Winter Tires [Archive] - Honda Element Owners Club Forum

: Winter Tires


RWP
06-24-2004, 11:27 AM
Hey all,

I realize it is officially summer, but.....

I remember seeing a great post on some Bridgestone winter tires that someone had mounted, but can't seem to find it...anyone have that thread ?

Einstein
06-24-2004, 11:47 AM
This one?

Einstein's Tire Rack Upgrade (http://www.elementownersclub.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=4451)

RWP
06-24-2004, 11:59 AM
Yep...that's the one !

THANKS

boxonw
06-24-2004, 01:24 PM
[quote:1f8de3fb2d=" "]Hey all,

I realize it is officially summer, but.....

I remember seeing a great post on some Bridgestone winter tires that someone had mounted, but can't seem to find it...anyone have that thread ?[/quote:1f8de3fb2d]

It is good to think ahead, I usually buy my winter tires in the summer.
They're usually avialable and also at a discounted price.

By the way, if you like Brigdestone Blizzak check out Nokian's tyres, Nokian
know a thing or two about snow tires.

I got my winter tire from Tire Factory, they have the best price all around and free shipping on all Nokian's tire.

http://www.tirefactory.net/AbouUs.htm

Take care, :D

fhaxton
07-04-2004, 10:20 PM
I've used Nokian Hakapilliita 1's on a front wheel drive and passed many a 4WD in the mountains in bad snow. Incredible snow tire without major disadvantages on dry pavement. They discontinued the 1's and now make a "2" that has the studs already in it. They don't make the 2 in a size for the "E". There are some other Nokian tires that fit the E and I think I will stick with them. The blizzaks have good ice/snow traction, but wear very fast and are squirrley at high speeds. The Hakkapelliita SUV is the only
Nokian tires in the proper size for the E.

hownowcb
07-06-2004, 10:15 PM
The factory stock tires work great in the winter if you have under 20,000 miles on them. Oh, I know, there are a bunch here who apparently feel compelled to go 90 miles an hour on ice and snow, but you know what? I'm strongly against that concept! If you need to go faster than you can with the factory fresh tires, just let me know, because I don't want to be within about 500 miles of you this winter, or any winter, for that matter. I'm not against the concept of winter-specific tires, having owned them myself for most of my adult life; I just don't like the tone of the posters who whine about the lack of winter capabilities of the stock tires, considering I've spent a solid winter on them, and have no complaints. And I'm ordinarily one damn fussy critic of stock rubber!

If you feel compelled to spend money on tires and/or wheels, use what came stock in the winter and splurge for the bling on summer tires and wheels.

Or, just pony up and do whatever you want.

Einstein
07-07-2004, 06:21 AM
If winter tires can make the difference between going in a ditch or not going in a ditch, I'll invest in winter tires every time. It's hilly around here... winter tires make the difference between getting up my driveway or not making it.

Going with winter tires lets me buy a better summer tire, since I keep them on different wheels. Expecting one all-season tire to do everything well when you live where four seasons is typical but not reasonable.

Just because I want confidence in my driving, it doesn't mean I plan to drive 90 in snow. However, I don't think it's right that totally unprepared drivers are making themselves a rolling road block.

There are always winter drivers who's skills and equipment are borderline for keeping the vehicle on the road in the winter. I'm sure they share your attitude toward "stock tires are good enough". I can't change their ways, but I sure as hell not going to put up with their blasting me for choosing to be prepared for the conditions.

[quote:a0d6087897="hownowcb"]The factory stock tires work great in the winter if you have under 20,000 miles on them. Oh, I know, there are a bunch here who apparently feel compelled to go 90 miles an hour on ice and snow, but you know what? I'm strongly against that concept! If you need to go faster than you can with the factory fresh tires, just let me know, because I don't want to be within about 500 miles of you this winter, or any winter, for that matter. I'm not against the concept of winter-specific tires, having owned them myself for most of my adult life; I just don't like the tone of the posters who whine about the lack of winter capabilities of the stock tires, considering I've spent a solid winter on them, and have no complaints. And I'm ordinarily one damn fussy critic of stock rubber!

If you feel compelled to spend money on tires and/or wheels, use what came stock in the winter and splurge for the bling on summer tires and wheels.

