Correct Tire Pressure? [Archive] - Honda Element Owners Club Forum

: Correct Tire Pressure?


Beardog
01-18-2004, 09:48 PM
I was checking my tire pressure and noticed that the front tires are supposed to be inflated to 34psi as opposed to 32psi for the rear. Why is this so and what if they are inflated equally at 32psi?

HappyCamper
01-18-2004, 11:16 PM
[quote:e3d4e314eb=" "]I was checking my tire pressure and noticed that the front tires are supposed to be inflated to 34psi as opposed to 32psi for the rear. Why is this so and what if they are inflated equally at 32psi?[/quote:e3d4e314eb]

Beardog, I think it's the other way around ...... 32 front, 34 rear.

But anyway, the difference is because you have more weight up front. There was a lot of discussion on the subject in here, which led me to find a lot of web articles on the subject. From that reading, I reached the conclusion to stay with Honda's recommendation and check it at least monthly. Tire pressure is the easiest self-maintenance task for the owner, and it affects a lot of things ... including tire wear, traction against the road, quality of ride, handling safety, wear and tear on the suspension. I've stayed with the 32/34, and after 16000 miles my stock tires show very little wear, and the wear has been very even.

Your other question...... a couple of articles pointed out that US manufacturers always threw out one number, all around, without taking into account the weight difference. IMHO, the 32/34 shows that Honda put more thought into the numbers that they are recommending, so I'm staying with that.

Also, check it with your own quality gauge, don't trust the one at a gas station, since it's not uncommon for those to be several pounds off.

Hope this helps.

Beardog
01-19-2004, 12:23 AM
Thanks for the advice!

bluesman77
01-20-2004, 12:02 PM
Since the front pressure specification is less than the rear & weight distribution is just the opposite, 34 psi for the rear is probably to accomodate 4 passengers and/or cargo. Otherwise, the label in the door jam would have to include several pressures for different conditions. Car/Truck manufactures used to do this and motorcycle manufactures still do.

bluesman77

kskel123
01-26-2004, 05:18 PM
Hello to all. I have been in the automotive business for many years, and years ago I did sell and work on Hondas. I bought an Element and as directed, put the pressures to 32/34. The tires sagged and the ride was soft and mushy. As all may have noticed, the tire sidewall says max cold 44psi. As with all my vehicles, I adhere to this, within reason. Higher pressure=firmer/harsher ride with better fuel economy. I keep mine at 40 cold, which translates to 44 hot. THis has consistently been a good pressure setting for me. Try it, you may like it, and I occasionnally hit 25+ on highway driving.

Box!

bluesman77
01-26-2004, 06:41 PM
>SNIP< I keep mine at 40 cold, which translates to 44 hot. THis has consistently been a good pressure setting for me. Try it, you may like it, and I occasionally hit 25+ on highway driving.

Box!
_________________
Do you use 40 PSI front and rear and have you accumulated enough miles to see if the tread is wearing evenly across? I've always run my tires higher than factory recommendations, but not a 25% increase as you have done. I'm guessing there is also an improvement in cornering - have you noticed a difference?

bluesman77

BigFoot
01-26-2004, 09:16 PM
I always go with the numbers on the door post, 32/34, as I figure those dem dar Honda engineers are a lot smarter than I am!

kskel123
01-27-2004, 10:50 AM
Bluesman,

Yes, the cornering is much crisper. Amazingly enough though, I have not noticed a significant difference in bumpiness over ill-paved streets as I have noticed on previous vehicles. Regarding wear, the wear is dependent on the alignment and balancing, not the tire pressure. Increased tire pressure will however show irregular wear due to misallignment or unbalanced tires sooner. Furthermore, there is a wide range in opinions on the usefulness/performance of the Wrangler Tires that come stock. Still, more than 65% of those using the Wranglers noticed irregular or uneven wear on their tires. I will be documenting this and if I do notice premature deterioration of the tires, I will switch to a higher rated brand. Hope this helps. Btw, try the higher pressure for a week, you'll either love it or hate it. On my last vehicle, it translated into 47,000 miles before replacement on 35000 mile high wear tires.

:twisted:

mgrmln
01-27-2004, 12:33 PM
I had my tires balanced yesterday and two of my Wranglers needed to be turned on the rim to help quell the fact that they were out of round. Not too impressive.

BTW, regardless of the "factory balance" that was performed on our cars, i would recommened getting them professionally balanced (at a reputable place, of course).The factory balance job was way off.

