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A true performance chip will run you $150 - $200 and will have a manufacturers name on them. These are cheezy diodes that will bypass important programs in your computer to allow you to advance the timing and such. They will also void your warranty and kill your motor.
 

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It's junk. There's also nothing custom to the Element about it.

This trick has been around ever since they started putting computer-controlled engines in cars. It's nothing more than a resistor that you splice into the incoming air temperature sensor to make the computer think that it's cold, therefore increasing the amount of fuel metered to the engine. It essentially runs your engine "rich" all the time. It'll juice some cars a little bit, but does nothing for most cars and can potentially put your fuel economy into the dumper.

FWIW, I am very, very, very wary of "performance enhancements" that show-up on eBay and nowhere else. The hype alone has that "snake oil" feel to it, doesn't it?
 

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Hey, Dan - even the "legit" performance chips run the risk of voiding the warranty. I know that Ford was making a big stink early last year when they were on a cost-cutting campaign - vehicles with a major engine warranty claim got a little visit from a "warranty auditor". If the engine was chipped - or there was even any evidence that it may have been chipped (worn screwheads, etc.), the claim was rejected.

Obviously we don't know if Honda has the same problem, but I wouldn't chip an engine unless the company had been around for a while and had the legal staff to back me up if it came to mano a mano with Honda.

:roll:
 

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Mike, you're probably absolutely correct. The only vehicle I ever "chipped" was a '84 Camaro, but then it had a 383 stroker and was about 10 years past warranty anyway. But damn, that car went like a raped ape.
 

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That entire concept is twisted. Adding a chip does not increase timing. A person has to manually change their timing with hand tools. All this chip does is change your fuel delivery. It probably makes your engine run rich as hell. It's a great upgrade if you want crappy gas mileage, and burnt piston rings.
 

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[quote:e4a22f0cac="hedgeborn"]A chip on a naturally aspirated engine is going to do little or NOTHING. Period.

Save your money.[/quote:e4a22f0cac]

Actually, this is not a true statement. A properly programmed replacement chip will definitely make a noticeable difference in the way a n/a engine performs.

First hand experience for me is my '91 Chevy S-10, 4.3L V6. Put in the strip level chip, changed thermostat to 160. It had been my father's truck, and he noticed the difference right off the bat. After adding Flowmaster cat-back duals and a B&M shift kit, it was at peak.

A factory chip is programmed to think of economy & mileage first. The "strip" level chip I installed was progrmmed to think of "let's get frickin' going NOW" first. Throttle response was drastically improved. Large grades at highway speed no longer required downshifts to maintain speed.

And, much to my father's disbelief, mileage DID NOT go down. Admittedly, his driving in El Paso was strictly neighborhood streets, all stop and go. My driving in Dallas is mixed city/freeway driving, but still plenty of stop and go. The fairest comparison was open road driving between Dallas and El Paso. The S-10 managed 3-4 mpg better on the open road while "chipped" than it ever did stock.

Fly by night, unheard of companies? Wouldn't touch their stuff. Reputable, been there a long time companies? Their products work. Period.
 

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[quote:35f53f2783="MatT3T4"]That entire concept is twisted. Adding a chip does not increase timing. A person has to manually change their timing with hand tools. All this chip does is change your fuel delivery. It probably makes your engine run rich as hell. It's a great upgrade if you want crappy gas mileage, and burnt piston rings.[/quote:35f53f2783]

I politely disagree. What hand tools are going to change the timing on a distributorless, multi-coil mill?

Let me expound on the above statement. In the old days, with my '77 Cutlass or '79 Olds 98, I would set the baseline timing. That baseline is then hardcoded, so to speak, unless something slips or breaks. But, while the engine performs, the timing varies all over the place due to the vacuum advance (for part throttle variation) and the mechanical advance (for higher rpm wot variation). So, at any given engine rpm, load and throttle application, the timing is varied to meet demand. I drastically altered the performace curves on these engines by going to Moroso and Crane for adjustable vacuum advance and performance weights and springs for the mechanical advance.

I submit that on the modern computer controlled vehicle, these same variations occur, but they are controlled by the computer vs. mechanical items. Installing a properly programmed chip is the modern way to change what was known as the vacuum (load) and mechanical (rpm) advance curves.

My experience with installing and using a properly programmed chip is far different than your claim. My claim is from direct personal experience, not a "probably."
 

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bottom line there is no chip for a honda and there has never been one for any honda the only computer mod that works is done by actually removing the factory ecm and reprogramming it. there are a few companies that do it but my best experience has been with JET they send you a prepaid fedex box and instructions how to remove the ecm you then send your ecm to them they reprogram it and send it back,,, so you are with out your E for about two weeks! all for an increase of 10 to 25 hp wow! I know becuase a manage a 4x4 accessory shop and sell all types of performance chips from hypertech to diablos to superchip and jet and when I got my E I contacted all the manufactures to find out who had what!
 

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[quote:55d931d17e="medic4lee"]all for an increase of 10 to 25 hp wow! [/quote:55d931d17e]

10-25hp on a 160hp engine is DAMN significant. Jesus Christ and General Jackson, what do you guys expect out of a little overburdened 4-banger? :roll:
 

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Show me proof of a chip alone that produces 25 extra horsepower in a naturally aspirated 4 cylinder.

10 horsepower, not across the board, but only at the peak RPM, I can belieive, but even then, don't expect the results to be cumulative. In other words, you aren't going to put on that chip, add a CAI that advertises 10-15 hp, an exhaust that advertises 10 hp and have a 195 hp Element. Sorry.

