but maybe this wasn't covered.

John

hiker chick
01-17-2008, 10:19 PM
This tent certainly is out of the ordinary. Don't have to worry about a ground cloth. :)

This online "magazine" has a lot of nice pics of an array of camping gear - from tents to boots, jackets, lights, etcetera. I'm not seeing reviews, just product descriptions.

http://www.campist.com/

Also, Eureka tents has an online outlet that sometimes has very good deals on "seconds" and returns.

http://www.eurekacampingctr.com/eureka/




http://www.campist.com/archives/treetents-camping-tent-by-dre-wapenaar.jpg

BXGR8R
01-17-2008, 10:31 PM
Treetents retail for $50,000? Eyechiiwawa!!

hiker chick
01-18-2008, 10:01 PM
Cabela's has some New for 2008 stuff on-line.

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=catfeatcamp&id=0053370518228a&navCount=19&podId=0053370&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true


This sink has glamping potential:
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?id=0052304518239a&navCount=20&podId=0052304&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=jump&cmCat=catfeatcamp&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true&hasJS=true


Portable-Rechargeable Air Conditioner for $80
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=catfeatcamp&id=0053085518260a&navCount=28&podId=0053085&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true&hasJS=true


Kelty "Car Tarp"
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=catfeatcamp&id=0053086518119a&navCount=27&podId=0053086&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true


Wouldn't have known this was a chair if it was not entitled so
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?id=0052326518212a&navCount=33&podId=0052326&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=jump&cmCat=catfeatcamp&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true&hasJS=true


An all-terrain cooler
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=catfeatcamp&id=0053084518259a&navCount=37&podId=0053084&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true


And Cuisinart has a cook set for camping-RVs.
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=catfeatcamp&id=0053370518228a&navCount=19&podId=0053370&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true

B1ke Box
01-19-2008, 08:32 AM
"No more uncomfortable nights in hot tents or campers. This unit uses ice, a potent fan and misting technology to lower a room's temperature by up to 30°F. A fully charged unit with battery backup will run up to 24 hours"

This does have a lot of potential.

jdiane
01-19-2008, 02:10 PM
An all-terrain cooler
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=catfeatcamp&id=0053084518259a&navCount=37&podId=0053084&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true

[/COLOR]

This reminds me of those Bud Light "real men of Genius" radio ads... :rolleyes:

But I was wondering if those coolers that advertise "will keep ice up to 7 days" really work??? I know Coleman makes one and have seen a couple at REI, but I cant remember if I'd read if any EOCers had that kind... :confused: I'd like to replace our two smaller triangle-shaped playmate coolers with a bigger rectangle cooler for our Rocky Mountain Jamboree roadtrip in August, but I hate the soggy food packages you get with melted ice. hmm, I wonder if they would also keep those gel-filled icepacks cold for 7 days... :confused:

hiker chick
01-19-2008, 05:40 PM
This reminds me of those Bud Light "real men of Genius" radio ads... :rolleyes:

But I was wondering if those coolers that advertise "will keep ice up to 7 days" really work??? I know Coleman makes one and have seen a couple at REI, but I cant remember if I'd read if any EOCers had that kind... :confused: I'd like to replace our two smaller triangle-shaped playmate coolers with a bigger rectangle cooler for our Rocky Mountain Jamboree roadtrip in August, but I hate the soggy food packages you get with melted ice. hmm, I wonder if they would also keep those gel-filled icepacks cold for 7 days... :confused:

I have a Coleman X-treme (two, actually) and they've kept ice for 5 days for me before I came home and dumped it. The X-treme's effectiveness comes from the extremely thick walls of the cooler, so the external size of those coolers are deceptive. They come in a number of sizes. I also have an Igloo cube -- definately not as insulating as the X-treme but, alas, it does not have the super-thick walls.

My favorite cooler is the retro Coleman 54-quart Steel Cooler. Thinner walls than the X-treme, reputedly keeps things cold for three days in 100-degree heat.

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/ColemanCom/category_main.asp?CategoryID=8500

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?page=coleman-54-quart-steel-cooler&categoryId=41561&parentCategory=9970&cat4=9921&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1&feat=9921-sub2

For a long trip I'd recommend taking two coolers: one for drinks and one for food. Presumably, the drink cooler would be opened more often so having separate coolers will keep the food cooler mostly closed up and better at retaining the cold.

Block ice lasts longer than cubes. For the drink cooler, I freeze water bottles full of water and iced tea. Plan menus strategically -- eat the good steaks-chicken-fish early in the trip. Freeze chili and have that later, etcetera, etcetera.

Forget the gel-filled ice packs. Far better to freeze water bottles.

:)

hiker chick
01-19-2008, 05:43 PM
B1ke Box -- thanks for posting that pic, that rig would surely appeal to Gidget. She's used to being out front.

:)

jdiane
01-19-2008, 06:51 PM
I have a Coleman X-treme (two, actually) and they've kept ice for 5 days for me before I came home and dumped it. The X-treme's effectiveness comes from the extremely thick walls of the cooler, so the external size of those coolers are deceptive. They come in a number of sizes. I also have an Igloo cube -- definately not as insulating as the X-treme but, alas, it does not have the super-thick walls.

:)

Good to know they actually work more or less as advertised. :) Space is less of an issue than its ability to keep cool and clean (usually we have alot more dry food than cooler food anyway). We also use frozen water bottles-- if we are doing a local day hike, I will also throw a gatorade bottle or two in the freezer the night before-- by the time we hike all morning the gatorade has unfrozen just in time for lunch. ;-)

paulj
01-19-2008, 07:02 PM
The rectangular 1/2 gallon, bottles that juice often comes in these days make good ice-bottles for a cooler. The shape saves space in the freezer and the cooler. After they thaw, on a long trip, I continue to use them as water bottles. And I end up with too many, I'm can toss them (yes, yes, I recycle if that is an option!).
paulj

Box4Rox
01-20-2008, 12:31 PM
Cabela's has some New for 2008 stuff on-line.


And Cuisinart has a cook set for camping-RVs.
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=catfeatcamp&id=0053370518228a&navCount=19&podId=0053370&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true


Thanks for the tip on the cookware :)

I've been looking for something like that for the Teardrop; currently using a mish-mash of old pots and skillets with fixed handles that take up a lot of space. :sad:

Found it on sale here for $99.00 :arrow: https://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/details.cgi?pdesc=Cuisinart_Stowaway_Cookware_Set&r=view&i=79848&aID=



EDIT: here it is again for $99.00 with free shipping and no tax (for me anyways) :arrow: http://www.chefsresource.com/cuisinart-stowaway-cookware.html

bh045ct
01-20-2008, 07:29 PM
The set is also available at West Marine for $99.99, plus they have free ground shipping for orders over $99


http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/producte/10001/-1/10001/279450/377%20710%201163/0/Cookware/Primary%20Search/mode%20matchallpartial/0/WMPrice|1cid=E080120DD?N=377%20710%201163&Ne=0&Ntt=Cookware&Ntx=mode%20matchallpartial&page=CategoryDisplayLevel1&isLTokenURL=true&storeNum=62&subdeptNum=382&classNum=382

hiker chick
01-20-2008, 10:26 PM
A big shout out for Lowe Renegade boots.

http://www.rei.com/product/733458

Am on my 4th pair or so -- they and Smartwool ski socks [/COLOR]blessedly [COLOR=DarkGreen]kept my toes toasty. They have also always been excellent for gripping the smooth rocks of Shenandoah NP. Would delineate the other layers that protected me from the cold today but that would be a long list. Very long.

paulj
01-21-2008, 03:36 AM
What's it got's in its pocketsez?

I have a red Kelty pack like Gidget's -only it's in size S (and even that is border line large for my 15lb terrier). It's not practical, but since it was on sale (guess where - 3 letters!) I decided occasional 'cute' comment made it worth while.

Come to think of it, my favorite daypack is a red and black Kelty Gale.

paulj

hiker chick
01-21-2008, 10:25 AM
What's it got's in its pocketsez?

I have a red Kelty pack like Gidget's -only it's in size S (and even that is border line large for my 15lb terrier). It's not practical, but since it was on sale (guess where - 3 letters!) I decided occasional 'cute' comment made it worth while.

Come to think of it, my favorite daypack is a red and black Kelty Gale.

paulj

Paul - I love that little pack, it was Gidget's first and the separate pack-harness configuration is handy (for those not familiar with the pack, it attaches by velcro to a harness, to which the leash can attach).

http://www.rei.com/product/684240

That pack is handy for small stuff that I don't want to have to remove my backpack to find. Yesterday I had mostly clothing accessories in it -- extra gloves, ear muffs, balacava, neck gaiter, chemical hand warmers.

Thank goodness I was concerned enough about the cold to pack that stuff. One of the other hikers' gloves got wet a couple hours into the hike so I was able to whip out a dry pair for her and the chemical hand warmers that she put into her gloves and warmed right up.

But for the extra gloves and hand warmers, she was uncomfortable enough that she was going to turn back.

In the summer, if Gidget is wearing the pack (I don't put it on her in hot weather) then I'll put super light stuff in it like bandanas, antiseptic wipes, anti-itch tubes, poop bags and her treats.

If I were going for "working dog points" (WSXM is the ultimate working dog achievement for Samoyeds) then Gidget's pack would have to start out weighing 25% of her weight and to achieve that she'd carry water bottles (the load lightens as the water is consumed, or dumped). I have a medium-sized Wolfpack for such bigger loads. Wolfpacks is an excellent small business in southern Oregon. The owners are big time hikers and skijor, sled and scooter with their pups:

http://www.wolfpacks.com/

:)

I was so cautious yesterday that I threw a sleeping bag in the car for the remote possibility that the car could break down. It was not a day (nor is today) to be stranded without the ability to stay warm.

Wolfpacks dogs
http://www.wolfpacks.com/nimbus/images/mtnlakes2.jpgOnce we hiked down the steep sides of the caldera, our route went past many beautiful lakes. This is Como Lake, which was very clear and peaceful. Pictured on the left are Linda with Lightning & Nimbus. In the middle is our friend Candice with Corby (Ch. Wolf River's Chelestina Warrior). On the right is Francisca with Reign (Chelestina's Reign On Fire). All of these beautiful dogs are related.
Nimbus, Corby, and Reign earned points toward their Working Samoyed titles on this 14 mile trip. Lightning has already earned his Master Working Samoyed (http://www.wolfpacks.com/lightning/WSXM.htm), which is the most advanced working title offered by the Samoyed Club of America.

*Lightning's full name is BISS Am/Can Ch. Wolf River's Moonlight Ridge WSXM CGC JHD HCT
BISS - Best In Show Specialty (2004 SCA National Specialty, unofficial title)
Am/Can = American & Canadian
Ch. = Champion (American Kennel Club & Canadian Kennel Club title)
WSXM = Master Working Samoyed (Samoyed Club of America title)
CGC = Canine Good Citizen (American Kennel Club title)
JHD = Junior Herding Dog (American Herding Breed Association title)
HCT = Herding Capability Test (American Herding Breed Association title)

Another gratuitous Gidg pic:

hiker chick
01-22-2008, 09:33 AM
Red-hot sale prices at LL Bean on some items, including my favorite chair ($29) :)

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?page=outdoor-gear&categoryId=502013&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1

Rocket Dog
01-22-2008, 01:45 PM
Red-hot sale prices at LL Bean on some items, including my favorite chair ($29) :)

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?page=outdoor-gear&categoryId=502013&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1




Thanks for the tip. I bought one.

Box4Rox
01-26-2008, 11:16 PM
Cabela's has some New for 2008 stuff on-line.


And Cuisinart has a cook set for camping-RVs.
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=catfeatcamp&id=0053370518228a&navCount=19&podId=0053370&parentId=cat603302&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat603302&hasJS=true


My "Hiker chick approved" cookware showed yesterday (I have a theory she gets commission on all EOC sales placed at REI, Campmor, LLBean, . . . ) . . . looks good so far; what wasn't so obvious on the Cabela site was that these all have a cast aluminum bottom (encased in stainless) so they should perform much better than just straight 18-10 stainless. :)

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b91/Obi_the_dog/Teardrop/cookware2.jpg

hiker chick
01-27-2008, 08:19 AM
. looks good so far; what wasn't so obvious on the Cabela site was that these all have a cast aluminum bottom (encased in stainless) so they should perform much better than just straight 18-10 stainless. :)


Very shiny! What's on the menu? :)

Yesterday I reserved a few of my favorite campsites. Resisted the temptation to book a camping weekend in March -- had to remind myself what a tease that month is.

In addition to being the first full year with the teardrop, 2008 will be the first full year with this inflatable "kayak" (really more of a canoe).

Meanwhile, Gidget and I will be bikejoring today -- an upside of winter.

Sevylor Colorado Inflatable Canoe (Item 751790)
http://media.rei.com/media/e/1134319.jpg (http://www.rei.com/features/zoom.html?img440=/media/e/1134320%26style=751790%26sku=7216630017&imageServiceHost=http://www.rei.com/&productInfoServiceHost=http://www.rei.com/&TB_iframe=true&height=500&width=700)

Jojo
01-27-2008, 10:07 AM
You'll love the kayak HC!
We have one, it's a little heavier to push through the water than the smaller plastic ones, but they are great for dogs, a lot more stable.:)

hiker chick
01-27-2008, 10:38 AM
You'll love the kayak HC!
We have one, it's a little heavier to push through the water than the smaller plastic ones, but they are great for dogs, a lot more stable.:)

That's good to know, JoJo, thanks. I need a stable boat because I'm not sure how stable Gidget will be. My first Samoyed, Buck, loved swimming, loved riding in a canoe, loved to retrieve sticks and even logs from the water. Couldn't get enough of it.

Gidget loves being in water but not so deep that she has to swim.

We may end up starring on You Tube.

:)

Jojo
01-27-2008, 11:38 AM
Gidget is smart, she'll learn quick.
When I 1st put Tank in the kayak, he jumped out as soon as I paddled out, good thing for the life jacket and the handle on the back!:shock:

He learned though and now sits back and enjoys the ride:)

B1ke Box
01-31-2008, 05:04 PM
Ordered a couple of the chairs to replace Bass Pro Shop $10 Quad Chairs and took a chance on the GSI Macro Table also on sale. It arrived today. The table is about the same size as the one we currently use, but packs down to 1/3 the size and weighs less than 1/2 as much. Thanks hiker chick.

Junebug
02-01-2008, 11:53 AM
Perhaps my very favorite camping thing is a 20% off any one item coupon at rei-outlet.com (http://www.rei.com/outlet)!

Junebug
02-01-2008, 12:03 PM
The organizer thing I got (http://www.rei.com/REI-Outlet/product/768138) would be a great use of the 20% off!

B1ke Box
02-01-2008, 02:05 PM
$359 Sierra Designs Bedouin 6 Tent for $200 after the extra discount.
76 square feet and enough height for me to stand up in.

http://www.rei.com/REI-Outlet/product/768768

hiker chick
02-01-2008, 10:20 PM
Interesting article on how tailgating has become a great business for Coleman and other camp gear suppliers.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/01/AR2008020103090.html?hpid=topnews

All Fired Up

Camping Gear Sold To Tailgaters to Get Them . . .


A century ago, Coleman made its name selling lanterns to farmers and shop owners who lived outside of the electrical grid. During World War II, at the request of the military, the company created the GI Pocket Stove, which could burn any type of fuel. In the 1950s, Coleman became synonymous with rugged gear for campers and outdoor enthusiasts.
Now, the company has set its sights on a new breed of adventurer with special needs of its own: the tailgater.

... During an average tailgate, Abela can feed as many as 200 people. He hauls so many supplies to the game that he has to take the seats out of his minivan. There are the space heaters to keep everyone warm, the two Redskins tents, a charcoal grill that has been converted to a fire pit to roast marshmallows and even a beer pong table.

"I'm running out of room," Abela said.

kissya
02-01-2008, 10:33 PM
I went to the Coleman outlet in pigeon forge...:D The first thing I bought was a headlamp...woohoo Then I bought 2 grill baskets....they were half the normal retail. I may have posted earlier about this trip.....lol I need to get a life!!:rolleyes:

B1ke Box
02-01-2008, 10:53 PM
You can save money on a Redskin's tent 'cause it doesn't need to be 4 season rated. Now if you want a Giants or Patriots tent, that will cost a little more.

