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I was such a fan of his movies.

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'80s teen flick director John Hughes dies in NYC
Aug. 6, 2009, 4:08 PM EST

NEW YORK (AP) -- Writer-director John Hughes, Hollywood's youth impresario of the 1980s and '90s who captured and cornered the teen and pre-teen market with such favorites as "Home Alone," "The Breakfast Club" and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off," died Thursday, a spokeswoman said. He was 59.

Hughes died of a heart attack during a morning walk in Manhattan, Michelle Bega said. He was in New York to visit family.

A native of Lansing, Mich., who later moved to suburban Chicago and set much of his work there, Hughes rose from ad writer to comedy writer to silver screen champ with his affectionate and idealized portraits of teens, whether the romantic and sexual insecurity of "Sixteen Candles," or the J.D. Salinger-esque rebellion against conformity in "The Breakfast Club."

Hughes' ensemble comedies helped make stars out of Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall, Ally Sheedy and many other young performers. He also scripted the phenomenally popular "Home Alone," which made little-known Macaulay Culkin a sensation as the 8-year-old accidentally abandoned by his vacationing family, and wrote or directed such hits as "National Lampoon's Vacation," "Pretty in Pink," "Planes, Trains & Automobiles" and "Uncle Buck."

Other actors who got early breaks from Hughes included John Cusack ("Sixteen Candles"), Judd Nelson ("The Breakfast Club"), Steve Carrell ("Curly Sue") and Lili Taylor ("She's Having a Baby").

As Hughes advanced into middle age, his commercial touch faded and, in Salinger style, he increasingly withdrew from public life. His last directing credit was in 1991, for "Curly Sue," and he wrote just a handful of scripts over the past decade. He was rarely interviewed or photographed.

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Associated Press writer Amy Westfeldt contributed to this report.
 

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I loved his movies
Buller
 

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"Oh, he's very popular Ed. The sportos, the motorheads, geeks, sluts, bloods, waistoids, dweebies, dic kheads - they all adore him. They think he's a righteous dude. "

If I had a buck for every line of one of his movies I have stuck in my head. He and Cameron Crowe have to be the best two chroniclers of youth on film in the last 3 decades.
 

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(sniffing the white out) I know what you mean
 

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Dear Mr. Vernon, we accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it was we did wrong. But we think you're crazy to make an essay telling you who we think we are. You see us as you want to see us... In the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions. But what we found out is that each one of us is a brain...
...and an athlete...
...and a basket case...
...a princess...
...and a criminal...
Does that answer your question?... Sincerely yours, the Breakfast Club.

A LOT of people came to learn that there really beyond the surface of those we passed in our high school halls... All thanks to Mr. Hughes.

He also brought our attention to some really great music. (Fade out to "Don't You [Forget About Me]" by Simple Minds)
 

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He was also one to paint Chicago in a very good light. Many of his movies took place in the City or northern suburbs. I can show you the exact place the Ferrari went airborn in Ferris Bueler's. Anyhow, after numberous mobster movies and batman movies where chicago looks like a crime ridden filthtopolis his movies make Chicagoans puff out their chest a little.

RIP.
 
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