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Old 06-19-2004, 09:40 PM   #1
Einstein
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Valve Adjustment with pictures!

Tomorrow I will be adjusting my valves.

Today I took thing apart per the Helm manual.

Preparations Steps:

1. Turn steering wheel all the way to the right.

2. Remove intake manifold cover two 10mm bolts

3. Remove ignition coil cover four 10mm nuts

4. Remove ignition coils four 10mm nuts and four connectors.

5. Remove 2 10mm bolts securing vacuum lines on the right of the valve cover

6. Remove 1 10mm bolt securing P/S hose bracket on the back left of the valve cover

7. Move P/S hose to the left and the ignition harness to the back.

8. Remove the dipstick

9. Remove the breather hose on the right of the valve cover with pliers on the bracket and pull off nipple.

10. Remove 6 10mm nuts and washers from cylinder head cover.

11. Lift head cover straight up to take off.

12. Put 19mm ratchet on crankshaft bolt.

Here's pictues of what the result looks like:





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Old 06-19-2004, 10:13 PM   #2
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>Tomorrow I will be adjusting my valves.



How come? 30K under the severe schedule. You have 30K already? And you drive it that hard?

For the non-techies here - valve adjustment normally comes at 110,000 miles.

(Doesn't look too bad, frankly. Let us know what you find on the starting clearances. I'm surprised that they don't remove the sparkplugs in the book procedure - makes turning the crank so much easier... and you're replacing the plugs anyway!)
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Old 06-20-2004, 06:47 AM   #3
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Well this is an "after break-in embellishment". That's right I'm only at 10,000 miles and I didn't misread the book.

I like to set all the valves to "perfect", I adjusted the valves on my S2000 at 6,000 miles and the engine idled much better. I also like to be more precise than they may have been set at the factory. It only took me about 20 minutes to disassemble the valve cover. It won't take me long to adjust the valves. Plus I'm doing it to see what the valvetrain looks like. ;)

There are people with Gen1 CR-V's who had burnt exhaust valves for waiting to adjust their valves until 105,000 miles. I agree that 30,000 miles is reasonable for most people who want to do it early and not risk damage from waiting until 110,000 miles.

I'll report the actual settings of the valves later in the day and let you guys decide whether or not it was worthwhile. Just checking it is worthwhile to me cuz it doesn't take me long.

Here are some more pictures, first of the cam gears at #1 TDC, and second the place where the valves are adjusted.



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Old 06-20-2004, 06:51 AM   #4
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Actually, this is the first time I ever adjusted valves without removing the spark plugs... I was afraid it would be too hard to turn, too. But it's easy if you take it slow.

P.S. our S2000's had a TSB for loose spark plugs, I also want to check that all the spark plugs are at least at up to the torque settings in the book. This is another one of those confidence-inspiring actions this Mechanical Engineer wants to do
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Old 06-20-2004, 09:28 AM   #5
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Turning the crankshaft clockwise wasn't too bad. You turn it some and let the compression subside--you can hear a whistle it sneak past the rings. Then turn some more. When you get close to TDC on each cylinder it gets suddenly easy to turn, expect to have to turn back CCW a few degrees to get it exactly where it's supposed to be.

As for where I found the clearances, I'll report the largest feeler gage I could get between the tappet and valve without shoving:

#1 Int .008, .008; Exh .010, .011
#2 Int .009, .009; Exh .011, .011
#3 Int .010, .010; Exh .010, .011
#4 Int .009, .009; Exh .012, .011

The specification is:
Int .008-.010; Exh .011-.013.

When I was done adjusting, the settings were this:

#1 Int .009, .009; Exh .012, .012
#2 Int .009, .009; Exh .012, .012
#3 Int .009, .009; Exh .012, .012
#4 Int .009, .009; Exh .012, .012

I made sure a .010 and .013 would not go through.

Notice that I adjusted 11 of 16 valves, 9 of which were tight compared to the center of the specification, 2 were tight enough to be slightly out of specification.

One thing I don't know is whether or not (for the Element) valves get loose over time or tight over time. My experience between adjustments is that they can go either way. You don't have to worry too much about them getting loose, but tight valves can be very damaging because the valves are open when they shouldn't be.

I also checked the spark plug torque. All passed 18 N*m.

Putting things back together was more time consuming than taking them apart. Notably the valve cover was hard to get past all the stiff hoses which constantly tried to get in the way. But otherwise using a torque wrench and making sure everything was clean:

1. Clean valve cover seating surface and rubber gasket with non-chlorinated brake parts cleaner.

2. Apply Hondabond HT to four locations, two corners and timing chain cover interface with the head.

3. Remove washers and gaskets from 6 locations on the valve cover.

4. Put valve cover back on, carefully making sure you're not crushing anything (use a mirror) and that the spark plug seals are properly seating.