Backcountry Edge
02-02-2008, 01:33 AM
$359 Sierra Designs Bedouin 6 Tent for $200 after the extra discount.
76 square feet and enough height for me to stand up in.

http://www.rei.com/REI-Outlet/product/768768

Great deal on a great closeout tent. The only change between that model and the 08' model is that Sierra Designs has adopted a more eco friendly method of coloring their tent fabrics. No functional changes.

I actually bought one of these earlier in the year for a family member. The tent is SPACIOUS, and the vestibules are great. No complaints!

csm
02-02-2008, 12:29 PM
I ordered a 48" folding table and the kitchen center thing from rei-outlet this morning. getting excited! I can use the table tailgating at the local ski hill but the kitchen thing is just too cool!
I managed to use the 20% coupon twice!

Rocket Dog
02-02-2008, 09:20 PM
I guess everybody is getting the REI Outlet email. This bag caught my eye for those who want a nice little gear bag to match their SOP. :rolleyes:

http://www.rei.com/REI-Outlet/product/768110

46062

Backcountry Edge
02-03-2008, 12:06 PM
I received a single nest hammock for Christmas, which is made by eagles nest outfitters. I now find myself trying to invent uses and places to string it up. Even considered running some lag hooks into the some points in my spare bedroom at home........ just for fun. I did get a set of straps, that are sold separately, that are designed to wrap around trees to provided mounting points that do not do damage to the utilized trees. Overall, it is cool, packs down to slightly larger than a softball in it's own attached bag, and is easy to set up. Oh yeah.... it comes in a bunch of color combinations. No reason to every be without it.

B1ke Box
02-03-2008, 02:42 PM
Been experimenting with a Hennessy Hammock for backcounty bike touring.
A little lighter than my solo tent, lighter yet if you are shorter than 6'. See all the models and compare => http://www.hennessyhammock.com/comparisonchart.html

riverdog
02-05-2008, 12:19 AM
Made some changes to my E this snowed in weekend. With backseats removed
I cut two 1/4" thick boards, one to fit over the spare tire well and the other
to cover the front area. Over that I put down two closed cell foam pads (duct
taped together so they won't spread apart) and over that a piece of indoor/outdoor carpeting to fit the entire floor area. While I have have travelled tens of thousands of miles sleeping with the front seat reclined to the back I decided I would try sleeping on the floor as it is less conspicuous in certain
situations and far simpler to pull over and do. When I bought my E I purchased
the privacy curtains but having learned from the posts here I picked up a roll
of Reflectix. As mentioned in a previous post I have cut bulk screening (both
no see-um and regular mesh) to put over all the windows with many small
magnets. Last but not least (thanks again to this site) I decided to get rid
of all my piles of stuff and put things in various size larger plastic containers
that can be stacked for increased floor space while sleeping etc. Oh yes, one
more thing I learned here....I have Yakima racks for my kayak and canoe. I
really liked the ideas of adding a piece from front to back to hold one edge
of a tarp fly! More to come......

hiker chick
02-05-2008, 07:37 AM
Made some changes to my E this snowed in weekend. With backseats removed
I cut two 1/4" thick boards, one to fit over the spare tire well and the other
to cover the front area. Over that I put down two closed cell foam pads (duct
taped together so they won't spread apart) and over that a piece of indoor/outdoor carpeting to fit the entire floor area. While I have have travelled tens of thousands of miles sleeping with the front seat reclined to the back I decided I would try sleeping on the floor as it is less conspicuous in certain
situations and far simpler to pull over and do. When I bought my E I purchased
the privacy curtains but having learned from the posts here I picked up a roll
of Reflectix. As mentioned in a previous post I have cut bulk screening (both
no see-um and regular mesh) to put over all the windows with many small
magnets. Last but not least (thanks again to this site) I decided to get rid
of all my piles of stuff and put things in various size larger plastic containers
that can be stacked for increased floor space while sleeping etc. Oh yes, one
more thing I learned here....I have Yakima racks for my kayak and canoe. I
really liked the ideas of adding a piece from front to back to hold one edge
of a tarp fly! More to come......

Impressive accomplishments for a single weekend! We'll look forward to pics of your camp setup. Especially the tarp setup.

:)

Miguel
02-06-2008, 05:29 PM
Been experimenting with a Hennessy Hammock for backcounty bike touring.
A little lighter than my solo tent, lighter yet if you are shorter than 6'. See all the models and compare => http://www.hennessyhammock.com/comparisonchart.html

Nice set up.Besides the comfort, the beauty of hammock camping is that you don't need level or smooth ground to hang it. I've slept on the sides of hills, across ravines and even over small streams. If by chance you can't find a suitable place to hang it (very rare) you can always set it up on the ground similar to a tent. Quality camping hammocks are light years away from the garden backyard variety most people are are familiar with. I personally use a Claytor Jungle hammock.

Miguel

csm
02-07-2008, 12:42 PM
my rei outlet table and kitchen set came today! how exciting. will set up a test camp in the living room.

hiker chick
02-13-2008, 11:02 PM
These videos (using my new handlebar-window camera-mount pictured below) are of Gidget running on the mall (bikejoring) last weekend. Took me the past three days to figure out how to edit and post them online. Discovered You Tube is a PITA and there are much better options, including Viddler.

Used my Canon Powershot (SD700is) camera on movie mode. You lose substantial video quality uploading online. On my computer these videos are much nicer looking. The audio works though. That is Gidget's distinctive yap in all it's eardrum-piercing glory! It's in her DNA.

Will be taking more videos in the coming weekends while it is still cold enough in DC to go bikejoring. Fortunately, it's cool enough year-round in the evenings and mornings where we camp in the Shenandoahs so will have campground bikejoring videos later in the spring, summer and fall.

:smile:


http://www.viddler.com/Gidgmom/videos/1/

http://www.viddler.com/Gidgmom/videos/2/

http://www.viddler.com/Gidgmom/videos/3/

http://www.viddler.com/Gidgmom/videos/4/





$24.75 (this is a great piece of equipment, excellent value! Designed for mounting on handlebars and car windows)

http://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Rev...771800&sr=8-41 (http://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Revolution-UltraClamp-Camera-Attachment/dp/B000IGCA5O/ref=sr_1_41?ie=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1202771800&sr=8-41)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41WMNC9AFYL._AA280_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B000IGCA5O/sr=8-41/qid=1202771800/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=3375251&s=sporting-goods&qid=1202771800&sr=8-41)

paulj
02-14-2008, 01:15 AM
I have that camera clamp. However, I've taken the swivel part off the clamp, and mounted it on a monopod. That's stored in the Element under the cargo platform, along with hiking sticks and tarp poles. But I keep forgetting to take it with me on hikes where it would most useful, namely hikes with waterfall views. Instead I usually end up finding a railing or log to steady the camera, so I can take longer exposures.

paulj

http://www.pbase.com/paulj3/image/80373717/medium.jpg http://www.pbase.com/paulj3/image/80373715/medium.jpg

hiker chick
02-14-2008, 07:04 AM
[quote=paulj;551944]I have that camera clamp. However, I've taken the swivel part off the clamp, and mounted it on a monopod. That's stored in the Element under the cargo platform, along with hiking sticks and tarp poles. But I keep forgetting to take it with me on hikes where it would most useful, namely hikes with waterfall views. Instead I usually end up finding a railing or log to steady the camera, so I can take longer exposures.

paulj
quote]

Paul -- have you looked at Gorillapods? About $20, you can get them on amazon.com or REI, etc. Really ingenious and handy. They weigh less than an ounce so I take mine everywhere! They easily contort to accomodate situating on a log, rocks. You can wrap it around a tree limb, railing, whatever. There's a bigger version for bigger cameras, such as SLRs.


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21YHsEsPWzL._AA200_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B000VRG0MY/sr=8-5/qid=1202990462/ref=dp_image_z_0?ie=UTF8&n=172282&s=electronics&qid=1202990462&sr=8-5)

tkobrian
02-15-2008, 01:21 PM
Paul -- have you looked at Gorillapods? About $20, you can get them on amazon.com or REI, etc. Really ingenious and handy. They weigh less than an ounce so I take mine everywhere! They easily contort to accomodate situating on a log, rocks. You can wrap it around a tree limb, railing, whatever. There's a bigger version for bigger cameras, such as SLRs.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21YHsEsPWzL._AA200_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B000VRG0MY/sr=8-5/qid=1202990462/ref=dp_image_z_0?ie=UTF8&n=172282&s=electronics&qid=1202990462&sr=8-5)

Those are great, I balance mine on rocks/boulders all the time. Super easy to get a level shot on something off camber without doing the ol' wedging rocks/sticks under the camera thing.

FrEEdom
02-16-2008, 10:36 AM
Gorillapods---- those things are awesome. I got one for my brother for his birthday a year ago, and he loves it.... i'm so jealous. I need to go get one.

protaganis
02-19-2008, 04:28 PM
Okay, just found this site and thought of HikerChick. Everything on the site runs on 12 volts (for her awesome teardrop). Gotta keep an eye out for my fellow GGM Rangers.:D
http://www.skingcompany.com/default.aspx

I just see her now, mini oven cooking away a hot meal for right after she gets camp set up, spotlight to scare off the skunks and car starter for if she forgets to turn one of the aforementioned off after the engines stopped running.;-)

hiker chick
02-19-2008, 07:27 PM
Okay, just found this site and thought of HikerChick. Everything on the site runs on 12 volts (for her awesome teardrop). Gotta keep an eye out for my fellow GGM Rangers.:D
http://www.skingcompany.com/default.aspx

I just see her now, mini oven cooking away a hot meal for right after she gets camp set up, spotlight to scare off the skunks and car starter for if she forgets to turn one of the aforementioned off after the engines stopped running.;-)

Thank you so much for thinking of me.

Going to take awhile to adequately peruse that website.

So I could run a plasma screen off 12 volts?

A Viking range?

:)

Junebug
02-20-2008, 08:09 PM
On the last REI sale, I picked up another side table for the campsite, figuring one could go in my tent (the SUV tent) and the other would stay by the campfire.

Aren't dividend checks coming soon? I want to pick up "silverware" and a couple dishwashing tubs.

B1ke Box
02-20-2008, 08:51 PM
REI's annual segway to spring => http://www.rei.com/shared/help/membership.html?storeId=8000#anchor2

"Dividend notices are mailed annually in late February to active members with eligible purchase activity for the previous year"

and they are even so kind to provide suggestions on how we might use the dividends ("Your search for "Ultralight Camping Gear" returned 236 products")

boley
02-20-2008, 08:58 PM
I have been following this thread for a while (yes I read the whole thing). Yesterday I was browsing REI and noted this item that Hiker Chick may wish to include in her gear fetish. It would go nicely with the bear spray.

http://media.rei.com/media/w/1259432.jpg


Counter Assault Electric Bear Fence

Protect your food and gear by keeping bears at bay with the Counter Assault Electric Bear Fence.

* 8,000 volts of electricity send a serious shock to any curious creature that gets too close
* Fence sets up easily with built-in posts; 43 sq. ft. pentagon shape provides ample room to stow coolers, backpacks and valuable gear
* First portable electric fence system to meet U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service specifications for alternative methods of food storage
* Packs up conveniently into the 6 x 41-inch storage bag included for easy transport
* Fence energizer requires six D batteries; four AA batteries are required to operate LED safety lights; all batteries sold separately
* Includes storage bag, volt meter, battery powered energizer, essential parts and operating instructions

Imported.

Item 761282

TheTimeTravelers
02-21-2008, 01:26 AM
Tent shopping is beyond stressful. I can't find a single tent I like that doesn't cost $300.
After 20 years of small backpacking tents we bought a giant REI Hobitat 6 Tent on sale last year (regular $299). It's great having a tent we can stand up inside.
http://www.rei.com/product/745759

hiker chick
02-21-2008, 06:31 AM
I have been following this thread for a while (yes I read the whole thing). Yesterday I was browsing REI and noted this item that Hiker Chick may wish to include in her gear fetish. It would go nicely with the bear spray.

http://media.rei.com/media/w/1259432.jpg

If that would keep skunks out, I'd go for it. :)

Skunks are scary. And abundant in Shenandoah NP.

:???:

hiker chick
02-21-2008, 06:33 AM
After 20 years of small backpacking tents we bought a giant REI Hobitat 6 Tent on sale last year (regular $299). It's great having a tent we can stand up inside.
http://www.rei.com/product/745759

I've thought those are so cool looking since they came out and have spent time touring them at REI. The steep walls would be nice and the abundant screening would be terrific in hot weather.

Have you experienced a thunderstorm while camping with it? How did it do?

My only hesitation with the Hobitat has been the incomplete fly coverage.

scorsone
02-21-2008, 08:57 AM
My Big Agnes Insulated Air Core Rectangular Pad is my new favorite camping item. It packs smaller than a Nalgene bottle and gives me tones of padding. It does not self inflate but it only takes a minute to blow it up. It is much better than my Thermarest pad and half the price. I got the short one because I am average hight and I don't notice when my feet hag off the end anyway. I picked mine up at Campmor for less than $50 on sale, normally I think they are around $60.

boley
02-21-2008, 10:31 AM
If that would keep skunks out, I'd go for it. :)

Skunks are scary. And abundant in Shenandoah NP.

:???:



I don't think a skunk would like it any more than a bear. :twisted:

In my few trips to the Shenandoah I was fortunate enough to avoid the skunks, although I did run across a few bears. Now that I live closer to the park (about 1 hour to Front Royal) I will have more occasion to visit the lil' stinkers.

protaganis
02-21-2008, 12:21 PM
Just for those who browse, I found a neat pair of sites.
http://www.steepandcheap.com/
http://www.whiskeymilitia.com/
They're kinda like an ongoing WOOT. One item after another. I just got a black diamond headlamp $24 (thanks to HC's commentary on their usefulness) and 3 pairs of hiking socks $6 each (gander had them for $16 a pair)
Anything that saves money (that way I can get more stuff):razz:

As for tents, kinda hard to beat the Kelty: Green River 4. I got one for about $240, I can stand in it (I'm 6' tall) and the fly is HUGE.

Hope this helps y'all

Avery
02-21-2008, 12:35 PM
protaganis - I love the Sandy area! But I think I love Sugarhouse just a bit more because everything is within a few blocks of me. Once it decides to stop snowing (and as of this morning, the earthquakes!) I'll be able to walk everywhere again. Can't beat that! I have yet to see the southern end of the state and that is my goal for this spring sometime. I like the St. Paul area but it just go to be too busy for me and I like how Salt Lake is much quieter.

The Time Travelers - Great tent! Love the colors! Unfortunately, it is a bit out of my price range. I really don't want to spend over $150 if I can help it.

I went to Sports Authority yesterday in search of the Kelty Yellowstone 4 and they didn't have it. I was kind of bummed out that they didn't have any of the tents set up so you could see how they look at full size. I'm just going to have to go to Cabelas this weekend.

protaganis
02-22-2008, 10:39 AM
Hey Avery, check out the Sportsman's Warehouse. I get about 75% of my gear there. They've always had the best deals I could find. When I got my tent Sports Authority wanted $100 more than I bought it for at SWs. REI is cheap enough that I tend to buy smaller specialty items, but I think even they charge more for the big stuff than SW.
http://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/store_locator.cfm?storeStateProv=UT

Either way, good luck.

B1ke Box
02-22-2008, 11:47 AM
Used to be a low double-digit dividend until I started following up on all of hiker chick's recommendations. Not sure what I'm going to do with the OllyDog Dog Pack, guess I'll have to get a dog.
Actually got an REI credit card and charged the replacement windows for the house on it. Very nice return.

Backcountry Edge
02-22-2008, 12:16 PM
I've thought those are so cool looking since they came out and have spent time touring them at REI. The steep walls would be nice and the abundant screening would be terrific in hot weather.

Have you experienced a thunderstorm while camping with it? How did it do?

My only hesitation with the Hobitat has been the incomplete fly coverage.