Minsoo

bluesman77
01-27-2004, 08:47 PM
kskel123

Thanks for your response. I feel when manufactures quit listing multiple pressures for different loads, tire pressure recommendations became one size fits all. With varying payloads, speeds and driving styles - pressures should be adjusted accordingly. I've raced two and four wheeled vehicles in the past and also subscribe to raising pressures for high speed cornering.

Over inflation used to result in excessive wear in the center and underinflation on the edges. With radial tires construction, evidently that is no longer the case? Seems possible. Thanks again.

bluesman77

Bill in Houston
01-28-2004, 02:35 PM
[quote:db94a60cfa=" "]
Over inflation used to result in excessive wear in the center and underinflation on the edges. With radial tires construction, evidently that is no longer the case? Seems possible. Thanks again. [/quote:db94a60cfa]

I've been hanging out on Prius and Civic Hybrid boards for the last few years, and out of all the people there who have run the tire pressure up to 40-44 psi, noone has reported that they wore out the center faster than the edges. I don't think it ever happens on FWD cars with radial tires.

Bill

bluesman77
01-28-2004, 05:39 PM
I'm embarassed to say this is first I've heard of this. I've used higher pressure than specified for years, also never experienced increased center tread wear and just thought I was lucky. I never considered radial tires weren't subject to the same wear, relative to pressure, as the bias-ply design.

This knowledge will certainly take the worry out of future experiments with tire pressure. Thanks Bill and kskel123 for the education.

bluesman77

rinpoche
01-29-2004, 01:39 AM
great information. thanks again for a super helpful thread.

:D

Bill in Houston
01-29-2004, 09:16 AM
[quote:ee93e6efed=" "]I'm embarassed to say this is first I've heard of this. I've used higher pressure than specified for years, also never experienced increased center tread wear and just thought I was lucky. I never considered radial tires weren't subject to the same wear, relative to pressure, as the bias-ply design.
[/quote:ee93e6efed]

Interesting, huh? I have run my radials at 40 psi on a couple of cars and have never worn out the center before the edges. I do know for sure with radials that any hint of underinflation will result in the edges wearing very very rapidly compared to the edges. Have fun with your experiments and be safe.

Bill

bobsmith
02-03-2004, 03:52 PM
[quote:5fe840da34=" "][quote:5fe840da34=" "]
Over inflation used to result in excessive wear in the center and underinflation on the edges. With radial tires construction, evidently that is no longer the case? Seems possible. Thanks again. [/quote:5fe840da34]

I've been hanging out on Prius and Civic Hybrid boards for the last few years, and out of all the people there who have run the tire pressure up to 40-44 psi, noone has reported that they wore out the center faster than the edges. I don't think it ever happens on FWD cars with radial tires.

Bill[/quote:5fe840da34]

Today's automotive tires are complex systems. Tire pressure will affect tread wear -- as small a difference as 2 PSI can produce noticeable results in as little as 10,000 miles -- it depends upon the tire and the vehicle.

On my Acura (Honda) Integra, which has "low profile" tires, I used to run the front tires at 35 PSI, and the rear at 33, exactly as recommended by the manufacturer. However, this resulted in uneven tread wear in the front tires -- the center of the tread wore more than the outside edges. Once I observed that, I began to experiment with changing the tire pressure... and found that running the front tires at 33 produced more even tread wear. However, the handling suffered --not too much, but noticebly. Cornering wasn't as precise as it had been at 35 PSI.

My new Element has only 250 miles on it. For now I'm planning to run at 32/34, according to Honda's specs. The tires don't sag at all, and they don't feel "mushy". I use a very accurate tire pressure gauge that has an analog dial on it. I can "read between the marks" and adjust pressures accurately to within about .25 PSI.

Unless you're running low profile tires on your Element, why even bother to talk about "performance handling" ?

bluesman77
02-04-2004, 08:13 AM
“Unless you're running low profile tires on your Element, why even bother to talk about "performance handling" ?”

Many reviews of the Element have stated how the wide track and relatively low center of gravity have resulted in car-like cornering performance (unlike most of its other SUV brethren). Reading about the fun to drive characteristic is what drew me to this vehicle in the first place. Other than the Austin Mini, I can’t recall of another vehicle, in recent times, where “fun to drive” is mentioned so universally.