The truth is that there are not that many variables you can adjust to get more power from a modern engine like this. They are already pretty much optimized. We are not talking about 1960's big block mills here. You can't apply the same rules. Completely different ball of wax.

I would not call the K24 in the Element overburdened though. Honda gets 200 hp from this engine with VTEC trickery, higher compression and a different head in the TSX. Those are real modifications though. :wink:

Go buy some engine parts from a wrecked TSX and work them onto your K24, then you will get some gains worthy of respect.

Then bolt on a turbo. :twisted:
 

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If you are thinking of buying a chip or a CAI for your Element, just get some Type R stickers instead, turn off your overdrive on your automatic transmission and drive around making "VRROOOM VROOM" noises with your head out the window.

You'll get more performance that way and save $200.
 

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[quote:1b32f2c4fe="hedgeborn"]If you are thinking of buying a chip or a CAI for your Element, just get some Type R stickers instead, turn off your overdrive on your automatic transmission and drive around making "VRROOOM VROOM" noises with your head out the window.

You'll get more performance that way and save $200.[/quote:1b32f2c4fe]

Damn, you oughta be on the stage at the Comedy Club! :roll:
 

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I agree! You just gotta make sure you can make those noises loud enough to be heard over the sound of the $2,500 aftermarket stereo system! :wink:
 

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I politely disagree. What hand tools are going to change the timing on a distributorless, multi-coil mill?

Let me expound on the above statement. In the old days, with my '77 Cutlass or '79 Olds 98, I would set the baseline timing. That baseline is then hardcoded, so to speak, unless something slips or breaks. But, while the engine performs, the timing varies all over the place due to the vacuum advance (for part throttle variation) and the mechanical advance (for higher rpm wot variation). So, at any given engine rpm, load and throttle application, the timing is varied to meet demand. I drastically altered the performace curves on these engines by going to Moroso and Crane for adjustable vacuum advance and performance weights and springs for the mechanical advance.

I submit that on the modern computer controlled vehicle, these same variations occur, but they are controlled by the computer vs. mechanical items. Installing a properly programmed chip is the modern way to change what was known as the vacuum (load) and mechanical (rpm) advance curves.

My experience with installing and using a properly programmed chip is far different than your claim. My claim is from direct personal experience, not a "probably."
You kinda lost me here. Distributorless? I've been tuning B-series Honda engines for years, and we always use the distributor to change the timing, especially on forced induction motors. I really haven't jumped into a K-series yet, but distributorless? Please explain, because I'm really confused. You have to remember, too, that on a Honda engine, the gains seen from a chip, especiall on a stock engine, will be FAR less than you would see on an NA 4.3L V6.
 

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You kinda lost me here. Distributorless? I've been tuning B-series Honda engines for years, and we always use the distributor to change the timing, especially on forced induction motors. I really haven't jumped into a K-series yet, but distributorless? Please explain, because I'm really confused. You have to remember, too, that on a Honda engine, the gains seen from a chip, especiall on a stock engine, will be FAR less than you would see on an NA 4.3L V6.
The Element, just like my 2002 Si, does not have a distributor, and each plug has an individual coil. This type of set up has been around a long time - my 1988 Olds Cierra with the 3800 multi-port FI V-6 did not have a distributor either, just multiple coil packs controlled by the computer.

The point I'm trying to get across to everyone is that GAINS are GAINS. Yes, a bigger motor might see more gains if you just look at HP numbers. Figure those gains as a percentage, and I really don't think you will find too much of a gap. Whether it's built by Honda, or by BMW or by GM, they are all internal combustion engines that share immutable characteristics.

1). They intake air. Make the intake of said air more efficient in any way, and the engine expends less power trying to breathe in.
2). They exhaust "spent" air. Remove some of the restrictions put in place by the manufacturer's desire to keep the vehicle as quiet as possible, and the engine is expending less power to vent the exhaust gasses.
3). Add 1 & 2 together, and there is a cumulative effect.

This was true for my old '79 Olds 98 Regency that had a 403 V8, it was true for the S-10 with the 4.3 V6, it was true for the '99 Si with the itsy-bitsy 1.6 I4, it was true for the '02 Si with a 2.0 I4, and it's true for the Element with the 2.4 I4. And, it was true on all of the other vehicles that preceeded the ones listed above. Parts is parts.

My logic does not expect mild mods to suddenly produce 100+ HP out of a 4-banger. My logic does expect that there will be a generally comparable percentage increase of drivable power, just like there has been on every car I've owned (they ALL get some engine mods).
 

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no..i will not get those chips..
as it will void the factory..besides..
only a chip will not do any improvment
it only alter your computer program..
u've got to have some hardware to improve horsepower..
2.4 Liter 160HP DOHC VTEC .satisfies me already..
cause i have a more powerful machine :lol:
 

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Cold Air Intake Sensor Mod Chip

Has anyone out there tried this kind of Sensor ?
Here are the details :

This simple, yet effective modification will allow you to boost the power output of your vehicle's engine without sacrificing reliability or comfort. It consists of a small electronic device that will be inserted between one of your car's sensor and the ECU. This is also know as a "piggy back" device as it is external to the main processing unit (the ECU). You will feel the gain instantly with no expensive tuning necessary.

It is supposed to add between 13 and 22 hp. and it only costs $ 4.99
plus $ 4.00 ship. It is listed on Ebay under Element parts.

I wonder if this is safe to use since it has to be connected to the ECU.

Thanks for any comments
 
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