I borrowed a Hobbitat from a friend for a weekend. (before I worked in the gear business) We saw a little rain and the tent performed the way I would expect a single / double wall hybrid tent to perform, i.e. keep all you gear away from the walls! The rain we got was not a driving rain, so I cannot speak to whether the tents unconventional fly coverage is effective for a driving rain. All in all I found it to be a very roomy tent and certainly a bargain for their pricing.

I ended up buying a Marmot Halo 4 (still about a year before working in gear). The walls are nearly vertical due to the "halo" pole system. While it does not have the stand up room of the hobbitat, it does have full fly coverage and dual doors and vestibules. There is some great venting built into the tent and the fly that has proven to be very useful when holed up for the weekend by rain. It is also available in a 6 person variant, but it is just me the girl and the dog, so the 4 is more than enough room. It is definitely not my backpacking tent, but it honestly gets more use than my backpacking tent.

Junebug
02-22-2008, 02:26 PM
Has anyone tried this coffee press (http://www.rei.com/product/745004?vcat=REI_SEARCH)? It sure has great customer reviews, on Amazon too.

My french press will make its first outing this year and I'm excited but this one looks pretty cool/fast/easy/good.

hiker chick
02-22-2008, 02:50 PM
Has anyone tried this coffee press (http://www.rei.com/product/745004?vcat=REI_SEARCH)? It sure has great customer reviews, on Amazon too.

My french press will make its first outing this year and I'm excited but this one looks pretty cool/fast/easy/good.

That's new to me. Interesting. Looks like some sort of beaker from science class.

It uses paper filters so that would probably take it off my list. I'm not so discerning as to notice a taste difference and wouldn't want to keep up with storing filters.

:confused:

Junebug
02-22-2008, 04:07 PM
But they are wee tiny and wouldn't take much room. :)

scorsone
02-22-2008, 04:33 PM
That sounds like a decent coffee press. I picked a different one up for camping and it's pretty much junk. I might have to give that one a try. I do like to stay on the more compact side of camping and have been using the MSR Mug Mate coffee filter device but the quality of the brew is always depressing.

I don't like the idea of filters to take with me for camping but it would make for a smoother cup o' joe. A few in a plastic baggie wouldn't really add much bulk to the kitchen sack.

If somebody gets one or has one already please let us know how it works.

tkobrian
02-22-2008, 06:22 PM
somewhere back like 50 pages I posted a link for my camping expresso maker...flat out the best cup of coffee you'll get outdoors. I've literally used it at home when the power was out. It's a simple compact all aluminum & brass device so it's practically unbreakable, durable, cleans up easily, and never gives gritty coffee. I think it's a GCI and they sell at campmor.com Only problem is it's not a huge volume for multi coffee drinkers.

Wanna up that patronage refund, get the REI Visa. With all my biking/camping equipment I rarely fly and have no use for air miles. I run most of my household bills on the card so I get something great every year with the added patronage refund paired with their 20% off sale. :-D

This summer we're actually flying up to Vermont for a wedding so I might get a Thule bike box so I can ship my bike. Then I can rent it out to my bike club friends 8)

hiker chick
02-22-2008, 06:36 PM
Brian -- I believe this is what you're referring to?


GSI Espresso Maker - 4 Cup

$24.95 Item 401040theprice = "$24.95" ;
http://images.rei.com/media/401040Lrg.jpg

tkobrian
02-22-2008, 08:33 PM
Brian -- I believe this is what you're referring to?

That's it! Thanks HC. I love that thing.

My last big biking/camping trip was last May so when we went RV'ng in November w/the inlaws I grabbed it from my camping bucket. Apparently in my haste to hit the road 7 months earlier I threw it in the bucket dirty (ACK!) and it still had grounds & water in it. :-o Well the water from the last campground must have been full of minerals so there was a nice funky layer of white crust inside. The mother-in-law took one look and flat refused to use it, so it was weak coffee all week. :| Got it home, ran a little CLR in it...bam good as knew. Tough little sucker!

hiker chick
02-25-2008, 07:49 AM
LL Bean this morning unveiled their new camping gear for '08 -- online. Nothing revolutionary that I can see but some interesting new items for them including the Eureka Copper Canyon tents and Eureka Breezeway screenroom (I prefer the Northern Breeze). There's a neat looking Coleman chair with built-in table, too.

http://www.llbean.com/

Junebug
02-25-2008, 01:47 PM
There's a neat looking Coleman chair with built-in table, too.

http://www.llbean.com/

If it's the chair I'm thinking of, my local Costco is stocking them. Having just bought a second table, I couldn't justify it. :rolleyes:

protaganis
02-25-2008, 01:59 PM
After having seen HC's little furry friend vids, I saw these...
http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/andmore_home/tortured/42173.aspx?feature=Product_3

Imagine Gidget cruising in her shades :cool: (They also protect against UV)

Avery
02-25-2008, 02:23 PM
REI UPDATE:

The 20 % coupon that accompanies the dividend is now available for online purchases !!! :D

Coupon code is MEMDEAL . . . good until 3/30/08.


Thanks for mentioning that. Now I can get my tent! I decided on the Kelty Yellowstone 4. I was able to get to Sportsmans Warehouse and check out the tents they had there. I think it will do just nicely, though the windows are smaller than I would have liked. It gets hot out here in the summer and I just whine. :rolleyes:

protaganis
02-25-2008, 03:27 PM
Hey Avery, if your not good with too warm.
http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=830A550&categoryid=5900

These work great and last a couple of nights on the batteries. We use one in our tent and E (I need the fan sound to sleep well) Hope that helps.

paulj
02-25-2008, 03:34 PM
I like the Coleman Zephyr fan. The batteries last longer than several nights, though some nights I just use it at the start, when interior temperatures are above 70.

Given the size and shape, it is hard to find a good place to store it while traveling. I usually nestle it in blankets near a rear side window, behind other cargo.

Then there is the question of where to place it when sleeping. For general air circulation, I hang it from a grab handle above the passenger door. I can also set it on its side on top of a duffle.

Also, I replaced the plastic hanging hook with a reusable zip tie. I've tried hanging it from tent fabric using the magnet.

paulj

Beer
02-25-2008, 03:52 PM
Speaking of Coleman, I have a neat little trick for the Coleman.com web store.

Enter in the code FAMILY at the store and it grants the family and friends discount on most things on the site. From what I've seen the discount varies, but is up to 50%.

I was hesitant about using it, however I picked it up from the flashlight guys over at candle power forums. One of the guys there is a rep for coleman, and his responce was basically "Well, if we didn't want you to use it we'd just change the code or take it down."

A lot of cool stuff at colemans site. :-D

hiker chick
02-25-2008, 05:04 PM
Speaking of Coleman, I have a neat little trick for the Coleman.com web store.

Enter in the code FAMILY at the store and it grants the family and friends discount on most things on the site. From what I've seen the discount varies, but is up to 50%.

I was hesitant about using it, however I picked it up from the flashlight guys over at candle power forums. One of the guys there is a rep for coleman, and his responce was basically "Well, if we didn't want you to use it we'd just change the code or take it down."

A lot of cool stuff at colemans site. :-D

Interesting, thanks! I was on Coleman's web page the other night and was struck by how ridiculously high-priced their coolers were -- way, way more than I had spent for one from REI.

hiker chick
02-25-2008, 05:06 PM
After having seen HC's little furry friend vids, I saw these...
http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/andmore_home/tortured/42173.aspx?feature=Product_3

Imagine Gidget cruising in her shades :cool: (They also protect against UV)

:-P LOL - Gidget has Doggles because I used to have a convertible. The Doggles didn't last as long as the booties (which lasted half a block before she'd high-stepped them all off).

Perhaps she'd prefer Maui Jims.

:)

Junebug
02-25-2008, 05:12 PM
Enter in the code FAMILY at the store and it grants the family and friends discount on most things on the site. From what I've seen the discount varies, but is up to 50%.

Invalid coupon code. :(

Back to searching for deals via rei-outlet. :)

Beer
02-25-2008, 05:27 PM
Invalid coupon code. :(

Back to searching for deals via rei-outlet. :)

LOL...click on the "Family Store" Link at the top, it will ask you for the password. The pasword is "Family"

I should have been more specific, it's been awhile since I have done this. :D

Beer
02-25-2008, 05:31 PM
Interesting, thanks! I was on Coleman's web page the other night and was struck by how ridiculously high-priced their coolers were -- way, way more than I had spent for one from REI.

Yeah before the Family discount they are Waaaay high, I just checked though. That sweet stainless steel belted cooler that coleman makes is $149 at REI, with the code it's $115 from Coleman. Don't know about shipping though.

Linkys:

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=6155B707&categoryid=8501

http://www.rei.com/product/675648

EDIT: Looks like w/shipping and tax from coleman it's $134.00

EDIT #2 : Looks like even w/ the code they are still not the cheapest http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009PVTLK

The best deals I have found are on their lighting products

Farther
02-25-2008, 07:34 PM
Try www.walmart.com for the stainless coleman cooler. I got it for $99 including shipping to a Walmart. No sales tax in Oregon too.

Just checked, they are up to $110 now.

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=1224701

Beer
02-25-2008, 07:50 PM
Thanks, I have wanted one for a very long time. I'm still having trouble justifying a $100+ cooler to my self. Especially when as the family grows it will end up being to small. :-(

Beer
02-26-2008, 01:01 AM
Playing around on Colemans site I found this:

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=5998-334&categoryid=26006

There has been alot of talk about a mat for the car as well here:

http://www.elementownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=43130

I'm thinking for $17 It may be worth trying :D

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/images/products/5998-334_a.jpg

paulj
02-26-2008, 02:25 AM
At 41" wide, it might fit the Element floor perfectly. Twin mattresses are nominally 39" wide, and leave an annoying gap.

paulj

B1ke Box
02-26-2008, 01:10 PM
I've used this mattress along with the 12v inflater for the last couple of years. The one issue I've had is puncturing the mattress when closing the rear door. I'd patched it a couple of times with bike inner tube patches. Definitely a low cost solution and rolls up into a small package when not it use.

Beer
02-26-2008, 02:17 PM
I wonder if they have updated the design or changed it somehow? On the coleman site they list it as "New for 2008!"

If it is a redesign I hope that fixes the clearance issues with the door. :D

B1ke Box
02-26-2008, 03:18 PM
I have the 74" x 39" Wrap and Roll Twin Air Bed => http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=5998M300&categoryid=10080
I'm sure if I was a little more careful I would not have gotten the extra experience of finding and patching the puncture.

Beer
02-26-2008, 03:25 PM
Well I think we may have a winner then, Coleman list the SUV bed as 70 x 41 vs 74 x 39 for the twin.

so there should be no pinching issues, AND it should fill the space between the rear cubbys. :grin:

Backcountry Edge
02-26-2008, 03:26 PM
I wonder if they have updated the design or changed it somehow? On the coleman site they list it as "New for 2008!"

If it is a redesign I hope that fixes the clearance issues with the door. :D

probably went to p.v.c. free or more earth friendly materials. seemed to be the theme this year at the Outdoor retailer show. I will have to check around the office for their catalog to confirm my speculation

sportcat
02-26-2008, 03:28 PM
I have found Wal-Mart to have excellent prices on Coleman air mattresses.

Beer
02-26-2008, 03:59 PM
Funny you should say that, I was just thinking that I may wait untill I can get this in a store. Seems like nearly every wal-mart, k-mart, target ect... in the country stocks coleman airmattresses. Seems really silly to me to have to ship one.

But...














If they dont show up on shelves soon, thats excatly what i'll do. :D

B1ke Box
02-26-2008, 04:51 PM
I got mine at Sports Authority, but that was before I discovered REI.

Whisper
02-27-2008, 03:36 PM
Does anyone use a camping cot (or two) on the floor of the Element? Seems then some stuff could still fit under the cot and one would not require a platform.

scorsone
02-27-2008, 03:56 PM
I have never used my cot in the E and I would have to double check measurements on it but I think it could work for at least one. I suggested this in the "living in the E" thread instead of making a platform.

paulj
02-27-2008, 06:22 PM
Cabelas lists quite a few cots.

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/index/index-display.jsp?id=cat20146&navAction=jump&navCount=1&cmCat=MainCatcat20075&parentType=category&parentId=cat20075

The question is whether the dimensions are workable. If the front seat backs fold forward (earlier models) you might be able to fit a cot that is longer than 72". Assuming the cot feet occupy the same width as the top, you are limited to one cot, or two that are 20" wide. 24" seems to be more typical.

To set up camp, I imagine you have to clear out the floor, set up the cots outside the car, insert them, and then squeeze gear past and around the cot legs. With practice you may be able to preposition the gear so you can just set the cot on top of it. Taller cots give more storage, but less headroom, and v.v.

Of hand, I don't think cots add much convenience.

paulj

hiker chick
02-27-2008, 06:32 PM
I have a couple of those Cabelas cots. They are not easy to set up. I have to sit on the floor and put my feet against the cot legs to stretch the canvas enough to set it up. I couldn't do it in the E and wouldn't want to do it on the ground.

They are comfy, though. Agree with Paul, not the best available option.

:)

Whisper
02-27-2008, 07:08 PM
Good information - thanks! I don't even own an element yet but think it will be my next vehicle and this forum is great! (yes - I have read this entire thread now and am a few dollars poorer):)

B1ke Box
02-27-2008, 09:42 PM
Before I switched to the Coleman Wrap and Roll (see post 893) I used the Byer Tri-Lite Folding Cot (74 in. long x 25 in. wide) I take on bike event tours. The reason I use it in the tent is to compensate for the irregular ground below, which is not an issue in the E. Quicker to inflate the air mattress with a 12v pump and the rear outlet in the E than assemble the cot.

hiker chick
03-02-2008, 07:12 PM
Have been re-tooling camp lists and gear boxes to reflect the new teardrop trailer regime for '08. The teardrop is in storage out near the mountains where we usually camp. Want to get the organizing to the point where all I have to take from my home in DC is a cooler and Gidget's food. Everything else would already be in the teardrop (including clothes, boots, backpack...) so we have only to hitch it up and and be on our way.

In that quest, today I literally dusted off one of my acquisitions from the early 90's when I began compiling gear. A brown metal "chuck box." I purchased mine from Campmor circa-1994, or so. Seems they don't carry them anymore. But Cabela's does. I'm not recommending buying one as it is quite expensive ($160 at Cabelas, just for the box, and that is absurd). Pretty sure I spent about $90 for the same thing 14 years ago -- they don't call it "inflation" for nothing.) The Cabela's version has been reviewed by a few customers, only one of them favorably. Perhaps they aren't making them like they used to...

I do like the 4-compartment utensil tray, shelving and the work surface on top. Mine is sturdy. In Googling "chuck box" I discovered that it is a common Boy Scout thing to build them -- bigger ones -- out of wood. It certainly is a worthy project for someone so skilled and inclined.

Below is a list of everything I have in mine at this point. Looks like all I'll need -- kitchenwise -- for 3-4 people is what's in this box, a separate Rubbermaid container with java presses, mugs, etc., and my grill baskets, camp stove-propane and cooler.

This chuck box will be kept with the teardrop.


http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/images/spacer.gif http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/images/spacer.gif http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/images/spacer.gif http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/content/Pod/00/38/39/p003839vr01.jpg http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/images/spacer.gif http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/images/cabelasLogo.gif Camper's Chuck Box
Organize your camp cookware with a Cabela's Chuck Box. Designed with 24-gauge metal, our functional chuck boxes measure a handy 22" x 11" x 14". Purchase the box alone, or order it fully stocked with utensils and serving ware. Two side handles make it easy to carry, and a lockable latch protects food from animals. Formicaż work surface serves as a cutting board but also has space for a two-burner camp stove. Removable wing extensions give extra counter space and store conveniently when not in use. You also have a four-compartment silverware tray, shelf space and a paper towel holder. Boxes also include a magnetic four-hook utility rack and cook kit storage compartment.