To infer our discussing performance handling (w/ stock tires) is pointless seems a little harsh. For those of us who like to take corners as fast as practical and enjoy what is available, any improvement is worthwhile. “Talking” about this topic is exactly why this forum was created.

You can use your one-size fits all pressures and measure them to within a quarter PSI, but please don’t ridicule those of us who wish to tailor ours to the way we drive.

bluesman77

bobsmith
02-04-2004, 08:46 AM
[quote:0ad687cf3c=" "]“Unless you're running low profile tires on your Element, why even bother to talk about "performance handling" ?”
...
To infer our discussing performance handling (w/ stock tires) is pointless seems a little harsh.
...
You can use your one-size fits all pressures and measure them to within a quarter PSI, but please don’t ridicule those of us who wish to tailor ours to the way we drive.

bluesman77[/quote:0ad687cf3c]

Hm....
Sorry if my remarks seemed insensitive. I really didn't intend them that way. :?

Let me restate my comment:
If you really want to explore high-performance handling in the Element or any other vehicle, switch over to "low profile" tires. The differences in handling that you may experience by experimenting with different tire pressures depend upon the tires you're driving.

------------

Also, I don't understand what you meant by:
You can use your one-size fits all pressures ?

bobsmith
02-04-2004, 09:21 AM
Two terms commonly used in regard to steering are "oversteer" and "understeer". For those who aren't familiar with those terms, oversteer is used to describe a condition where a vehicle tends to turn more than you anticipated it would, i.e., you enter a corner, turning the steering wheel to follow the curve, and then suddenly you have to ease off on the steering wheel because the vehicle is turning more than you wanted.

Understeer is pretty much the opposite... the vehicle tends to "want to go" to the outside of the curve, and you need to apply steady pressure to the steering wheel in order to keep the vehicle turning.

Of the two, understeer is more predictable and easier to control. I've read that Honda vehicles tend to be designed with "predictable understeer".

How does tire pressure figure into this? Overinflation of the front tires tends to cause oversteer. Lower pressure = understeer.

If you want to mess around with your tire pressures, just make sure you get an accurate pressure gauge and learn to use it properly. Learn how temperature affects tire pressure, and be wary of oversteer. In some situations oversteer can cause a vehicle to become very difficult to control.

bluesman77
02-04-2004, 09:28 AM
Sorry if my reply was a little a strong, but I just felt you were objecting to what makes this forum so good. My "one-size fits all" referenced the pressures listed in the door jam. On a vehicle with such front-end weight bias, recommended pressure for the front would normally be higher than that of the rear. Since Honda lists a higher setting for the rear, I'm guessing it is in anticipation of maximum payload - whether it be passengers or cargo.

The previous discussions regarding usage of the same pressure at all four corners, I believe, was intended for spirited driving without heavy cargo.

Incidentally, I also use a very accurate gauge from my racing days and try to keep things as precise as possible.

bluesman77

kato76
02-05-2004, 06:38 AM
Hello all, I'm going to be the guinee pig on this one. I'm going to do this today I'm driving roughly 450 miles to Pittsburgh PA, from CT and returning Sunday so roughly 900 miles of driving (give or take) . I am taking a tred measurement tonight be for I leave and I am going to use the 40 psi cold for the trip (i normally keep it at the door settings).We will now see what we get for tred ware and gas economy. I'll let you guys know after my trip on Monday

kskel123
02-07-2004, 07:53 PM
Hi all,
It looks like the forum has sorted out this issue which is good. I have only comment. Regarding high performance tires, I guess you could use them on an Element and get crisper and rougher handling over street bumps. However, a "thin" tire such as this will also affect your actual speed and mileage since the tires are not as "thick" as stock.

I develop residential subdivisions and I purchased the Element to use offroad and onroad. All Hondas except for the NSX and the performance tuned acuras have understeer. The Element exhibited these "Honda" characteristics at the 32/34 pressures. It does not come close to oversteer characteristics even at the 40 cold pressures.

Also, the reason most of us do not use the low-profile high-performance tires is because we do take the vehicle off pavement relatively often and yet we also like to take corners quickly without plowing into the family staring at you through the windows of their Buick Lesabre.

