Tire pressure on Yoko Geolander HTS' [Archive] - Honda Element Owners Club Forum

: Tire pressure on Yoko Geolander HTS'


Nickel II
10-30-2007, 07:04 PM
I put the Yokohama Geolander HTS on my E a few months back.

On the pluses - I love the handling (more responsive in turns) and the road noise has gone down.

On the negatives - at 32 psi front and 34 psi rear, the acceleration seems to have taken a hit and my MPG have gone down about 2 mpg.

What sort of psi are those of you with this tire running? It has been a while since I considered deviating from the auto-manufacturer's psi specs, but I'm considering it here.

Yoko's specs are (I'm not even sure what this means so someone help me out) maximum load at cold tire pressure of 1709 @ 35psi. Sidewall says to not exceed 40psi to seat beads.

ApriliaGuy
10-31-2007, 07:14 AM
Try 35 all around for a week. You could even try 38.

I think you'll like 35.

Can't hurt to try....a cheap and easy (and reversable) mod. :wink:

Will

Twilightzero
10-31-2007, 09:08 AM
I run 38 front and rear, it helps handling and mileage IMMENSELY. Even at that PSI, you're nowhere NEAR the max weight so you won't hurt anything. Give it a try, I think you'll be highly surprised!

Mark C
10-31-2007, 09:10 AM
I run 34 all four tires.

Nickel II
10-31-2007, 11:58 AM
I run 38 front and rear, it helps handling and mileage IMMENSELY. Even at that PSI, you're nowhere NEAR the max weight so you won't hurt anything. Give it a try, I think you'll be highly surprised!

Thanks. So what does "maximum load at cold tire pressure of 1709 @ 35psi" mean?

I bumped it up to 38 and can notice the difference. Just want to understand the the 35psi means on the Yoko specs. Is that a load of 1709 for 1 tire (so in reality you have 4x1709) or for 1709 for all 4 tires?

Thinking out load I guess it makes sense that is for one tire. The E weighs more than 1709.

Twilightzero
10-31-2007, 12:43 PM
Thanks. So what does "maximum load at cold tire pressure of 1709 @ 35psi" mean?

I bumped it up to 38 and can notice the difference. Just want to understand the the 35psi means on the Yoko specs. Is that a load of 1709 for 1 tire (so in reality you have 4x1709) or for 1709 for all 4 tires?

Thinking out load I guess it makes sense that is for one tire. The E weighs more than 1709.

That's 1709 for each tire, or 6836 for vehicle + cargo + fluids, etc. Your E will never, ever get close to that. I've actually seen them used on large conversion vans that weigh a good 5500 lbs so you're plenty safe.

Nickel II
10-31-2007, 10:27 PM
Thanks everyone!

Twilightzero
11-01-2007, 08:05 AM
NP, let us know the results :D

orange_spokes
11-01-2007, 09:28 AM
i bumped my yokos up to 40psi at all corners, and it feels more resposive...it could be just my mind telling me its better...but so far i would recommend it..

Mark C
11-01-2007, 02:45 PM
That is overpressure.

Twilightzero
11-01-2007, 02:56 PM
That is overpressure.

No really :rolleyes: The whole discussion here is that at the rated pressure, the acceleration and mileage are decreased and one can get better performance and handling from them by bumping them up a bit.

Mark C
11-01-2007, 06:55 PM
I'm sorry, but 35 psi is listed at the maximum pressure at maximum load on MY Yokohama Geolandar HTS tires. That is COLD. The tires heat up and are over 35 when at maximum inflation. (AND) There is a seperate warning to NOT inflate to over 40 to set the bead! ANYTHING over 35 is overpressure, and frankly suggesting to someone that they purposefully overinflate their tires is wrong! ...and dangerous.

Twilightzero
11-01-2007, 07:52 PM
I'm sorry, but 35 psi is listed at the maximum pressure at maximum load on MY Yokohama Geolandar HTS tires. That is COLD. The tires heat up and are over 35 when at maximum inflation. (AND) There is a seperate warning to NOT inflate to over 40 to set the bead! ANYTHING over 35 is overpressure, and frankly suggesting to someone that they purposefully overinflate their tires is wrong! ...and dangerous.

Generally I would agree with you, however there is a large number of people here who have all tried it first and found it to work extremely well. Yes, it's outside of the manufacturer's specs. But so is loading my Element with 1000 pounds of slate tile. And pulling anything over 1500 pounds. And putting a turbocharger on. And rewiring your side marker lights to be turn signals. And adding a sixth gear to the transmission. And having your brakes done by a non-professional. And about a million other things we all do here.

The point is that we all know it's out of spec but we collectively trust the experiences of the group and the group's pioneers.

I could also run through some of the math of why it's a calculated risk since the Element is so far under the tires' max weight specs, but it's late and I'm too lazy...:rolleyes:

Mark C
11-02-2007, 08:20 AM
Your experience counts for nothing of the design of the tire. Yokohama has a specific warning on the sidewall to NOT seat the bead over 40 psi, which is a COLD setting. You propose to give the tire that much, and subject the tire to a hot reading (warmed up) OVER 40 psi? That's asking for trouble. Anybody who abuses a tire like that will likely have problems at speed.

Go ahead and show me your math. As a Mechanical Engineer, I can probably understand anything you can show me...:rolleyes: The Element is not all that far under the weight and load rating of the tire. (Just exactly HOW MUCH weight transfers to the outside tire on a curve or turn?) THE TIRE HAS A MAXIMUM STATIC WARNING ON THE SIDEWALL OF "DO NOT EXCEED 40 PSI WHILE SETTING THE BEAD". Cannot be any plainer than that! 40 psi is an absolute, "DO NOT EXCEED THIS PRESSURE COLD IN STATIC CONDITIONS". Yet you exceed that in a dynamic, hot tire, higher than GVW? YIKES!