CHUCK BOX
MSR pots (2 sets)
Skillet
Metal bowls w/handles
Chinette paper platters
collander/bowl
knives/forks/spoons
steak knives, serving forks & spoons
corn cob pokers, roasting forks
wine opener, bottle opener, can opener
spatula, wooden spoons, whisks
paper towels
foil, zip-lock bags, twisties
soap, sponge, pot scraper, dish towels
oragami plates-cutting boards
tablecloth, clamps
PAM high-temp cooking spray
salt & pepper, lemon pepper, Montreal steak seasoning, BBQ Grill Mates
garbage bags

COFFEE BOX
Java press + mugs + kettle
Coffee & Tea
Sugar, blue stuff

GROCERY BAG
Nuts, crackers, chips/salsa
Soup
Bread & French loaf
oranges
marshmallows

COOLER
[ FROZEN WATER BOTTLES ]
½ & ½
Butter & garlic
cheese
boiled eggs (pre-cook)
Steak/salmon/chicken (marinate)
Asparagus
Wild rice & pine nuts & artichoke hearts (prepared)
Potato salad (prepared – coarse mustard recipe)
Tuna/mayo/pickles/onions (prepared)
pop + iced tea

protaganis
03-03-2008, 12:10 PM
Okay, the timing of your post is a little spooky. Last night my wife and I were talking about what we'd need in our food prep box. This morning I log on to see this post... I think your status has gone up to either "Patron Saint of the E Camper" or "Wilderness Goddess". Thanks for the list HC. As always, your timing is perfect.

In other, mostly related news, I found another forum that I think would be a great supplement to this one.
http://www.edcforums.com/
It's called Every Day Carry. For those who carry Flashlights, Multi-tools, Knives...etc. I got it on high recommends from a friend who's a member, been perusing it and have found some cool camping and everyday goodies as well as some neat info on belt pouches and methods of carrying gear.
Enjoy.

Whisper
03-03-2008, 06:07 PM
I built one and it is great for truck camping but too heavy to lift onto the legs when full so I have to pack the heavier items into a rubbermaid roughneck. It is great once it is set up though.

http://www.troop168.net/forms/patrolboxb.htm

Avery
03-03-2008, 09:18 PM
I think I have found a new favorite camping thing. I was up in Park City today and ran into Starbucks for a caffeine fix. I noticed at my local SB they had smaller versions of the Cranium board game. It is a huge favorite in my family. I thought about buying them but I didn't want to pay full price. Well, at this particular shop they were marked down to $3.99 each. The girl said that they were dying to sell them, so I got both for $3.99! I was pumped.

I know they'll be great on camping trips if we're stuck inside in the rain. Plus I'll be camping with some kids and they'll like having a few games to play. Plus they're not really big so packing shouldn't be a problem.

hiker chick
03-03-2008, 09:30 PM
Protaganis -- "Wilderness Goddess" works for me, thanks. ;-) Will try that out on camping compadres. Clearly, great minds... Am so ready for the weekend camp getaways to start back up. At least the list-mania is productive.

Whisper -- that chuck box blueprint looks great. Wish I'd thought of this (and several other projects) when my woodworking genius grandfather were still alive. We would have had fun building it together.

Avery -- I haven't played Cranium but you reminded me how much fun my sister and I had as kids playing Yahtzee with my grandmother -- including a few times on camping trips with them (in their motorhome and travel trailers -- Nana and Papa always had some RV).

Ah, childhood camping memories... everyone should have some.

:)

wolfhounder
03-04-2008, 09:29 AM
yes i have that cranium game. it is the size of your fist and is on a key chain. we use ours for back country it is hillarious. the little cards are the size of your fingernail.. haha. Pass the Pigs is another GREAT outback game!!

jcskolman
03-04-2008, 11:48 AM
My favorite camping game is ...


UNO...

mmm...Draw four wild card!

Beer
03-05-2008, 11:01 AM
I might get to do some bar parking lot camping while I'm down there:)

Nice.

I got to do a little of that myself last weekend. :twisted:

hiker chick
03-08-2008, 08:43 AM
Obviously a big part of car camping is the driving. And with the Element as gear box, being organized while parked is an issue, too. While the Element has a lot of great nooks and crannies to store things I have longed for the ability to keep all the frequently-used small stuff organized in one spot, easily retrievable from the driver seat and portable.

In the past year I've become acquainted with a Wisconsin business called Duluth Trading. Am now a big fan of many of their products and also their customer service -- especially the quick shipping. They have an interesting array of items, much of it under their own Duluth Trading brand. This is not an outdoor recreation store but because it is directed in large part at people who work outdoors in construction trades there is considerable focus on weather resistance, durability and organization. And there is some gadget crossover with REI.

Among their organizers that is a recent acquisition and a great help to me is this "mobile desk." I'm using it for the items I want to be able to easily grab while driving or while camped, such as: camera, binoculars, cell phone, Blackberry, chargers, Gorillapod, knives, GPS, flashlight. It's also where I'm storing the documentation for all our camping reservations (12 so far, through Labor Day) and Gidget's health record & rabies certificate. When parked at the campground, this will sit on the center of the dashboard. It has lots of pockets and the inside compartment is divisible with movable dividers. When driving alone, it sits on whatever I have in the passenger seat, often atop a cooler. With a passenger, it can sit sideways on the floor in front of the subwoofer. It's 14"x11"x6" -- not too big but organizes quite a bit of small stuff.

Duluth Trading is a great company and I highly recommend checking them out. :)

http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/department/organizers_bags/organizers_bags2/vehicleorganizers/14559.aspx?feature=Complex_Link_11

Mobile Desk rides shotgun, has clipboard writing surface

hiker chick
03-08-2008, 08:57 AM
Other organizers from Duluth Trading that I'll be using in the Element for road trips from now on: the Cab Commander, Back Seat Buddy and Totezilla (a sturdy beast of a tote bag).

Cab Commander
http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/department/organizers_bags/organizers_bags2/vehicleorganizers/82049.aspx?feature=Product_1

http://www.duluthtrading.com/data/shared/media/images/decorative/newicon.gif Back Seat Buddy gets your rear in gear
[ this will be holding all the trail maps and trail books that have taken up one of the Element's back doors. ]
http://www.duluthtrading.com/search/searchresults/82063.aspx?feature=Product_1&kw=back+seat+buddy


Carries 100+ lbs. of gear. So tough, it's "Totezilla"!
http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/department/organizers_bags/organizers_bags2/duffelbags/22637.aspx?feature=Link_11

SoloRider
03-08-2008, 12:07 PM
I love DTC! In fact I just got one of these a few days ago:

Plan Station (http://www.duluthtrading.com/search/searchresults/22668.aspx?feature=Product_7&kw=plan)

(for the jobsite, not for inside the E)

I also have the mobile desk, I used it in my company truck when I lived in Phoenix and it worked great. I don't really like it so much in E though. It's just taking up space nowadays, if someone local wants it, come and get it

Farther
03-08-2008, 12:22 PM
I use the cab commander with the insulated pack on the opposite side of the seat in my department vehicle. I don't think the insulated bag is still available. My spouse (Doc Farther) carries the Duluth Trading tire knocker in the Element. Works great to check the tires on our camping utility trailer, as well as other purposes.

http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/andmore_home/andmore_truckcarstuff/18TK.aspx?feature=Product_2

paulj
03-08-2008, 12:36 PM
I used to have a seat back organizer on the driver's side, but then realized that it was adding to the camp setup/take down time. Since it attached to the headrest, I had to fold it up when taking off the headrest to lower the seat back for sleeping. So I found other places to store things (mostly dog related), and removed it.

There are a number of little things like this that I've eliminated, or changed, to streamline the changeover between driving and camping configurations.

paulj

hiker chick
03-09-2008, 07:42 PM
Gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous dog! I'm a huge fan of Sammies (I'm a husky owner myself).
Great set up. Where did you get your roof rack from?

Fantastic pictures and set ups - I love the camping container idea for always staying packed.

Welcome to EOC, Denali!

This might be a first: I cannot remember who I bought the Loadwarrior from (was three years ago). I do remember that it was an online store, that I was not impressed with their service and that I vowed not to buy anything else from them. And I haven't, so I've forgotten.

These days I mostly use the Loadwarrior for lugging bundles of firewood at campgrounds.

Because it cuts your gas mileage (a couple mpg, at least) and it's expensive to begin with... I'm not sure I'd highly recommend it again unless you absolutely need to put stuff on the roof.

It does what it's meant to do -- carry stuff -- and quite well. Stays secure to the roof rack. It's certainly well constructed.

And Gidget (my Samoyed) thanks you for the compliment.

What color Husky do you have?

:)

hiker chick
03-10-2008, 08:29 PM
My favorite chair is on sale at LL Bean for $29 (normally $49)

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?page=wilderness-recliner&categoryId=55872&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1&parentCategory=503992&cat4=503991&shop_method=pp&feat=503992-tn

GaryS
03-10-2008, 09:14 PM
Speaking of chairs...

This (http://www.slinglight.com/) is my favorite camping chair. I bought mine almost twenty years ago for only ten bucks less than they sell for today.

Ah, it brings back memories... Setting on the beach at North Padre in my Sling Light chair, beer in one hand and a good book in the other. Now, that's a vacation!

hiker chick
03-11-2008, 06:46 AM
Speaking of chairs...

This (http://www.slinglight.com/) is my favorite camping chair. I bought mine almost twenty years ago for only ten bucks less than they sell for today.

Ah, it brings back memories... Setting on the beach at North Padre in my Sling Light chair, beer in one hand and a good book in the other. Now, that's a vacation!

Weighs just a tad more than a beer.... my favorite chair can't make that claim. ;-)



http://www.slinglight.com/images/SLCOLORSHTWEB.jpg
The ultimate backpack camp chair!
Chair weight.18 oz. the same weight as a 16 oz. can of beer.
Headrest weighs an additional 4 oz. NEW PRICE $89.95

hiker chick
03-15-2008, 05:33 PM
Exploring the Teardrop Trailer world has opened up another realm:

Dutch Oven cooking.

So I'm now studying recipes and compiling the gear (there's not much unless you start collecting pots).

Dutch Ovens and camp cooking are so beloved in the teardrop community that the premier teardrop forum has a section entitled: Cast Iron.

http://www.mikenchell.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=44

Here's another helpful link that a teardropper recommends and which I find useful:

http://marksblackpot.blogspot.com/

Here's a thread I recently started there in search of a good Dutch Oven cookbook. Turns out that the forum last year pooled recipes and came up with a heck of a nice (and big) cookbook, which I have printed, hole-punched and put in a 3-ring binder. This thread includes the PDF:

http://www.mikenchell.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=22234

And there's a new spinoff forum from the teardrop forum that's focused solely on camp cooking. It's getting off to a strong start:

http://www.camp-cook.com/

An excellent thread on getting geared up:

http://www.camp-cook.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=24

And from the same author, basic Dutch Oven cooking techniques

http://www.camp-cook.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=25

So here's the Lodge Dutch Oven that I've ordered from REI and am having shipped to the store to avoid shipping cost (the thing weighs 23 pounds). Lodge is an old American company and highly recommended in the Dutch Oven community. A 12" diameter Lodge is considered a great starting oven and there are two variations of the 12": 8-quart and 6-quart. Experienced Dutch Oven cooks preparing multiple dishes (which can include biscuits and cakes) stack Dutch Ovens. That's one reason they recommend starting with a 12" -- you can later acquire a 10" and 8" and stack them. An efficient use of coals.

The legs on the bottom are to allow briquettes to fit underneath and the lip on the lid is to keep briquettes from sliding off the top and to keep ashes from falling into the pot when the lid is lifted.

http://www.rei.com/product/714247

Lodge Logic Deep Dutch Oven - 8 Quart

paulj
03-15-2008, 05:45 PM
I bought a Lodge 8" (2 qt) DO several years ago, and have used it for baking while camping, mainly biscuits, cornbread, and a few cobblers and pot pies. More recently I bought a 10" GSI hard anodized aluminum DO. It's a bit larger (3 qts), but packs more compactly. It has a flat bottom, using a wire stand when used with coals. It's proven to be even more useful at home than camping, since it works a general purpose braising and baking dish.

I normally only cook for 2, so don't need a larger DO. I pack the DO along with related gear in an 8 gallon RM plastic container. Extra gear includes a lid stand, vice grips to lift the lid, welders gloves, a small folding wood stove that I use as charcoal starter, and several bags of charcoal (about 20 briquets/meal), tongs for handling coals, and a pie pan to use as a base. Usually I have additional space for baking mix and some spare bottles of water.

A more recent purchase was a small pressure cooker, the 1.5L Hawkins (India) model that REI carries. It gives me the option of cooking tougher meats without using much fuel or time. It is small enough to work with my Swedish Trangia alcohol cook stove set. So far I've used it at home, but not on a camping trip.

My camp cooking is simpler than at home. I don't pack all that many spices and sauces, I don't travel with a large cooler, so that means a limited amount of fresh meat, and little space for leftovers. And I like to keep cleanup simple, due to limited water and water disposal options. Plus, after supper we like to hike (in the summer), or hit the sack (in the winter).

paulj

hiker chick
03-15-2008, 06:14 PM
I was surprised to see this at Cabelas, listed under "Camp Essentials."

Heck, I don't have one.

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?id=0052366627477a&navCount=40&podId=0052366&parentId=cat20093&masterpathid=&navAction=jump&cmCat=MainCatcat20075-cat20093&catalogCode=2UG&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat20093&hasJS=true

:cool:

Farther
03-15-2008, 10:07 PM
my Swedish Trangia alcohol cook stove set. paulj

Man, I love my Trangia. I use the Westwind set-up and carry a wind screen wrapped around the Trangia fuel bottle. The Trangia came with me for 1500 miles on the AT. I carried a Sigg Firejet white gas stove for the other 500. The Sigg is a great little stove, unfortunately it is no longer manufactured and parts are non-existant.

BXGR8R
03-16-2008, 10:45 PM
I have loved DO cooking since I was in the Scouts. My favorite thing that I do with it is Biscuits and Gravy all at the same time. I just make the gravy, then drop the biscuit dough right on top, put the lid on with some coals and bake until the biscuits get brown. I have used Bisquick, the tube biscuits and frozen biscuit pucks all with pretty good results.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21ebwniRRIL._AA200_.jpg

I use one of these and really like it. It makes it very easy to take the lid off without dumping coals into whatever you got cooking.

DOGBOX
03-16-2008, 11:22 PM
Can you use the dutch ovens on a propane stove--like a Coleman?

Box4Rox
03-17-2008, 01:14 AM
Can you use the dutch ovens on a propane stove--like a Coleman?

Yes . . . but carefully. You can use a diffused burner for recipes requiring only bottom heat like stews and chili . . .

Here's a pic of chili verde cooking away on a Camp Chef single burner. Note the perforated round steel diffuser plate I added on top of the burner . . . the three DO legs sit on the diffuser and you don't have direct flame-to-DO contact :wink:



http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b91/Obi_the_dog/Teardrop/DOCampchef.jpg

paulj
03-17-2008, 01:32 AM
The big one that HC showed is meant for use with coals. It has 3 short legs. You set it over a bed of coals, load it up, and put more coals on top. This gives the all around heat effect of an oven, allowing you to make biscuits, cakes, and cobblers in it. You can also use it with just bottom heat, for stews and chicken fried steak (e.g. chuck wagon competition food).

Typical proportions for baking are 6 to 8 briquettes underneath and 10 to 12 on the lid. The actual number depends on the size of the pot, and the desired heat.

I've used my small 'legged' one in the home oven, just letting the legs stick through the oven grate. The Coleman gas stove has a wire grate above the burners, doesn't it? If so, a DO could used on that. The legs might get in the way on other stove tops.

The smallest GSI aluminum DO does work on a stove top, since it doesn't have integral legs.

Dutch Oven is also used for any baking pot with a reasonably well sealing lid. For home cooking these are often enameled cast iron, and may be oval in shape (Le Creuset). These are great for braising meat. But to use coals in camp, you need one with a rimmed lid.

paulj

chuckwagon supply has a large selection of gear and information (though I haven't ordered from them)
http://www.chuckwagonsupply.com/index.html

Box4Rox
03-17-2008, 09:46 AM
Another good place for DO stuff (like carry bags):


http://www.ahappycamper.com/products/doacc/totebags/cbudo.jpg

http://www.ahappycamper.com/

Box4Rox
03-20-2008, 12:01 PM
Another Camp Chef accessory that I'll be trying this camping season:

(might even leave the dutch oven home and eat chicken 6 days in a row at the EOC Yellowstone campout this August . . . :wink: )

http://www.campchef.com/sites/campchef/images/gallery/slpkeg.jpg


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK_jKKi5Cxw

hiker chick
03-21-2008, 08:53 AM
Another Camp Chef accessory that I'll be trying this camping season:

(might even leave the dutch oven home and eat chicken 6 days in a row at the EOC Yellowstone campout this August . . . :wink: )

http://www.campchef.com/sites/campchef/images/gallery/slpkeg.jpg


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK_jKKi5Cxw


The significance of this kitchen gear came to light when I saw the name of it: The Keg Roaster.