Or, just pony up and do whatever you want.[/quote:a0d6087897]

boxonw
07-07-2004, 01:16 PM
There is no if about winter tires make a difference, I'll put my last dollar on any set of winter tires that go against all season radial.

No! I don't put snow tires on so I could goes 90 mph down the road. Snow tires have great benefit beside stop and go, good steering control, maintain good gas mileage during winter driving.

Hownowcb, folk like Einstein and I take great pride in safety and how we get from point A to point B. Einstein and I can't help how others drive but we're sure how we'll be driving when Oldman Winter come around.

Beside no ones here complained about OEM tire winter performance, as I recalled some did mentioned low mileage wared for such premium priced.

We're here to share infos on snow tires and where you can get them for the best price.

Take care,

hownowcb
07-08-2004, 12:34 AM
I remain a proponent of winter-specific tires, but since I live in the city now, 99% of my winter driving is on clean, dry pavement - where winter tires can sometimes be under-performers! When I lived in the country, I used Vredesteins purchased locally at Twin City Tire for many years, and have more recently been impressed with winter Pirelli's from TireRack. Almost impossible to beat TireRack for prices these days, no matter where you live. Occasionally, Sears has competitive package deals on winter wheel and tire combos, but that's a timing thing.

Once my factory tires have become marginal, I'll end up going back to the summer/winter tire changeover routine, but didn't want people to end up with the impression that the factory tires are worthless for general winter use. At least they're rated for all-season use. Some higher performance four-wheel-drive vehicles come with summer-only high performance tires, which are decidedly not appropriate for any kind of winter use.

Einstein
07-08-2004, 07:19 AM
[quote:82506972b2=" "]I didn't want people to end up with the impression that the factory tires are worthless for general winter use.

At least they're rated for all-season use. Some higher performance four-wheel-drive vehicles come with summer-only high performance tires, which are decidedly not appropriate for any kind of winter use.[/quote:82506972b2]

There are three levels of tires that are made for cold-weather conditions.

Plain "all season" tires do not have to meet certain criteria I've ever seen. In general the tread compound does not get "glassy" (hard) at temperatures below freezing. Therefore they continue to be rubbery instead of plasticy. They also have SOME siping in order to help with grip, but not enough to be competent by any means in wintry conditions. "Touring" tires are the best example of plain "all-season" tires, but they really aren't any good in snow.

"M+S" Mud and snow tires also do not meet an industry testing requirement... again it's up to the tire manufacturer to add the designation. These tires start with an all-season compound and add and aggressive tread pattern and more siping in order to hold solid material in the tread. Tires with "M+S" will generally be noisier than those without the designation. If you want a year-round tire that is reasonably good in the winter, you want one with the "M+S" designation. But use common sense, the tire manufacturers puts "M+S" on touring tires sometimes but I've found they still can't handle basic winter conditions. You have to compare tread patterns and judge for yourself whether or not the tire may be aggressive. You can also use Tire Rack's consumer feedback survey summaries to compare different tire's ability to handle snow.

The final step up is an "Ice+Snow" tire, designated by the snowflake symbol. These take M+S to the next level by using special tread compounds that are either very soft at low temperatures, very porous or have hard filler materials. All these attributes help grip on very low coefficient of friction surfaces like plain ice. There are two levels, "H" rated tires that can handle speeds over 100 MPH, and "Q" rated that give up high speed capabilities for the ultimate ice and snow traction. These tires wear out very fast and are not given treadwear rating nor warranty. The tires I use on the element in the winter (see link above) are of the Q variety.

"Summer-only" tires are just like the ones that came stock on my S2000. At temperatures below 50F they are very unpredictable and lose grip easily. I use "all-season" Dunlop SP5000s in the late fall through early spring. Not because I drive the car in wintry conditions, but because I want safe handling in the dry at low temperatures.

Hope this helps!

fhaxton
07-08-2004, 08:20 AM
Here in the mountains of VA we can get a lot of snow and the hills to be climbed are increadably steep. That's where the tires make the difference. I know in Minn. there is a strange lack of hills. Just try climbing a 20% grade on packed snow. I make my bread by commuting in this and it's not about going fast. Done it with all season radials (almost) and done it with top notch (hakkapilliita) snow tires and there's no comparison. Serious snow commuting demands good snow tires. Yes, you stop better too. And in my proffession (hospital work) it's not a matter of maybe getting there. You gotta be there.