Take care all,

K

bobsmith
02-08-2004, 07:43 AM
[quote:8944546959="K"]...All Hondas except for the NSX and the performance tuned acuras have understeer. The Element exhibited these "Honda" characteristics at the 32/34 pressures. It does not come close to oversteer characteristics even at the 40 cold pressures...[/quote:8944546959]

Here's a great explaination of understeer, oversteer, and tire performance:
http://pw1.netcom.com/~gentile/Vigor/Timely1101.htm

The Acura Vigor appears to be "tuned" to have mild to moderate understeer. Ditto for the NSX, at least according to the research I've done. Also, my Acura Integra GSR clearly is tuned to have understeer. I know this from personal experience when entering a highway offramp at much too high a speed. Luckily I managed to stay on the pavement! :shock:

K, I'm confused about something you wrote...
[quote:8944546959="K"]Also, the reason most of us do not use the low-profile high-performance tires is because we do take the vehicle off pavement relatively often and yet we also like to take corners quickly without plowing into the family staring at you through the windows of their Buick Lesabre.[/quote:8944546959]

You seem to assume that using low profile tires off pavement would result in less traction?

There is another effect produced by increasing tire pressure... the size of the contact patch is reduced, resulting in less traction. This can be observed as the feel of the steering changes -- it takes less effort to turn the steering wheel. I grew up driving small British sports cars, all of which seemed to have really "heavy" steering -- it took a lot of effort to turn the steering wheel. Perhaps that's why I prefer that kind of feel in the steering wheel. When I've experimented with higher tire pressures, the reduction in effort required to turn the steering wheel has always bothered me.

Once again it comes down to personal preference. No one is "wrong" about any of this stuff, we simply all have our own preferences. 8)

kskel123
02-08-2004, 01:20 PM
Hi all,

I sometimes post after a loaded coffee, this explains my poor typing in my last post. It also ties into my blanket statement about Acuras and Hondas. Yes, they all have understeer. In truth, the only real cars I have ever driven with true oversteer are rear-engined porsches. I have a 63' 356 Super 90 convertible that has true oversteer because you can wag the tail around corners. This was "corrected" in the 986 and 996 models in the late 1990s. However, the current issue Boxtster S will wag the tail with appropriate throttle. Considering that oversteer cars are typically rear-wheel drive, I doubt that you could ever get true oversteer in any of their front-wheel vehicles.

Also, I read the post that tires have a lower contact patch with higher pressure. The assumption is that a lesser contact patch, which I'm not even sure is true, would decrease traction. Modern tires perform best when the tread does not sag and allows the separate patches and channels to make full contact to the road. Also, if lesser pressure leads to understeer and plowing, then it would stand to reason that the higher pressure car that does handle better in corners by not plowing would have better traction, whether or not there is a smaller contact patch or not. If the sides sag and touch the pavement, that does not necessarily equate to better traction. http://www.ridemyown.com/articles/technical/tires_insidestory.shtml

Oops, the wife wants me to take the dog out.

See y'all,

K :roll: :roll: :roll:

kato76
02-13-2004, 08:40 AM
First off I would like to say sorry about the delay....

And now we begin

I started my trip with the tire pressure at 40 cold which is roughly 44 hot, the noticible differences were that the E was a little crisper on turns (meaning it seemed to hold on a little ) and a lot more bumpier to say the least. A good difference I did noticed was that in snow/slush/ice (crap to say the least) it seemed to be more controlable, most of the trip down to Pittsburgh was driven at an average of 65 (becasue of the snow) on the way home 75. The fuel economy lessened if anything I Found I got worse gas milage this trip having my tire pressure higher than what I normally set it at (ie the door settings). I would normally get 23-25 on the highway this trip (with out the snow) I got 21-23 if that. The tread wear was minimal if anything (but this is only 900 miles, not even close to the life of the tire)

:twisted: :twisted:

TopDog
02-13-2004, 01:51 PM
[quote:9cff955f2a=" "]
The fuel economy lessened if anything I Found I got worse gas milage this trip having my tire pressure higher than what I normally set it at (ie the door settings). I would normally get 23-25 on the highway this trip (with out the snow) I got 21-23 if that.

:twisted: :twisted:[/quote:9cff955f2a]

I wonder if there was something else contributing to this lower mpg?

Bill in Houston
02-15-2004, 04:22 PM
[quote:bcaafd85b5=" "]I wonder if there was something else contributing to this lower mpg?[/quote:bcaafd85b5]

I think that driving in wet and slushy conditions will lower your mileage. Takes extra power to sling the water up in the air, and to push slush out of the way. Also, lower temps will nearly always give lower mileage, so that may have been a factor.

kato76
02-17-2004, 08:09 AM
[quote:4d1d80959a=" "] Also, lower temps will nearly always give lower mileage, so that may have been a factor.[/quote:4d1d80959a]
That could possibly be the trip home wasa whopping 10 degrees not counting wind factor. Very wiondy that day as well. so I was fighting a bit as well.