The headless chickens sitting on beer cans are amusing.

And, I gather, tasty.

:)

Backcountry Edge
03-21-2008, 11:15 AM
I have been intrigued by this thing ever since I saw it at Home Depot about a week ago. Orion Cooker (http://orionoutdoors.com/products/cooker/) They claim some really impressive cooking times and being that my gas grill has ceased to be.... this thing is looking really attractive for home and car camping. I would have to bet that it could be placed right on top of the coals in a campfire.


if anyone has tried one, please let me know.

paulj
03-21-2008, 11:35 PM
Do you think this would fit in the back of an Element?
http://www.hansenwheel.com/store/images/cowboys_chuckbox_lg.jpg

http://www.hansenwheel.com/store/product.cfm?cat_id=5&subcat_id=18&product_id=119
Deluxe Chuckbox

Movieman990
03-22-2008, 12:32 AM
....not when it costs over $1,800 !

I don't care how fitted that poplar wood is, that's a lot of "dough".

hiker chick
03-23-2008, 08:07 PM
A Lodge Cast Iron catalogue I had requested arrived while we were gone.

Highly recommend getting the catalogue. It's free. Lots of potential cast iron car camping kitchen gear in there... reasonably priced, too. Find a deal on shipping (Amazon has some free shipping deals) or at a local store.

Here's the link to get the catalogue:

http://www.lodgemfg.com/catalog.asp

I first became acquainted with Lodge by getting some of their enamel cast iron for home -- the "Color" series. Years ago someone had given me a small Le Creuset pot which I love but flinched at adding to because of the exorbitant prices. The Lodge "Color" series is essentially a Le Creuset knockoff (at a fraction of the cost!). I can't tell the difference cooking with them. Can hardly tell the difference to look at them. Love these pots, so easy to clean. The color pots aren't for camping, though. They also sell traditional non-enamel cast iron and a version that is pre-seasoned -- the camping stuff.

https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/products1.asp?idDept=1433&menu=color

Rocket Dog
04-02-2008, 12:02 PM
I was finally assimilated. Joined REI during my last purchase (a headlamp, tandem camp chair, and .....something else I don't remember)

EDIT: Life Is Good T shirts on sale. http://www.rei.com/REI-Outlet/product/767049

B1ke Box
04-02-2008, 09:07 PM
That's great Ted, REI is a member group, and as such you may ask them to carry items of interest. I asked them to carry the Rocket Dog line of camp leisure shoes, but haven't heard back from them yet. I've almost worn out the pair I got locally a few months ago.

Miguel
04-08-2008, 01:53 AM
Man, I love my Trangia. I use the Westwind set-up and carry a wind screen wrapped around the Trangia fuel bottle. The Trangia came with me for 1500 miles on the AT. I carried a Sigg Firejet white gas stove for the other 500. The Sigg is a great little stove, unfortunately it is no longer manufactured and parts are non-existant.

I also have a Trangia and absolutely love it. Ever notice they don't sell repair kits for Trangias?:D I use the Clickstand as my support....I like it better than the one in your photo....although that is a good one. It's the KISS method of cooking and has never failed me...short of running it over with the Element, how can it.

Miguel

Speedy Toaster Dave
04-08-2008, 05:52 AM
nice shoe's how much are they?...:D

B1ke Box
04-09-2008, 08:47 PM
nice shoe's how much are they?...:D

See => http://www.amazon.com/Rocket-Dog-Beige-Brown-Plaid/dp/B0013D2A0Q/ref=sr_1_49?ie=UTF8&s=apparel&qid=1207787885&sr=1-49
$36.45. I got mine on mark down at the Langley AFB Exchange for about 1/2. Not sure if I loved them to death or they just died young, as they only lasted about 4 months, or even less than I averaged with three pairs of Crocs.
My Keens are too heavy to take on a bike tour as after ride / camp shoes (Although I just got a pair of Keen bike sandals that I've only worn about 20 miles, but will be wearing this weekend on Cycle North Carolina)

hiker chick
04-18-2008, 05:41 PM
Here's a useful resource: Reynold Aluminum's foil grilling recipes.

http://www.reynoldspkg.com/reynoldskitchens/en/recipes/recipe_search.asp?Category=17&Step=Category&CategoryText=On+The+Grill

My gear is packed. Menu-planning time.

:)

Grilling with foil info:

http://www.reynoldspkg.com/reynoldskitchens/en/info_page/grilling.asp

For all the latest and greatest gear that's available these days, it's hard to beat some of the basics. Like foil.

And here's the link to the great new camp cooking forum:

http://camp-cook.com/forum/index.php

DOGBOX
04-19-2008, 01:49 AM
Wow. I was just at GI Joe's looking at Weber Baby Q's for my new trailer. Now I have to go back and buy one so I can try these recipes!

BXGR8R
04-19-2008, 01:58 AM
Thought I would pass this on.

Got turned on to this website from whiteblaze.net They put up one special a day. It is hit or miss but I have seen some stuff that if I didn't already have I would get from them.

Anyways it is outdoordaily.com



as for cooking, I have also found this website to be good for ideas for backpacking cooking. freezerbagcooking.com It has lots of ideas for dehydrating your own stuff and keeping it lightweight.

hiker chick
04-20-2008, 09:31 PM
I shouldn't read this thread on an empty stomach... I think the drool is killing my keyboard and I caught myself nibbling on the monitor:grin:

That really does look heavenly, especially for a pastry fan.

You've convinced me yet again HC (without trying), next purchase Dutch Oven (and maybe a skillet... I love making Low McMuffins for breakfast).

:razz: Photos of my cooking -- were I to take them more often -- would rarely elicit such enthusiasm. Except from Gidget, who is my #1 fan (this evening she had grilled organic chicken breasts)

Here's a link to the Lodge collection on amazon.com "Logic" is the pre-seasoned. Thank you. I'm going in search of more mixes tomorrow. :)

http://www.amazon.com/b/ref=amb_link_4261592_58?ie=UTF8&node=297572&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=gp-left-1&pf_rd_r=1AYM60DP35KHNP2CB7QG&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=336416101&pf_rd_i=289814

Look how cheap the 10" is and includes free super saver shipping. I'm thinking of surprising my sister with this. Just got off the phone with her and turns out she has no cast iron. We grew up with it in the kitchen but cast iron did not stick with us. Pardon the pun.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31E9C9NCCPL._SL110_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-Logic-4-Inch-Pre-Seasoned-Skillet/dp/B00006JSUA/ref=pd_ts_c_th_1?pf_rd_p=299471101&pf_rd_s=right-4&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_i=297572&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1BG2DDH0683JBQ3XXC43)

Lodge Logic 10-1/4-Inch Pre-Seasoned Skillet (http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-Logic-4-Inch-Pre-Seasoned-Skillet/dp/B00006JSUA/ref=pd_ts_c_th_1?pf_rd_p=299471101&pf_rd_s=right-4&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_i=297572&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1BG2DDH0683JBQ3XXC43)

$10.83

protaganis
04-24-2008, 12:23 PM
Okay, I can't see DO stuffs anymore... I'm trying to get back in shape (other than that of a pear).

I did find that this place has some great pants, shirts and a modular backpack that freaking rocks. http://www.511tactical.com
Don't let the name throw you, they carry some of the best pants I've ever seen (If you're into cargo pants).
Now if only I can convince my wife that I need a new backpack:D

These are what I have.

TheTimeTravelers
04-26-2008, 04:50 AM
I just bought a Reynolds Handi-Vac Vacuum Sealer (http://www.reynoldspkg.com/reynoldskitchens/handi_vac/en/product.asp?cat_id=1337&prod_id=3918) for $10 at the grocery store. It's a little hand-held battery operated vacuum sealer. It portable and cheaper than the big vacuum sealing machines. Works great.

DOGBOX
04-26-2008, 11:26 PM
So what do you use this for that regular ziploc bags don't do?

Old Blue
04-27-2008, 03:34 AM
So what do you use this for that regular ziploc bags don't do?

Storing instant water - gotta be air tight

tkobrian
04-28-2008, 12:43 PM
I just bought a Reynolds Handi-Vac Vacuum Sealer (http://www.reynoldspkg.com/reynoldskitchens/handi_vac/en/product.asp?cat_id=1337&prod_id=3918) for $10 at the grocery store. It's a little hand-held battery operated vacuum sealer. It portable and cheaper than the big vacuum sealing machines. Works great.


Hmmm...I'd be real interested in how this works on a multi-day trip. It's a PITA when the ice starts to melt & you get water in the zippie bags of lunch meat/cheese/condiments etc. :mad: I've used the big home one for all my raw meats for camping trips for years and they're GREAT. Problem is you're not supposed to re-use the bags for raw meat, and the bags are pricey.

For home use we use the canisters & hard containers for lots of stuff, since the bags aren't economical & tend to crush some things. It'll more than double the fridge life for cut fruit/veggies and lunch meats/cheese. They've definitely paid for themselves many times over.

Helpful hint. Anything with any liquid contents whatsoever (I mean ANY) should be frozen first then bagged so you don't suck the liquid into the machine...spaghetti sauce is a mother to get outta that thing. :oops:

I'll freeze soups/pasta sauce, etc then put 'em in the bags. It reduces the ice you need, plus there's less chance of the lid getting knocked off and contents dumped in your ice chest as things start to thaw.

Jojo
04-28-2008, 01:08 PM
I got mine on Friday...I paid $7.00 for it and $2.78 for 12 gallon sized bags.
Mr. Jojo is going around sealing everything in the fridge-vegies, lettuce, cheese, luch meats, etc.
The seals are lasting and it's just so quick and easy to take something out and re-seal. We keep it in a drawer by the fridge.
Definately will take camping!:)

scorsone
04-28-2008, 03:22 PM
Didn't Zip-Loc just run an ad about how there normal freezer bags worked better than the vacuum bags at preventing freezer burn? Not that I really believed their ad because my butcher always vacuum seals my meat orders if they are going to be stored in the freezer. He comes from a long line of butchers, his father was a butcher, his uncle was a butcher, his mother was a butcher and his sister was a butchers daughter.

I like the idea of a cheap vacuum sealer but if it works like those space bags then I would not trust it to keep things really tight. I don't know if it is the valve or the zipper lock that the space bags use but they tend to fail on me.

Don't get me wrong, I am all for anything that will reduce bulk!

DOGBOX
04-29-2008, 10:28 AM
I was driving down I-5 South in Washington a couple of weeks ago and, lo and behold, there is this hugemongous Cabella's out there. I'd never seen it before. It is a little bit above Olympia (just north of Lacey/St Martin's) and just west of the freeway. I assume it is new, or have I just not noticed?

Anybody shopped there yet? I'm likely going up to that area this weekend and might just "have to" drop in to pick up some things for my new trailer--I like their black spare tire covers (most are white--not becoming of the E). Have also read that their sportsmen blankets make for warmer popup bunk ends if set over the ends. I'm wondering if they would also make for warmer tents if one could somehow stretch them over the tent like a tarp. Supposedly in the popup they don't create condensation problems.

Junebug
04-29-2008, 11:31 AM
I assume it is new, or have I just not noticed?

Anybody shopped there yet?

It opened last year at some point, so yes, pretty new! And no, I haven't shopped there yet, but I hear it's nice.

paulj
04-29-2008, 11:47 AM
The Cabelas opened up last Novemeber. They've been expanding quite a bit ovrer the past decade. I stopped the origianl Nebraska store on one trip back to Chicago, but that was a long time ago.

What's their 'sportsman blanket' like? Is that the reflective 'emergency blanket'? I've used those for years, mainly to add a bit of extra reflective warmth on chilly nights. Most often I drape it in a tent like fashion over my dog when night temperatures drop below 50.

Close to your body a reflective blanket does add warmth, though at the cost of some condensation. Further away, such as over the tent, it may help early in the evening when the tent is loosing heat by radiation. But in the cold early morning I don't think it makes much difference, since the air is as cold as anything else.

paulj

protaganis
04-29-2008, 12:18 PM
I don't recall where I saw them before (It's been a few years). There was a wool blanket with a mylar survival blanket sewn between two layers. Supposed to work really well. I haven't seen any recently, I still regret not having gotten that one when I saw it.

paulj
04-29-2008, 12:34 PM
The wool should absorb any condensation.

TheTimeTravelers
04-29-2008, 07:27 PM
I don't recall where I saw them before (It's been a few years). There was a wool blanket with a mylar survival blanket sewn between two layers. Supposed to work really well. I haven't seen any recently, I still regret not having gotten that one when I saw it.
I bought one of these Slumber Pet Thermal Cat Mats (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000ERNO0M) for our cat and she refused to use it, so I tried it. I place it under the blanket and it does a great job of warming up cold feet at night. It's made of soft fleece and is washable. It has thermal mylar between the fleece layers. I'm going to take it camping and try it out.

I wonder if Gidget has one of these?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000ERNO0M

hiker chick
04-29-2008, 08:09 PM
You didn't really find this before Hiker Chick did you??? There ought to be a prize for that.

Indeed, I'm vacuum bagless. :|

For now...

:-P

By the way:


REI sale starts May 2!!!!

hiker chick
04-29-2008, 08:12 PM
I wonder if Gidget has one of these?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000ERNO0M

Gidget has a non-thermal mat, but what she really wants is a cat!

:)

scorsone
04-29-2008, 09:12 PM
I think I am going to have to get one of those Coleman pet sleeping bags for my dog Sam. He has always slept under a blanket and his blanket is getting a little ragged after 6 years of use. Sam discovered one of my daughters sleeping bags the other day and I think he has found heaven.

BXGR8R
04-29-2008, 09:40 PM
I plan on being there Friday when they open the doors. They are giving away water bottles with gift certificates worth from $5 to $100. Wish me luck.
And it will be my last chance to make some last minute purchases for my Appalachian Trail journey which starts on Tuesday.

hiker chick
04-29-2008, 09:51 PM
I think I am going to have to get one of those Coleman pet sleeping bags for my dog Sam. He has always slept under a blanket and his blanket is getting a little ragged after 6 years of use. Sam discovered one of my daughters sleeping bags the other day and I think he has found heaven.

I need to start saving Gidget's shedding to spin into yarn to make coats for fur-deprived pups.

Were Gidget in need of further insulation I'd definately go for one of those Coleman dog bags.

B1ke Box
04-29-2008, 09:55 PM
When they opened the store in Greensboro, they gave away 24 oz Novara big mouth bottles, with the card saying they were BPA free.

BXGR8R
04-29-2008, 09:57 PM
Shop Early, Get a Gift!
The first 200 people (age 12 and older) through the doors each day will receive a special-edition 32-ounce Nalgene water bottle and an REI gift card valued at $5 to $100. (Doors open at 10 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. on Sunday.)


They are Nalgene, but they don't say if they are the bad ones or not.

paulj
04-29-2008, 11:16 PM
They are Nalgene, but they don't say if they are the bad ones or not.

According to the Canadian government, you should be ok as long as you don't use boiling water to mix baby formula in them. Oh, and don't use a bleach or other harsh chemical to sterilize them.

paulj

DOGBOX
04-29-2008, 11:51 PM
What's their 'sportsman blanket' like? Is that the reflective 'emergency blanket'? I've used those for years, mainly to add a bit of extra reflective warmth on chilly nights. Most often I drape it in a tent like fashion over my dog when night temperatures drop below 50.