Further, I run my Geos at 34, and I cannot understand why anybody would say they, "it feels more resposive (sic)". It cannot be so. I get 28 mpg at 70 mph on the freeway at 34, good even wear, great load capability, and a fairly comforable ride (except over speed bumps), along with a perceptible noise.

At 40, or even 38, not only will the tire's ultimate strength be in question, but overinflation, especially at less than load rating, you will wear the center of the tread before the shoulders.

Anything over 35 psi cold is WRONG, and the practice should be stopped.... before somebody suffers a blowout going around a curve at 70 mph and rolls the E and hurts themselves.

If you insist upon overinflating the tire at this spec, at least go find an LT truck tire for your car. They generally have higher pressure inflations, but please check the Honda rim pressure limits first?

ApriliaGuy
11-02-2007, 12:22 PM
Just going to 35 is probablly enough to make a difference in handling...sure the 38 might be a bit better, but (for most people)not at the risk of exceding the sidewall specified limits (for any length of time for normal road use...I used to crank my 35psi tires on my '86 GTi up to 45 all the time when I was autocrossing).

The 38 and 40 numbers are popular w/ many people on this forum 'cause plenty of the popular tires (and the not too popular stockers) say "max inflation 44psi."

The biggest improvement in handling (imho from a bit of experimentation) is from raising the pressures in the front tires. Getting them up from 30 or 32 to something like 35 or 36 is just enough the front from understeering ("plowing" or not turning when the wheels are turned hard to one side or another) and delayed steering response in tight turns. The extra air reduces deflection in the tire (thus reducing heat and tire wear) and increases gas miliage and resistane to hydroplaning.

Will

Mark C
11-02-2007, 02:33 PM
The 38 and 40 numbers are popular w/ many people on this forum 'cause plenty of the popular tires (and the not too popular stockers) say "max inflation 44psi."


Exactly. That was one of my concerns with buying the Yoko Geolandars in the first place. I ran my stock Goodyears at 40, and I was fearful of a lower pressure tire. Turned out I was happy with them, and the recommended pressures from Honda were in order. However, the recommending of these specific tires, to an inflation OVER which they are intended is irresponsible and improper.

tangerine07lx
04-14-2008, 04:44 PM
ive been runnin my geolanders at 35 all around since i got them in december. havent noticed much of a milege difference and handeling is way better then the oem junk.

P-lip
04-19-2008, 02:16 PM
I've always ran my tires at 85% of the maximum sidewall pressure rating, in my Rabbit, my Element, even my old '77 Buick, if the tire says "Do Not Exceed 40psi..." I run 'em at 34 - which seems to be a magic number for the Geolander HTS'.

I found this interesting:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=73

Twilightzero
04-21-2008, 09:40 AM
I've always ran my tires at 85% of the maximum sidewall pressure rating, in my Rabbit, my Element, even my old '77 Buick, if the tire says "Do Not Exceed 40psi..." I run 'em at 34 - which seems to be a magic number for the Geolander HTS'.

I found this interesting:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=73

Interesting link, thanks for the post! I've read a lot of the Tire Rack's stuff but hadn't run across that one before. Good info in it!

NV_05_AWD
04-21-2008, 01:12 PM
I do 38 psi .... seems fine.

E-Watson
04-28-2008, 02:25 AM
Thanks, everyone for all the great advice. I recently inflated my Yokos to the max recommended (35psi, cold) and notice a big difference in the feel. :) Can't wait to see how it affects fuel consumption with gas prices the way they are :shock: My question is why there are vehicle max recommended tire pressures (32 front & 34 rear)? Doesn't it matter more about specific tire specs? :-? Note: The fuel consumption link automatically appeared when I posted - didn't do it myself.

ApriliaGuy
04-28-2008, 07:28 AM
My question is why there are vehicle max recommended tire pressures (32 front & 34 rear)? Doesn't it matter more about specific tire specs? :-?

Recomended tire pressures are determined by Honda's Engineering and Legal departments. It is long and complicated to explan, but they want to be sure that your E is more prone to understeer as opposed to overstear because it is "safer."
It is common practice among automobile manufacturers to configure production cars deliberately to have a slight linear range understeer by default. If a car understeers slightly, it tends to be more stable (within the realms of a driver of average ability) if a violent change of direction occurs, improving safety
(While is considered "safer" for you driving down the road, it is most definitly safer for them in court. :wink:)
A realitively low front tire pressure will cause a vehicle to understeer and react more slowly to steering inputs, google up understeer safety tire pressures (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=tire+pressure%2C+understeer%2C+safety&btnG=Google+Search)and see what you find.

IMHO...Honda went a little low (possibly in reaction to the Ford Exploder/Firestone debaucle) with their recomendations. Remember too, that Honda dosen't know what tire you might put on the vehicle, and give a recomendation based on factory tires and/or typical replacement tires, some of which are max rated at 35psi....so Honda prolly wouldn't want to put 36psi on the door sticker, even if that is a nice safe pressure w/ the factory tires. :wink:


Will

E-Watson
04-29-2008, 06:19 AM
Recomended (vehicle) tire pressures are... safer for them in court. :wink:)
Thanks, ApriliaGuy. I had never thought about this issue before and always went with the vehicle recommeded specs. :oops: Every time I look at this website I learn something new. Another confirmation of why I love the EOC !!!

erock1070
12-22-2008, 12:22 PM
Anybody have any mileage charts for the Geolanders at 32/34 ? and then at 35 all around ?

Curious if it makes that big a difference.