:twisted: :twisted:

Honu
02-17-2004, 11:32 PM
weird, it DOES say 32psi FRONT and 34psi REAR on the door! counter intuitive for sure.

Based on past experience with my similar wheel size and weight truck, honda engineer/marketing decision on the door, and the 40psi recommendation here, I split the diff and cranked up the tires 4psi to 36psi front and 38psi rear.

maybe its my imagination, but WOW! I think handling/freeway traction is significantly better and a nice balance of rough ride versus tight handling.(e.g. 70mph wet, or dry mountain freeway....scene of many spinouts)

I shall see how the tire wear goes, but anyway I want an excuse to swap out original crapola tires :? to siped Arizonian Silver Edition tires which I discovered as an incredible Best Buy, MAJOR traction tire on my 4wd nissan truck....just before I sold it for the Element. I hope the silver editions will be available in the Element size when that eventually happens. Too cheap to dump new tires.....

Bill in Houston
02-18-2004, 02:18 PM
[quote:652ecd5376=" "]
That could possibly be the trip home wasa whopping 10 degrees not counting wind factor. Very wiondy that day as well. so I was fighting a bit as well.[/quote:652ecd5376]

Wow, forgot to mention that. Any headwind or even a crosswind can drop your mileage quite a bit too. It's amazing what an impact it can have.

Bill

harrisjr156
07-01-2006, 04:28 PM
I have a new set of Toyo Open Country H/T's in size 225x70x16. The maximum inflation pressure marked on this tire is 35 psi (I assume this is the maximum cold pressure). This tire is rated for 60,000 miles of service. They ride very, very smoothly. The OEM Goodyear Wranglers were awful!

What would be your tire pressure recommendation(s) for a light to moderate load of about 480 pounds consisting of two adults (total 360 pounds) and two small children (total 100 pounds) plus about 20 pounds for my toolbox that I usually carry?

When the tires were installed they were inflated to 36 psi (cold) front/rear. I reduced the pressure to 31psi front/33psi rear (cold) and my E didn't ride as well and bumps, seams in the road, and pot holes were more noticeable.

I'm thinking of inflating both front and rear tires to 34 psi (cold) to somewhat decrease the rolling resistance of the tires and stay reasonably close to Honda's recommended tire pressures. The door sticker reads 32 front/34 rear.

Since 34psi in the rear is okay with Honda I would guess that 34psi would be okay for the front too.

ApriliaGuy
07-02-2006, 03:55 PM
FWIW:

I've been using about 38 to even 40psi in the front, and about 35 in the rear. I like the way the handling improved (noticably less understear). The tires (as crapy as the stockers are) are wearing very evenly....and lasting far longer than I expected 'em too. They still look decent at 25,000 miles, but i'll be replacing them this fall, if only for piece of mind. (I usually only put about 2,000 miles on the E from April to november)

Can't say what effect it has on the fuel miliage.....I played around w/ various tire pressures the first month I got the car.....I found the 38F/35R set up before the car was even "broken in" and haven't had a need/desire to vary the pressures much. I tiried lotsa combos (all the way down to 30psi) to try and improve traction, but the E's tires still seem to slip a bit too much, especially in the wet or snow. I'm looking forward to the new tires.....i'll re-evaluate tire pressure then)

Will

Will

hownowcb
07-02-2006, 06:29 PM
I just removed my original equipment tires at 29,000 mile, and was astonished to discover I have plenty of tread depth left. I've been running mine consistently at 35psi front and rear. Having switched to 30 x 9.5 x 15 tires I've noticed tons of differences in the new rubber. But was amused to discover the tire shop had inflated the new tires to exactly what I've been running: 35psi front and rear.

The new tires are quieter (a surprise, considering the tread is somewhat more aggressive), softer riding (not a surprise, considering the much-taller sidewalls), and the front end doesn't "hunt" at all, thankfully. I haven't entered corners as aggressively with the new tires as I've done historically, waiting for them to "take a set", and for me to get used to all the potential grip differences. So far, they seem a little too soft perhaps, so I'm inclined to move up toward 40psi with these.