Close to your body a reflective blanket does add warmth, though at the cost of some condensation. Further away, such as over the tent, it may help early in the evening when the tent is loosing heat by radiation. But in the cold early morning I don't think it makes much difference, since the air is as cold as anything else.

paulj

No, it is not one of those ultralight emergency blankets. Here is the link. Supposedly when you put it over the pop-out bunk of a folding trailer it really helps with heat or cold. I think they just lay them over the canvas. They also put reflectix under the mattress on the bunk slide out and over the windows of the bed area. I plan to give it a try--the sportsmen blanket anyway. Read the reviews--pretty positive.

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp;jsessionid=LUADNZ15JRTO5LAQBBLCCNNMCAEFAI WE?id=0006243510214a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&No=288&Ntt=blanket&noImage=0&Ntk=Products&QueryText=blanket&Ntx=matchall&N=4887&Nty=1

BXGR8R
04-30-2008, 12:45 AM
According to the Canadian government, you should be ok as long as you don't use boiling water to mix baby formula in them. Oh, and don't use a bleach or other harsh chemical to sterilize them.

paulj

Yeah, Im not too worried about it. I'm still carrying one.

paulj
04-30-2008, 02:41 AM
That red and silver one is what I use. Sells for about $10. It is, in effect, a modest size waterproof tarp with some reflective properties. I keep it stashed in the driver side rear window along with the reflectix window covers.

paulj

Rocket Dog
04-30-2008, 05:28 AM
This photo came from the Teardrop shopping thread. What's this propane unit here in the corner of the photo? I think its for cooking but I've never seen a unit like it.

52562

PopUpSteve
04-30-2008, 07:20 AM
That is a new lightweight see through propane bottle.

Box4Rox
04-30-2008, 10:44 AM
This photo came from the Teardrop shopping thread. What's this propane unit here in the corner of the photo? I think its for cooking but I've never seen a unit like it.

52562

It's a Camp Chef single burner low pressure (30,000 BTU) . . . Camp Chef offers accessories like a BBQ or Griddle or Dutch Oven diffuser that you can place on top . . . that one got used this past weekend to run the BBQ in the campsite and then was moved to the group site to boil water for enough spaghetti to feed 30+ :)

http://www.campchef.com/catalog/group/1/10/0/1+Burner+Stoves.html


The propane tank is 100% fiberglass . . . 10 lb (actually 11 lb). Really light compare to steel . . .

http://www.downwindmarine.com/xcart/Propane-tank-Fiberglass-10-lb-p-111324.html


The Dog is a Black American Field Labrador Retriever from Sonoran Desert Sport Dogs and can eat anything made with the stove and propane tank . . . :D

http://dogs.sdsdogs.com/

PopUpSteve
04-30-2008, 01:00 PM
Hey Box4Rox, do you know if those are the same height as the old steel ones? The reason I ask is that I have a cover for my old steel tank but I would like to get a new fiberglass tank.

Box4Rox
04-30-2008, 10:42 PM
Hey Box4Rox, do you know if those are the same height as the old steel ones? The reason I ask is that I have a cover for my old steel tank but I would like to get a new fiberglass tank.

Yes . . . they are the same height and diameter. (10 lb steel vs 10 lb fiberglass) :)

Box4Rox
04-30-2008, 11:14 PM
I addition to the Camp Chef stuff mentioned above (separate stove, grill box, griddle, cast iron dutch oven) I also have another propane set-up I like better . . . :cool:

The Camp Chef stuff is heavy (steel) and bulky; only reason it went out last weekend was the need to boil a big pot of spaghetti water for the group pot luck.

The Weber Q series is lighter . . . saves me almost 50 lbs (aluminum !!) . . . and packs smaller. :):):)

I really like this and usually take it instead of what RD posted in the pic:

http://www.weber.com/bbq/pub/grill/2007/q/Q220.aspx



* Weber Q220 grill (has high cover and can handle a small whole chicken)

http://www.weber.com/bbq/img/Q220_detail3.jpg

* Weber Q griddle (this is cool . . . fits right on top of the grill)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31Y4Z9BR16L._SL500_AA280_.jpg

* GSI Hard Annodized cast aluminum dutch oven (fits on top of the grill - no diffuser required)

http://www.gsioutdoors.com/images/products/normal/50412_h1_n.jpg

DOGBOX
04-30-2008, 11:41 PM
So how do you like this grill? I have been on the fence about getting one for my new popup. I used to have a Weber GoAnywhere gas grill. I hated it. I swear it must have been defective, because I read a bunch of reviews on the internet from folks who think they are great. I think one of the issues with me is that I camp in colder climates (i'm talking maybe 60 degrees when cooking). So maybe these little gas grills just are made for warm summer weather?

I like the idea of grilling, just don't want to haul a big huge thing. I was looking at the BabyQ 100 series. But if a 200 series can handle a whole chicken--well that's pretty handy. Does it pull a lot of propane in a weekend?

Box4Rox
05-01-2008, 12:03 AM
I also had a "go anywhere" and it was junk :mad:

The Q is much better . . . stainless burner and a different valve that gives very precise control . . . I'm extremely happy with it. TOTALLY different than the go-anywhere . . . another example of you get what you pay for.

100 or 120 (with side tables) may be all you need if you're just cooking for 1 or 2

200 has a shallow lid and won't hold a whole chicken . . . 220 gets you the high lid and thermometer.

Doesn't suck nearly as much propane as the camp chef . . . running both the Q and the 2 burner stove in the teardrop , I'll go through maybe a 1/4 of one of the 10 lb tanks in a weekend. Coldest I've used it was probably mid 50's and it was fine . . . 100 = 8500 BTU 200 = 12000 BTU

There are some 220's out there in red (a discontinued color) going for $165 which is a great deal !!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000H1Y350/ref=noref?ie=UTF8&s=garden

protaganis
05-01-2008, 12:29 AM
I've got an earlier Weber Q grill, Love it. Buy the adapter hose when you get it. The smaller "pipework" propane tanks are okay, but you can get literal hours out of the 20 pounder. The fold up stand is a good investment too.

Only complaint is that they made the pressure valve too sensitive. If you have any issues getting yours to run at it's highest setting, Close the tank valve and let the hose empty out (leaving the unit open and grill valve open), once it's stopped, just BARELY crack the valve on the tank (I mean it, just until you can hear gas squeaking into the line) Now fire up the grill and viola, it'll run all out. You can ease the tank open more, but you won't need it. Gas consumption is low on this model.

Hope this helps.

DOGBOX
05-01-2008, 12:39 AM
I've got an earlier Weber Q grill, Love it.

Is yours a Baby Q? Like the smallest one?

protaganis
05-01-2008, 04:02 PM
Nah, mine's the first gen. I think they renamed it to the "Q 200". Not tiny by any stretch of the imagination, but well designed and easy to use.

I like the baby Q, but I can do a full sized bird in mine or a couple of Pot Roasts together. Considering how many people we get together for the drive-in, that volume counts.:D

csm
05-01-2008, 06:41 PM
I have the baby q. it is great.

Rocket Dog
05-01-2008, 08:21 PM
Two tents:

1) Big Agnes Big House 4 $199.00

2) REI Camp Dome 5 $164.93

Anyone have experience with either tent? Thanks very much.

Mrs.Anthony337
05-02-2008, 03:42 AM
Just want to throw it out there- Costco has had some camping items here and there over the past few weeks- we picked up a stove, a lodge logic dutch oven and all sorts of other things- like 7 day ice chests, tarps, and clear plastic storage containers...etc... all pretty good prices.

boley
05-02-2008, 09:22 AM
Two tents:

1) Big Agnes Big House 4 $199.00

2) REI Camp Dome 5 $164.93

Anyone have experience with either tent? Thanks very much.


No experience yet, but I just purchased the Big Agnes Big House 6 from the REI sale last night. The customer reviews on REI look positive so I jumped on it. I actually jumped on the enormous vestibule also. I can darn near park the E under that thing.

I will try and remember to report back after we use it on Memorial Day.

Approx 20 feet x 8 feet total coveage.
http://media.rei.com/media/g/1160866.jpg

Junebug
05-02-2008, 10:37 AM
Just want to throw it out there- Costco has had some camping items here and there over the past few weeks- we picked up a stove, a lodge logic dutch oven and all sorts of other things- like 7 day ice chests, tarps, and clear plastic storage containers...etc... all pretty good prices.

Is your Costco stocking the DO with the legs on the bottom? I got excited to see one at mine but it wasn't the one you can use coals with. I do plan to get my new cooler from them though!

TheTimeTravelers
05-02-2008, 08:46 PM
No experience yet, but I just purchased the Big Agnes Big House 6 from the REI sale last night. The customer reviews on REI look positive so I jumped on it. I actually jumped on the enormous vestibule also. I can darn near park the E under that thing.

I will try and remember to report back after we use it on Memorial Day.

Approx 20 feet x 8 feet total coveage.
Wow, that's a big tent. Most of the campsites we've been to lately have pretty small tent pads and there wouldn't be room for this one.

We got a REI Hobitat 6 Tent on sale last year. It's really big inside with lots of head room. REI also makes the REI Hobitat 4 Tent $299, which looks like a nice tent.

boley
05-02-2008, 10:08 PM
The Big Agnes 6 tent is just 10 feet x 8 feet. The vestibule is approximately the same size, so combined it is about 20x8. Regardless, finding space to set it up will be a challenge at times. At least the vestibule does not really need totally flat land to work.

We really only need the 4 man, but with the REI sale this week the price difference between the 4 man and 6 man was only about $40. Since it is for car camping I figured bigger is better. Some weekend I will undoubtedly be sitting under that cavernous pile of nylon in a driving rain storm and appreciate the size.

Mrs.Anthony337
05-02-2008, 10:28 PM
Is your Costco stocking the DO with the legs on the bottom? I got excited to see one at mine but it wasn't the one you can use coals with. I do plan to get my new cooler from them though!

Yea, without legs :( but I think we'll still get use of it...good price.

Junebug
05-03-2008, 01:52 AM
Yea, without legs :( but I think we'll still get use of it...good price.

I hear you on the price. It was tempting ... I'm almost glad yours wasn't stocking the one with legs, cuz then I'd be driving to all the local Costco's to try and find it. Hm, now that I mention that, it doesn't sound so bad after all. :shock:

paulj
05-03-2008, 02:07 AM
For use with coals, the shape of the lid is more important than whether it has legs or not. Without legs you can set it on a stand or rocks. But the lid needs to have rim to hold coals. If the lid is domed, then the DO (cast iron or enameled) is meant for oven and stove top use.

The outdoor DO normally has a wire bail handle.

I have large cast iron pan that, I believe was sold as a 'chicken frier' - about 10" diameter, but with a solid handle, and a heavy glass lid. It works fine for home baking and braises. Of late I've been using it most for the long rise no-knead bread.

paulj

Rocket Dog
05-03-2008, 07:27 AM
I must have this recipe for long rise no knead bread. ** produces checkbook **

hiker chick
05-03-2008, 09:56 AM
A remarkable thing happened at the REI sale.

I spent only $10. :)

On Cliff Bars and a propane canister.

If Marmot would come out with more colors in their precip jacket I'd have been tempted. But they haven't so I didn't.

Was tempted by the $40 savings on the Lowa midweight boots that I have owned several pair of.

But there are miles still to go on the two pair I already have so took a pass.

In sum, I left sale gear for everyone else.

Happy shopping!

:)

DOGBOX
05-03-2008, 10:41 AM
Somebody mentioned camping gear from Costco. I recently bought the Coleman packaway kitchen, but actually set it up just last night (plan to use it today for a potluck with hunting friends). It is pretty nice and quite packable/lightweight. When I saw it at Costco, I was a little undecided about it because it looked like it might be too much trouble to set up--I like things fast and simple. Turned out just like that. I'm pleased.

I also wasn't sure about the open "table", i.e., the side where their picture shows the 2-burnder Coleman sitting. I figured--well, I really seldom use my 2-burner stove, and am happy with a 1-burner Coleman (Coleman's Power-pack Perfect Flow Propane Stove--excellent, simple to use, CHEAP, stove). When I set it up, it turns out that the railings that hold the stove are completely adjustable in how far apart you set them. So I was able to narrow them for the one burner stove.

Also at Costco, they sell the cutting boards with the collapsible strainer. The cutting board fits across the open area as well. So I put the one burner stove on one side, and the cutting board on the other portion of that open area. They perfectly used up the space--and feel solid enough to chop and cook with no regard for tipping or being pushed off. The setup then left the entire table top free for a grill, serving area, or other uses. I also picked up some collapsible bowls at Costco to match the cutting board.

And like the previous poster mentioned, the storage bins are a pretty good buy. I picked up a couple of sizes.

All, in all, made good on the gear I picked up at Costco.

HC--your visit to REI is certainly noteworty. I, too, own everything they sell already. But I still have to go visit to get a refund for the 20& off Yakima racks. I recently bought a Raptor bike mount for my trailer and was told that if the price drops within 30 days, I just walk in and they will give me the difference. $99 bike mount, bought with a $65 dividend check, and now I'm gonna walk in and ask for $20 bucks back! Sweet.

Hope to make it to Cabela's today, and that should be the final touches on my trailer setup.

paulj
05-03-2008, 01:14 PM
The no-knead recipe that I use is derived from one popularized by a NYTimes column several years ago:
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html
It is some times called the Lahey, Sullivan, or Bittman (the NY columnist) bread.
I use the proportions here:
http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2006/12/noknead_balloon_bread_loaf_10.html

The gist is to make up a dough with just a small amount of yeast (1/4 tsp), then let it sit for 12 or more hours. The long slow rise replaces kneading. It is then baked in a covered pan. This replicates the hot moist conditions of a baker's oven, developing a good crust.

A 5qt (or larger) dutch oven is a good baking vessel for this bread.

Junebug
05-03-2008, 01:52 PM
I also make a "no-knead" bread, using the Cook's Illustrated recipe. There's a thread around here somewhere about bread-baking. Search for threads started by me that include bread. :)

I use an enameled DO for that recipe, and plan to get a regular one (with legs and the flat lid) for camping.

The weather seems to be inching closer to good camping weather around here ... can't wait to try out some of my gear! Seems like I've just been collecting it since last fall and haven't given it a whirl yet.

Box4Rox
05-03-2008, 02:41 PM
A remarkable thing happened at the REI sale.

I spent only $10. :)


I had the same thing happen a few sales ago . . . sort of leaves you feeling empty and useless and un-campworthy :sad: Didn't even use my 20 % off on anything . . .

This sale is different however . . . :shock:

Last Sunday (before the sale) on my way home from camping near Sheboygan, I visited the REI in Madison and went bonkers buying up all the MTS T's, MTS mesh T's, MTS underwear, MTS long sleeves, etc. . Monday, the sale flyer showed up and about $200.00 of the MTS stuff was GOING ON SALE !!!! Noooooooo . . . :oops:

A phone call to REI revealed they have 30 day policy that grandfathers my purchases in under the sale prices . . . did the whole sale refund thing on the phone . . . thank you REI :) :) :)

Went back yesterday and got even more MTS, lots of socks, one of the mesh camp chairs and some cateye bike stuff . . . still haven't figured out what to spend the 20% on. :-?

hiker chick
05-03-2008, 04:27 PM
That's quite a haul, Box.

Now that I'm back on the computer I'll pull up rei.com and give more thought to the 20% coupon...

:)

jdiane
05-03-2008, 05:10 PM
Ya'll had to tell me about the REI sale, didnt you! :cry: There goes Sunday, and my next paycheck! :oops::rolleyes: We need a new campstove... :rolleyes: And probably 10 other things too...

Box4Rox
05-03-2008, 06:06 PM
That's quite a haul, Box.

Now that I'm back on the computer I'll pull up rei.com and give more thought to the 20% coupon...

:)


Have you considered standardizing your lighting to only CR123 batteries (most of your lights are Surefire, correct ? )

I'm doing that and it is handy only stocking 1 battery type for everything I use :cool:

Here's a decent (made in USA) headlamp that uses C123's

http://www.rei.com/product/748982

http://media.rei.com/media/w/1265841.jpg

Box4Rox
05-03-2008, 06:11 PM
Ya'll had to tell me about the REI sale, didnt you! :cry: There goes Sunday, and my next paycheck! :oops::rolleyes: We need a new campstove... :rolleyes: And probably 10 other things too...