5. Put the gaskets and washers and nuts on the studs. Tighten in steps per the torque sequence in the Helm manual to 12 N*m.

6. Optional: Check spark plug torque to 18 N*m.

7. Install dipstick.

8. Replace breather hose.

9. Reinstall P/S hose bracket, torque the bolt to 12 N*m.

10. Reinstall vacuum line bracket, torque the two bolts to 12 N*m.

11. Replace ignition coils, torque the four bolts to 12 N*m.

12. Replace the spark plug cover, torque the four bolts/nuts to 9.8 N*m.

13. Replace the intake manifold cover, torque the two bolts to 12 N*m.

14. Wait at least 30 minutes before driving so the Hondabond HT can fully cure. Spend the time accounting for all your tools, checking over your work.

All together it took me 3 hours.

Based on what I experienced, I would definitely recommend having a valve adjustment done by 30,000 miles.
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Old 06-20-2004, 11:47 AM   #6
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After a test drive, the car idles and runs about the same as it did before the adjustment.

I found it interesting that the two exhaust valves run off of one camshaft lobe. The rocker arm is one solid piece (which required a lower torque spec when adjusting valves, 14 N*m instead of 20 N*m). For all the DOHC Hondas in recent memory the exhaust valves have their own cam lobe. Maybe it's a cost-saving measure? Maybe with roller cam followers the friction is low enough that one cam lobe is sufficient?

VTEC only runs off the intake valves. There is a huge difference between the two intake cam profiles. All rocker arms work all the time, instead of the usual DOHC VTEC which requires a lost motion spring for the high RPM rocker arm. Instead, there are only two rocker arms instead of the 3 used for the S2000 engine. In the Element, one valve always opens more than the other at low RPM, which promotes swirl. At high RPM, they lock together and both intake valves run off of the wild cam (instead of just one). Then the "i" part of the iVTEC works off the front cam pulley, notice how it's different than the one behind it. The actual cam dwell of the intake valve operates off computer control, while the exhaust valve cam dwell is fixed.

You'll also see the timing chain. I know some less-read people wonder if the Element has a chain or belt. See, it's a chain :)
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Old 06-20-2004, 11:51 AM   #7
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Now if it was me, I would have left the intakes alone since all were within tolerances (I know, you have it opened-up anyway).

However, that's very interesting on the exhausts... two were tight out of spec, with the rest 'cept one at the bottom of the tolerance range. What we need to know (but can't know) is what they were from the factory. If this is - at all - an indication that the trend is for the exhaust valves to tighten-up, then a 30K interval is perfectly reasonable even under normal service. I'm making mental note that it's going to need this at 30.

That compression behavior is exactly what you're supposed to get when hand-cranking. I've been lazy at times while chasing valve clatter and didn't bother with the plugs. Not to mention that one car I had which needed fairly frequent valve adjusts was a V8 with the front bank of plugs inaccessable without other disassembly.

Did you buy the special tool that's mentioned in the manual? Those look like every other Japanese design I've done the valves on - a box-end wrench and clean, sharp screwdriver are just fine.

(Oooooh... are my eyes deceiving me? Roller tappets? Way cool!)
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Old 06-20-2004, 07:02 PM   #8
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By putting the valves right on spec, I'm able to go to 110,000 miles with more confidence, if I really want to.

---

No special tool, just a flat blade screwdriver and a 10mm socket is all that's needed on the end of your standard and torque wrenches.

The nice thing about Honda tappets these days is that the adjuster doesn't turn with the nut while tightening the nut. This makes a tool I bought some time ago for my Integra GS-R obsolete.

[quote:b02f8c4e71=" "]
Now if it was me, I would have left the intakes alone since all were within tolerances (I know, you have it opened-up anyway).
---
Did you buy the special tool that's mentioned in the manual? Those look like every other Japanese design I've done the valves on - a box-end wrench and clean, sharp screwdriver are just fine.
[/quote:b02f8c4e71]
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Old 06-21-2004, 06:16 PM   #9
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Here's a list of the things I needed to do the job:

Helm shop manual
2- 3/8" Ratchets
10mm and 19mm sockets
10mm crescent wrench
3" and 6" extensions for 3/8" drive
Pliers (for breather hose)
Flat screwdriver
Torque wrench good up to 20 N*m
Handheld Mirror
Non-chlorinated brake cleaner
Hondabond HT or equivalent non-silicone gasket sealant
5/8" spark plug socket (to check the installation torque, didn't need to take them out)
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Old 07-11-2004, 06:13 PM   #10
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The only iVTEC engines with VTEC on the exhaust is the RSX type-s and the TSX. All others are only on the intake.
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