I always found the difference a mere 2-3 psi made with the stock tires rather astonishing. The higher the pressure, the crisper the cornering, but the much harsher the jounce on rough pavement. Still, I'll take the slightly harsher ride rather than mushy cornering and premature edge wear on the treads.

It was also pleasing to discover, upon mentally recalculating my odometer/speedometer against my GPS this afternoon, to discover a nice, round 5% incremental change. For novices, it means I add 5% to my indicated mileage before dividing by gallons put in the fuel tank, to arrive at the new, corrected fuel mileage. Same ratio applies to indicated speed -- if my speedometer indicates 60 mph, for example, I'm actually going 63.

jvacierto
09-21-2006, 07:47 AM
I apologize for the REALLY late reply to this post, but I'd like to comment on harrisjr156's question:

I also have Toyo Opent Country H/T's on my E, which I got a little over a month ago. I inflated them to the door jam recommendations of 32/34psi and I notice the steering felt heavier.

The 35psi max on the tirewall is actually only applicable for the stated weight (around 1700lbs., I think). Since the E only weights about 3400lbs., you've got far less than 1700lbs. per tire (850lbs.). If you read the smaller print, Toyo actually states the max pressure is 40psi, which is consistent with most modern tire designs which have maxes of 40 or 44psi.

I recently discovered the max pressure - 10% rule, which means you take the max psi and subtract 10% from it. So 40 - 4 (10% of 40) = 36psi. It's not a hard number, but different place to start compared to Honda's recommendations. I've set all my tires to 36psi and I noticed the steering felt lighter and crisper with no real noticeable change in ride roughness. I'm going to keep this setting and see how the tires wear over time, but I would say don't be afraid to experiment within a reasonable range, i.e. don't go over 40psi.

Igneouss
09-21-2006, 09:47 AM
Auto manufacturer's stated tire pressures are a huge compromise. Factors include the tire manufacturer, handling characteristics, ride, tire wear, intended use of the vehicle, all sorts of things. The largest factor recently is liability. Manufacturers of high center of gravity SUVs discovered that they can change the stated tire pressure in such a way as to lessen the likelyhood of a roll-over. I know for example that both Ford and Saturn recalled SUVs for roll over issues. In both cases the vehicles got a new door sticker with changed tire pressures.

The idea that the manufacture knows best is true if you agree with the nature of the compromises that they make.

Personally, I am smart enough to change my tire pressure when necessary. Most of the time I run pressures higher than the door sticker. I give a higher weight to fuel economy. So this works for me.

If you personal preference is ride quality, then run lower pressure. If you are more concerned about maximum cornering and breaking limits, then spend some time chatting with auto crossers and you'll get an education in adhesion and contact patches and a good idea what pressure to run. If maximum tire life is your thing then contact tire rack. I'm sure they can give you lots of good info.

If you don't want to worry about it (probably like most folks) then run the pressures shown on your door jamb and forget about it.

BTW: If you have non-stock size tires then the door jamb values no longer apply because the complicated compromise that results in the door sticker psi value is for the stock size tire (and maybe even the stock tire).

Cheers

tooljedi
09-21-2006, 10:14 AM
I must agree with Igneouss on this one!

I run higher pressures after doing much research on tires. My Yokohamas Geolanders SS's are very differn't that the stock POS Goodyears that came with my ride. I run the front at 42psi & the rear at 40 psi. I find they are wearing very well and I feel like I am getting better performance. I have not scientifically measured it, but I seem to be filling the gas tank a little less often. I am going to start checking this to verify my mpg are better. 8-)

hownowcb
09-25-2006, 07:36 PM
Too early to tell about eventual tire wear on my replacement Pirelli Scorpions, but when they were installed at 29,000 miles, the dealer had them inflated to 36 psi all-around. Which still felt awfully soft compared to my stock Good Years at 35 psi all-around. (Due to far larger overall tire volume and taller sidewalls on the Pirellis?)

Shame on me! I checked the tire pressure last night (3,500 miles later) and they'd uniformly dropped to 32 psi. So...as promised earlier, I pushed them to 40 psi all-around to see how that goes. Which still leaves them feeling softer than the stock Good Years, but also a good 10 psi shy of the 50 psi "maximum limit" printed on the sidewalls!

I wish I had a valid excuse to buy dedicated winter tires to put on my stock rims, but the forecast is for yet another "sissy" winter, due to El Nino (or global warming - take your pick), so I'm sticking with what I have until things change. We shall see...