Yakima SkyBoxes . . . on SALE . . . 20% off . . . you can use it to carry all the other stuff you will buy . . . . Hurry, hurry, hurry ! :D


http://media.rei.com/media/724405.jpg

(Skyboxes are a requirement to gain entrance privileges to Miss Ellies Flagg Ranch/Jellystoned/Teton extravaganza )

TheTimeTravelers
05-04-2008, 04:32 AM
This morning I told myself "don't go to REI, don't go to REI, don't go to REI, there's nothing you need at REI." We've recently bought two new tents, new trekking poles, new Yakima box, new bike gear...there's nothing else we need from REI. Of course at 4pm we found ourselves driving in that direction. We got a bunch of the 25-30% off sale items, On Guard bike lock, Serfas bike seat, Counter Assault bear spray, MSR PackTowls and a Gerber Folding Shovel. So we managed to find a few things we didn't already have. We still have until May 11th to use the 20% off coupon.

hiker chick
05-04-2008, 08:21 AM
This morning I told myself "don't go to REI, don't go to REI, don't go to REI, there's nothing you need at REI." We've recently bought two new tents, new trekking poles, new Yakima box, new bike gear...there's nothing else we need from REI. Of course at 4pm we found ourselves driving in that direction. We got a bunch of the 25-30% off sale items, On Guard bike lock, Serfas bike seat, Counter Assault bear spray, MSR PackTowls and a Gerber Folding Shovel. So we managed to find a few things we didn't already have. We still have until May 11th to use the 20% off coupon.

That is a good deal on bear spray.

I keep it on my nightstand for self-defense against human intruders. And I carry it on the trail on my hip-belt.

Bear spray -- it deters more than bears.

:)

I'd like to get another closed-cell pad but am not seeing those on sale.

DOGBOX
05-04-2008, 10:18 AM
Yesterday I went to the Cabel'as store in Lacey Washington. I had mixed feelings. Store is impressive--esp the cold water aquarium right smack center. Broad range of products, but lots of their products are thin inventory.

I was pretty disappointed in the camping section and trailer supplies--which is what I went there for. They really offer very little more than the same products you can find at Sporstmen Warehouse or GI Joes, even Target and WalMart carry a lot of these products--rubbermaid coolers, a few camping lanterns--generally the same Coleman's you find everywhere else, some rebadged with their store name. They did have some nice oil lanterns, if you are into the old-fashioned looking ones. For me and my trailer, Camping World and Sportsmen Warehouse are preferable. I had a list of about 5 things I planned to buy there, and found one of those things at the store. It was frustrating to FINALLY find the section where you would expect to find something (store is pretty big), and then find empty shelf space because it wasn't there, or it simply wasn't carried. The products are offered on their website, so I had hoped to purchase them and avoid the shipping.

And speaking of finding things, their ATV/trailer area had aisle signs listing products--none of which seemed to really match what was on that aisle. Since that was the first deparment I visited, it left me feeling confused right off the bat as to where things might be in this store. This was followed by a visit to their "bargain cave" which was a mess (with prices that were hardly begging me to buy). And a visit to their camping section which was full of out-of control kids. It's a very nice store, but on this particular day I did not have a comfortable shopping experience.

There IS PLENTY to buy at this store, just not much all that special. One exception may be some of their specialty fishing and hunting stuff. I looked at the products used for training bird dogs. They carry considerably more dog equipment than either Joes or Sportsmen Warehouse. Though I didn't look, I suspect some of their firearms and fishing gear is a little deeper too. And in all fairness, SOME of their camping cook stuff was pretty extensive--smokers, grills, etc. Like I said, not much you will find other stores.

In the camping comfort area--I enjoyed seeing some of their camp shower stuff set up--to inspect quality of materials, ease of set up and overall size. In the end all seemed like a bit much work and to much to lug around for one or two people on a weekend. They also had one or two inexpensive plastic bucket portapotties that I hadn't seen at other stores. Use chemicals like the flushable portapotties to breakd down matter and control odor. I kinda wish more folks who primitive camp would think about this type of product, as, here in Oregon, I have come upon primitive campgrounds with piles of filth enough to make an environmental hazard. " Leave no trace" apparently gets tossed to the wind by too many nature lovers.

Being Saturday afternoon, the store was also quite crowded. As mentioned earlier, the store seemed to have more than its share of out-of-control children. I mean REALLY out-of-control children. Did I mention the out-of-control kids? I found the shopping experience annoying at best. Not much sales personnel assistance either.

Like I said, I have mixed feelings. They carry decent stuff, but didn't find too much that would make me travel out of my way to shop their again. Maybe the aisle signage and kids was a one day fluke. Who knows.

paulj
05-04-2008, 12:41 PM
My latest REI 'splurge' was a $2 Niteize Figure9 rope tightener. It was extolled earlier on this thread (or a related one).

I'm somewhat disappointed. I'm having trouble finding line that grips well. I think the best line has to have just the right diameter and give.

Also it is only reliable only as long as the line is tight. If there is much slack the line could come off the secondary hook, and weaken its grip.

It should work fine on selected uses, such as tarp lines. I wouldn't replace the existing 3 hole tighteners on my tarps, but it could be a supplement. For example if I need a particularly short loop, or need to pass the loop through a closed ring or hole.

But for overall reliability and versitility, I stick with my inventory of knots. In situations where the Figure9 is useful, a trucker's hitch, or one of the sliding knots (rolling hitch etc) would do just as well.

paulj

protaganis
05-04-2008, 01:36 PM
I keep an eye on steep and cheap & whisky militia (very weird name). They've had some great deals on camping gear, including headlamps, big agnes sleeping bags, clothes, jackets and tents (saw a kelty pavilion 4 person for $250)

I just got a second headlamp.
$25 plus 5 in shipping. Worth peeking in every once in a while.

As for the figure 9, I tend to use paracord. high tensile strength, lightweight and it fits perfect. Once you get used to it, the figure 9 becomes scond nature... Alot like knots I'd wager:D

paulj
05-04-2008, 05:17 PM
Tying a simple overhand knot around the standing part should improve the security of a Figure 9. If the rope slips in the tightener, this knot will slide closer to the 9, and improve tighten its grip.

paulj

DOGBOX
05-04-2008, 06:04 PM
I swear this thread contributes to the national debt. Had to go use the 20% coupon. Was gonna buy a heart monitor/watch. Got to REI and the Timex monitors were already 25% off. Since the 20% coupon only works with full priced items, I ended up buying the Timex monitor AND a doggy pack. Of course, the doggy pack begged for a dog hike book, which also led to another book titled "The Dog Lover's Guide to the Pacific NW". Weather's great--my dogs are headed out to enjoy the new gear!


PS. The next time REI has a 20% coupon NOBODY say ANYTHING. OK? I mean, I hadn't even noticed the coupon until I read this thread last night!

jdiane
05-04-2008, 07:35 PM
I swear this thread contributes to the national debt. Had to go use the 20% coupon.

PS. The next time REI has a 20% coupon NOBODY say ANYTHING. OK? I mean, I hadn't even noticed the coupon until I read this thread last night!

Actually, lack of consumer spending is why we are in this recession- its the only thing driving the US economy :rolleyes:

At our REI trip today we got a new Coleman double burner stove- basically the updated version of the 12 year old model we had been using, personal water filtration system, REI convertable pants, and a book on snowshoe trails in NorCal.

Yes, please no one mention any more sales! especially roof racks or cargo boxes! My partner is already an obsessive overpacker! The E is full! I will not pack outside the box! :D:D

hiker chick
05-04-2008, 08:21 PM
Yesterday I went to the Cabel'as store in Lacey Washington. I had mixed feelings. Store is impressive--e but lots of their products are thin inventory.


How irritating that would have been. I've never been to a Cabela's and had actually considered a day trip with a friend up to the closest store -- in Pennsylvania. Don't think I'll risk such a disappointment.

Still, I look forward to visiting one someday. A friend from Omaha has said I need to visit the flagship store in Sidney, Nebraska. Might be doable in route to Yellowstone sometime. :)

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/community/aboutus/retail-detail.jsp?detailedInformationURL=/cabelas/en/content/community/aboutus/retail/retail_stores/sidney/sidney.html

hiker chick
05-04-2008, 08:32 PM
I swear this thread contributes to the national debt. Had to go use the 20% coupon.

The next time REI has a 20% coupon NOBODY say ANYTHING. OK? I mean, I hadn't even noticed the coupon until I read this thread last night!

:-P

LOL! We are consumer-patriots.

On the other hand, I'm spending just $20 a night to camp. Would be spending a heck of a lot more going to resorts or beach houses.

Went out to the teardrop today to get it prepped for it's first camping trip. Clothes, sleeping bags, pillows, hiking gear, books, etcetera, etcetera, are all packed in the back of the teardrop. All we'll need to bring from DC is a cooler and Gidget's stuff.

tick-tock... tick-tock.

:)

Junebug
05-04-2008, 08:45 PM
Might be doable in route to Yellowstone sometime. :)

Yeah, like August. (http://www.elementownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=38483) :D

I could use an in-person training session for guy lines, tent staking, and knots/rope securing. It's only luck (and fair-weather camping) that my tent hasn't lifted off and flown away. Seriously ... I'm smart about some things, but adequately securing a tent or shelter is beyond me. :oops:

hiker chick
05-04-2008, 09:26 PM
Yeah, like August. (http://www.elementownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=38483) :D

I could use an in-person training session for guy lines, tent staking, and knots/rope securing. It's only luck (and fair-weather camping) that my tent hasn't lifted off and flown away. Seriously ... I'm smart about some things, but adequately securing a tent or shelter is beyond me. :oops:

Sadly, this August is unlikely. :-( Meanwhile, you need these tighteners and two lines per corner of your tent or screenroom. That's in addition to staking the corner of your tent, of course. I typically tie the line to the tent and then stake it and then adjust the tightener.

None of mine have blown away and they have ridden out some wicked thunderstorms including hours upon hours of sustained high winds.

protaganis
05-04-2008, 09:42 PM
Ooh Ooh, found the perfect camping accessory!!!
The Pocket Ref. It's a book that covers a LOT. Helps to teach knots, it has morse code, vehicle maint. info, mathematical calculations, trig functions...etc.

Okay, not just camping stuff, but it does have a seriously cool load of things in it. Never know when an item like that may come in handy.:D

paulj
05-04-2008, 11:38 PM
Since I usually camp on gravel or packed dirt pad, the most useful tent pegs are ones that look like 12" long nails. And to pound them in I use a plastic mallet. You can find these at stores like Wally-world. The line tighteners that come already installed on Kelty guylines work well. You probably won't need the extra ones shown on this thread.

paulj

Junebug
05-05-2008, 12:12 AM
Thanks, paulj. I think that packed dirt might be part of my problem. I'll check out the nail-type pegs/stakes and different mallet. Will definitely be doing a dry run (or two) with all the gear before the big trip! I don't remember tighteners on the carport, but who knows ... I could have easily missed them.

paulj
05-05-2008, 02:29 AM
Kelty uses black, 3 hole sliders, about an 1 1/2" long. Pull a loop of line from between the outer two holes.

The carport, used in leanto fashion, does not need guylines unless the wind picks up. For a start it is enough to nail down the outer two corners. But there are lines that reinforce those. In addition you can stake down the corners of the side flaps. But if you have outboard poles, then you need at least one guy line in each corner. I don't know how many Kelty provides in that setup (I have the pre-deluxe version).

paulj

scorsone
05-05-2008, 10:42 AM
Yes the nail type stakes are handy and cheap to have for many camping locations. I have a set that I keep with each of my tents. We used them in MN a couple of years ago on a rainfly that was stretched out to give us a little more breathing space. It was really windy while we were out fishing and came back to see the fly had blown loose. After a little searching for one of the stakes we found it impaled into the fly and pole of our gear tent just about chest high. From that point on we have stuck to the "no modifications to the anchor locations of our tents" rule. That could have ended the trip early if someone was stepping out of the gear tent when the stake went flying through the air.

I usually just use the mallet end of my camp axe to drive them in. As for the tensioners I usually just tie the line to the stake and skip the tensioner.

Box4Rox
05-05-2008, 11:47 AM
Harumph. I will pout and struggle on my own then. :rolleyes:

Two per corner?? Yeesh. I can't even get the stakes in the ground the right way yet. Seriously, I'm deficient with this stuff somehow. Before the August trip, I'll be picking up some of the recommended stakes and some of the magic yellow thingies and apparently some guy lines or whatever the ropey things are. :| (At the Humboldt campout, I just stayed in my Element and even ditched the Kelty Carport.)

I have used the "rockbuster" stake on hard ground and they work well in both hardpack and softer stuff . . . (cabela's and lots of places on-line)

Wouldn't take them backpacking but if you have the space, they are great for car camping . . .

http://www.cabelas.com/spodw-1/0003789.shtml

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/content/Pod/00/37/89/p003789sq05.jpg

I usually ditch the guy lines that come with the tents and canopies in favor of 3mm or 4mm climbing cord (won't stretch as much if it gets wet)

http://www.rei.com/product/729594

http://www.rei.com/product/729595

http://media.rei.com/media/583267.jpg


REI sells it prepackaged . . .

I'll be happy to teach you a useful hitch (the tautline hitch) at Yellowstone that will eliminate the need for tensioners :-)

Junebug
05-05-2008, 11:51 AM
I'll be happy to teach you a useful hitch (the tautline hitch) at Yellowstone that will eliminate the need for tensioners :-)

THANK YOU! Hands-on special ed knot-tying class, sign me up!

Thanks to everyone else for their input too ... and for the record, I haven't shopped the REI sale yet either. Might put the 20% off coupon toward a new cooler though. :)

dcoyle4040
05-08-2008, 08:40 AM
Ok since I havent seen anything on this in all the posts. Does anyone have any recommendation for the bugs.
As I have said previously we are going on a family camping trip for over a week and would really like to avoid oiling up the kids with bug wipes every day. They are 3 and 1, and Im sure they would end up with some of it in there mouths. I wouldnt mind spending $100 on something that WILL work to keep our sites at a reasonable bug level as we will be camping everywhere from the hills of PA to the beach and everywhere in between.

scorsone
05-08-2008, 10:13 AM
I don't remember the name of the product but I do believe there are some child safe products that don't contain DEET. I am sure someone will chime in here shortly. Try looking at a local whole foods store or Wild Oats/Trader Joe's kind of places, they will be able to really help you out on choosing the best stuff. Some of the things that really help me to reduce the spray use is to wear lightweight pants and long sleeves if I am really in bug country. Up north in the MN Boundary Waters the black flies will get you even with 100% DEET coating your body but won't bother you if you have your skin covered.

Bike Zen
05-08-2008, 11:04 AM
I don't remember the name of the product but I do believe there are some child safe products that don't contain DEET. I am sure someone will chime in here shortly. Try looking at a local whole foods store or Wild Oats/Trader Joe's kind of places, they will be able to really help you out on choosing the best stuff. Some of the things that really help me to reduce the spray use is to wear lightweight pants and long sleeves if I am really in bug country. Up north in the MN Boundary Waters the black flies will get you even with 100% DEET coating your body but won't bother you if you have your skin covered.

This is me....chiming in :)

http://www.repel.com/ProductCategories/Insectrepellents/LemonEucalyptus/

dcoyle4040
05-08-2008, 11:11 AM
Thanks.. Has anybody ever used these. I saw them at Walmart the other day. Didnt want to trust them but the reviews look good. Thought maybe two or three of these around the campsite (with refills of course) and some DEETless sugestions.

http://www.amazon.com/Thermacell-ThermaCELL-Mosquito-Repellent-Device/dp/B000EYUH5A


Here is the review
http://hunting.about.com/od/hunting/gr/aapr_thermacell.htm

Farther
05-08-2008, 08:08 PM
LLBean and possibley REI have a line of bug repellant clothing. If memory serves me the dangers of DEET have been overdone and that the current recommendation for protection against the tick that carries Lym Disease is to use DEET. I apply DEET to my clothing and hair/beard and refrain from direct skin application. But you might want to GOOGLE it to verify.

hiker chick
05-08-2008, 08:46 PM
Dcoyle - have you looked at REI's web page? There are a number of products at this link which customers have reviewed.

http://www.rei.com/camping/TOC/Insect+Repellent?cm_re=toc*toc*insect_repellent&vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPING_TOC

I deploy a few strategies. First of all, I mostly camp above 3000 feet, which greatly lessens mosquito encounters. Wearing pants and long sleeves certainly help in the mornings and evenings, when mosquitoes are worst. Campsites surrounded by hedges and other bushy plants will tend to have more mosquitoes. I have a 12' x 12' screenroom which at least allows you to have a meal without bees and other bugs hovering. And I always have a citronella candle along:

http://www.rei.com/product/769364?vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPING_TOC

And in case I am bitten by a mosquito or some other insect, I always carry in my backpack and car an "after bite" product to stop the itch, such as this:

http://www.rei.com/product/750946

I've used a number of repellents over the years, and have no preference.

:-|

hiker chick
05-11-2008, 03:13 PM
Perhaps my great find of '08: two 48-gallon Rubbermaid Action-Packers fit nearly perfectly in the back of the Element. I've had these for several months but hadn't put them in the E until this weekend. These are perfect for me. They slide out to the tailgate which makes it easy to take things in and out. They are very sturdy (as expected, since I've had the smaller Action-Packers for years). With my Elemat tailgate protector on top of the boxes and a couple beach blankets on top of that it's the perfect place for Gidget to ride and to lounge.

Another bonus, the cargo organizers I've had in the E fit nicely in the Action-Packers.

The Action-Packers don't take up the whole rear, as you can see the small 8-gallon Action-Packer fits in the extra space with lots of room to spare. It's ample for additional smaller gear boxes.

Here's a link to the Action Packers at Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Rubbermaid-Actionpacker-Cargo-Box-gal/dp/B000CFV0DO/ref=pd_bbs_sr_4?ie=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1210532431&sr=8-4

hiker chick
05-11-2008, 03:46 PM
We haven't talked much about clothes on this thread but it really is essential gear. Mountain weather can change on a dime, dramatically, and the deserts can get quite cool at night. The campground we frequent is at 3700-foot elevation and I have several items permanently packed. As has been said ad nauseum, it's all about layers. In my case: light fleece tops (LL Bean's $19 fleece), Marmot "Dri-Clime" windshirt (actually a lightly fleece-lined, windproof jacket -- a fantastic piece for camping and hiking), waterproof shell (Marmot Pre-Cip is my fave), 100-weight fleece 1/4-zip for sleeping, long underwear (Bean had a great sale a while back), Smartwool socks, Lowe Gore-Tex (waterproof) hiking boots, 180s ear warmers, fleece neck gaiter, and several hats -- waterproof, fleece-line, non-fleece, Tilley, oil cloth. And gloves (work gloves for handling firewood, fingerless fleece gloves, ski gloves, thin gloves). And as stated before, the cheap fleece blankets from Campmor ($10 or so) or Bean ($19 or so) are priceless when you're lounging around on a cool, damp day. I'll put on my chair and sit on it as well as having one or more fleece blankets on my legs, depending on how cold it is. I've always got the gear to be comfortable, no matter how the weather may change. These pics are from Saturday morning. Around 2:00p the sun finally peaked out and we had a star-filled night last night. Very strong winds woke us up and I decided to pack up instead of waiting around for the rain to begin again.

hiker chick
05-12-2008, 07:43 AM
Looks like quite the trip. Feel the cold much in the trailer? I camped out in my Neon last weekend and it was a lot colder than I expected. Of course, I didn't turn on the heater because I hadn't figured out the propane thing yet.

I was at REI and saw the Capilene long underwear--like a light fleece. I don't know if it was considered midweight or heavy weight. They looked real comfy, and I'm tempted to pick up a set to keep in the trailer. Like some of the cooler nights you describe, I think they would compliment a nice sleeping bag and be plenty down to 35-40 degrees--without even firing up the heater.

Comfy long underwear is a necessity, for sleeping on a cold night and an added layer during the day in damp, cold weather. I wouldn't camp without -- at any time of year -- even in our little mountains.

When I first read "Neon" I was thinking: camping in a Dodge Neon? Wow, that's cozy. :-o

I didn't feel the cold at all once I was in the sleeping bag. Did throw another bag on top as a blanket -- helps a lot when you're using mild weather car camping bags as I do (LL Bean 40-degree bags). At the moment I have no plans for a heater. The teardrop has 3/4" plywood sidewalls and R11 insulation so we're fine if it doesn't go below the 30s.

Another great comfort item in cold weather is to sleep with warm soft socks on your feet. Something like these Life Is Good "Snuggle" socks.

http://www.amazon.com/Life-Good-Blue-Snuggle-Socks/dp/B000K26886/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=apparel&qid=1210592486&sr=8-5

Box4Rox
05-12-2008, 07:54 AM
They come it 3 colors . . . Black, Brown and Yellow . . . ;-)

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b91/Obi_the_dog/Kohler%20Andrae/insidetearasleep-1.jpg

hiker chick
05-13-2008, 05:02 PM
The two 48-gallon Rubbermaid Action-Packers again. With the black towels on you can't see through the tinted windows that the Action-Packers are in there. To keep them from sliding forward when braking, I've tethered them with Thule-straps to the rear tie-down. Now they don't budge.

If you don't need the rear seats in, this setup is very handy.

Alchemy
05-13-2008, 06:13 PM
The two 48-gallon Rubbermaid Action-Packers again. With the black towels on you can't see through the tinted windows that the Action-Packers are in there. To keep them from sliding forward when braking, I've tethered them with Thule-straps to the rear tie-down. Now they don't budge.

If you don't need the rear seats in, this setup is very handy.


Man I wish mine had pockets in the seats... That's a sweet seatup hiker chick. I think my rescue gear in one and kayak/climbing gear in the other would fit just perfect. What do you keep in yours?

paulj
05-13-2008, 07:17 PM
I used to have an after-market pocket set on my driver's side - Caselogic brand if I remember correctly. It worked pretty well. I eventually took it off to simplify the transition from driving to camping modes. It hooks to the headrest, and I have to remove the headrest when lowering the seatbacks for camping. Hooking and unhooking the pocket was an unnecessary step in that transition.

paulj

Alchemy
05-13-2008, 07:24 PM
I used to have an after-market pocket set on my driver's side - Caselogic brand if I remember correctly. It worked pretty well. I eventually took it off to simplify the transition from driving to camping modes. It hooks to the headrest, and I have to remove the headrest when lowering the seatbacks for camping. Hooking and unhooking the pocket was an unnecessary step in that transition.

paulj

Yeah... that sound doable, although my seats are always going up and down for camping/hauling/loading etc. so probably more a pain than it's worth... I wonder if it could hook to the headrest attachment so it wouldn't have to be removed when transforming? hmm.

hiker chick
05-13-2008, 07:51 PM
Alchemy -- check out these two items from Duluth Trading. They are well constructed.

http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/department/organizers_bags/organizers_bags2/vehicleorganizers/82049.aspx?feature=Product_1

I haven't yet used this Backseat Buddy but plan on keeping trail maps and books in it.

http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/department/organizers_bags/organizers_bags2/vehicleorganizers/82063.aspx?feature=Product_15

In the Action Packers I'm keeping the safety gear I normally have in the car but am holding most of the space in reserve for camping gear that can't stay in the trailer, such as Gidget's food and treats.

TheTimeTravelers
05-14-2008, 12:12 AM
The two 48-gallon Rubbermaid Action-Packers again. With the black towels on you can't see through the tinted windows that the Action-Packers are in there. To keep them from sliding forward when braking, I've tethered them with Thule-straps to the rear tie-down. Now they don't budge.

If you don't need the rear seats in, this setup is very handy.

Does Gidget ride in the passenger seat or in the back? I've wondered why you haven't built a platform for her in the back. She would have a good view out the back windows and would be able to direct your driving. We use three Flipak storage containers under our platform.

hiker chick
05-14-2008, 06:41 AM
Does Gidget ride in the passenger seat or in the back? I've wondered why you haven't built a platform for her in the back. She would have a good view out the back windows and would be able to direct your driving. We use three Flipak storage containers under our platform.

Gidget's always ridden in the back. The Elemat tailgate protector, which is quite large, lays over whatever containers are back there (henceforth the Action Packers) and over that I lay beach towels and sometimes a closed cell foam pad. She's harnessed and tethered to a tie-down.

Works very well. She can lay down and see out all the windows.

hiker chick
05-18-2008, 06:30 PM
Another shakedown camp weekend. Put the new hitch-mounted cargo carrier together and it would've worked great except the included hitch pin is too big for the teardrop's receiver. So a smaller one is on order. The cargo carrier is probably going to carry the screenroom, guy line, stakes... Have to smush it down enough to not block the tail lights and license plate. The tongue box should be here any day and then everything but the cooler should fit nicely in the teardrop. Did succeed in installing two really nice steel First Aid boxes. One holds bandages and the other various ointments -- antibiotic, burn, poison ivy, iodine, etc. So it's coming together.

hiker chick
05-18-2008, 06:50 PM
More pics of the First Aid boxes. These are very high quality and a good deal at Duluth Trading. I'd noticed on Amazon.com that a seller was asking nearly double.

http://www.duluthtrading.com/search/searchresults/69147.aspx?feature=Product_1&kw=first+aid

AimE
05-18-2008, 09:55 PM
Forgot my newest purchase. I had a gift card to Bass Pro Shops, so I ordered this lantern. I like that it is rechargeable. I remember reading here that it lasted for two evenings without needing a charge. Oh, but don't buy it from Bass. It was $42.99, but I spotted it on costco.com for around $34.99! Woah.

http://image.basspro.com/images/images2/92000/92383.jpg

http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10151&catalogId=10001&langId=-1&partNumber=73725&hvarTarget=search&cmCat=SearchResults

Mrs.Anthony337
05-19-2008, 07:30 AM
We've been shopping!

Instead of the traditional lanterns, we've decided to give these a try- got them at Home Depot, very affordable:
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00395.jpg

Been putting together first aid kits for us and the dogs- found we need bigger containers :P
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00390.jpg
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00393.jpg

Got this great no spill water dispenser/bowl for the dogs
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00392.jpg

Got a bunch of clear bins
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00404.jpg

Some new ice chests
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00406.jpg

A new grill, for when we cant campfire cook
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00411.jpg

Some duffel bags to fit everyones stuff in, including sleeping bags and camp pillows!
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00414.jpg



Much more on the way- hurry up snail mail!

Mrs.Anthony337
05-19-2008, 07:34 AM
We all got some new Keen shoes
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00415.jpg
those are mine, everyone got a different kind...love 'em and cant wait to get some more!

And you can't do a good caravan without FRS Radios!
http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q141/EMTrue1974/Camping%20Prep/DSC00417.jpg

hiker chick
05-19-2008, 07:51 AM
Now I can shop vicariously through you, Mrs. Anthony!! :)

Ya'll going somewhere for Memorial Weekend?

With you on the Keens -- love them! When not in pumps, those are my summer shoes. And they're like M&Ms, so many great colors... A red pair are permanently stowed in the teardrop.

Walkies - yes, makes roadtripping much better. Can be a great tactical advantage in heavy traffic, too.

I'm interested in that dog waterer. Looks far better than a bucket that gets polluted with tree debris and insects.

Love those duffels! How smart to have the names on. Where did you get those? Are the names taped on?

Mrs.Anthony337
05-19-2008, 07:57 AM
The dog waterer is from Petsmart-think was $14.

The duffel bags are from a Army Navy surplus store- they are olive green in color and they have several sizes, we got them big enough to hold the sleeping bags, shoes and clothes. I don't recall the pricing. We actually used a huge sharpie pen to write the names on them- my husband is an army brat and an eagle scout...that's how we decided to go with them, durable-will last forever. And you can just throw 'em over the shoulder and go.

We are headed back to the surplus store to get more goodies- I am thinking I want the bags pre-filled with camping clothes- so we can go camping on a whim and be ready to run out the door- and it'll keep the boys from ruining their everyday wear...so we're going to get some pants, shorts and thermo underwear and hats and such from there too.

Keens-they had some kool pinkish ones on sale- but they didnt have my size!! grr!!! :) I will definitely go back for more, asap!

hiker chick
05-19-2008, 09:55 AM
I am thinking I want the bags pre-filled with camping clothes- so we can go camping on a whim and be ready to run out the door- and it'll keep the boys from ruining their everyday wear

Great plan. Makes camping all the better when you have less to pack and lessen the odds you'll forget something critical: like underwear.

:)

Alchemy
05-19-2008, 10:32 AM
Great plan. and lessen the odds you'll forget something critical: like underwear.

:)


*Insert your own funny story here*

But camping is one of those times I choose to leave the underwear at home, but I'm a guy and I have hippie roots.

Mrs. Anthony cool shoes! Here are my new ones, and it's finally warm enough to wear them for the rafting trip this weekend!

P.S. got an email from your hubby the other day, can't wait to meet you two in August!

Junebug
05-20-2008, 10:30 PM
Has anyone brought up the new REI line of camping gear? Looks nice, but I didn't see anything revolutionary yet.

paulj
05-21-2008, 12:19 AM
Has anyone brought up the new REI line of camping gear?.
I glanced at the latest catalog, and browsed a store recently, but nothing jumped out as being a 'new line'. The catalog had more emphasis on some family camping items - tents etc. Which items do you have in mind (not that I'm in the market for anything new)?

Junebug
05-21-2008, 02:16 AM
I meant this stuff (http://www.rei.com/reifurniture?cm_re=lc*lc*REI_Furniture_LP). I got an email announcing it, so I thought it was new, but maybe just re-packaged on the website?

hiker chick
05-21-2008, 06:44 AM
Some of this "new" REI stuff has shown up at REI in the last year but you're right: none of it is "new" to the marketplace. If I did not already have a camp kitchen (or three) then I'd get this one:

Camping & Hiking > Furniture > Tables > REI Camp Kitchen (Item 765279)
http://media.rei.com/media/v/1461226.jpg (http://www.rei.com/features/zoom.html?img440=/media/v/1461050%26style=765279%26sku=7652790010&imageServiceHost=http://www.rei.com/&productInfoServiceHost=http://www.rei.com/&TB_iframe=true&height=513&width=700)
I have the stripped down generic version that Cabelas has been selling for several years (for about $70). This REI (being branded under Kelty, I think) has the nice addition of that cabinet and the windscreen. That's probably worth the added $ It's solidly constructed and compact.

I received the same e-mail and it was a wasted effort to peak my interest.

But good to see them focusing more on car camping.

boley
05-21-2008, 09:33 AM
I don't think I have posted this before but my current favorite camping (and general outdoors) item is this: Tilley Airflo Hat (Item 721740)

http://media.rei.com/media/677418.jpg


Tilley guarantees for life that their hats will not wear out, shrink or fall apart!
Hat offers excellent UV protection with a UPF 50 rating--the maximum rating given!
Wide, stiff brim keeps the sun and rain off your face and neck
Closed-cell foam in the top makes hat float if it goes overboard, making it a great companion for boating too
Hidden velcro pocket in the crown for storage of I.D., hotel key or money
Soft, comfortable Hydrofil® band wicks away perspiration
Special cord wraps under chin and back of head to keep hat in place in high winds
Machine washable, will not shrink; repels rain and mildew



Any hat that can survive being eaten by an elephant (3 times!) is ok by me. And it really keep the sun off.

Junebug
05-21-2008, 09:38 AM
But good to see them focusing more on car camping.


And yet terrifying ... you know they're gonna come up with something I need soon. :rolleyes:

Have we talked about games we bring along? I'm in a search for my Wham-O brand Lawn Fishing game, but found Birdie Golf and Ring Toss.

Old Blue
05-21-2008, 02:27 PM
Camping & Hiking > Furniture > Tables > REI Camp Kitchen (Item 765279)
http://media.rei.com/media/v/1461226.jpg (http://www.rei.com/features/zoom.html?img440=/media/v/1461050%26style=765279%26sku=7652790010&imageServiceHost=http://www.rei.com/&productInfoServiceHost=http://www.rei.com/&TB_iframe=true&height=513&width=700)


I've also seen it at either Sam's Club or Costco - although I can't remember the price :-|