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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Please excuse the pun, but a continuing pet peeve of mine is the anti-dog policies of some state's campground systems. I'm privileged to live adjacent to probably the dog-friendliest and best overall state park system in America: Virginia's.

I'm frustrated to also live adjacent to what was one of the most anti-dog states and now is possibly the most convoluted and complex in terms of when and where dogs are allowed: Maryland.

http://www.dnr.state.md.us/publiclands/pdfs/MPS Pet Policy - FINAL - Effective April 9 2010.pdf

West Virginia allows dogs in campgrounds and is also now allowing dogs in designated cabins. Bravo, West Virginia!!

I urge fellow EOC-ers who feel as I do to speak up against state campground policies that prohibit or so severely restrict dogs.

And as important, compliment those state park systems that are dog-friendly.

Dog-people tend to be outdoors-people. Thanks to the dog-friendly Commonwealth of Virginia, I got back into camping nearly 20 years ago with my first Samoyed, Buck.

Below is an e-mail I just sent to the Maryland state park system via their customer service e-mail:


"It's good to see that the state of Maryland is at long last making some effort to be dog-friendly. But you all have a long way to go.

I was just about to book a mid-week reservation for Cunningham Falls until I saw that the remaining anti-dog stipulations include not being allowed in the lake during the summer. Why did Maryland have to make the dog policy so complicated and restrictive?

Just look across the Potomac to Virginia -- the dog-friendliest state park system in America. Simple and friendly. Dogs are allowed in campgrounds and cabins, for a fee, period. And dogs are allowed in the lakes and rivers, year-around.

I live in DC and would just as soon explore Maryland but the anti-dog policies keep pushing me away and to Virginia. I'm a single woman who loves to camp but am not doing so without my dog.

Virginia is for dog lovers. Maryland is for people who satisfy the fine print. Such a shame."

:)
 

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That's a shame, I wonder if they have an studies about how many outdoor enthusiasts go to another state because they can't bring their pups with them, I'll wager there's quite a bit of lost revenue there. Probably shock them into changing a few rules.
Even though my wife and I don't have a pup of our own (my allergies), it's nice to hit a park and see some dogs kicking back enjoying some outdoor time with their families.

Good Luck and Great Camping to you and Gidget, HC.
 

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California State Parks and all of the National Parks have tight restrictions for dogs on hiking trails and leash restrictions at all of it's campgrounds.

Restrictions have always been a problem for folks with dogs in the campgrounds.
I think the restrictions are there mostly to protect other campers from the idiot dog owners who have dogs that aren't very well trained (if at all) and who don't socialize well with others.

At one camping excursion I went on... some fools let their two large dogs loose and they began terrorising the campground early one morning.
They attacked several dogs that were leashed causing a major ruckus and that started a heated argument between the owners that got quiet ugly.

On all of our EOC camping binges we have lotza dogs on hand and they handle the 6 ft leash restrictions OK but you can tell the dogs aren't very happy bout having to be tied to a short leash.

This year we're heading to Northern California to camp in the Redwoods.
And there will be more dogs on hand for this camping trip than we've every had before. (at last count we're up to "!0" dogs )

Lucky for us we found a great "private campground" in the heart of the Redwoods to stay at that is very dog friendly.
The campground has 33 acres of perimeter camp to allow dogs to run off leash! :eek:die:
We lucked out when we found this place. Our dogs will be happy and we'll all have a great time!
http://www.kampklamath.com/pets.html
 

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In Washington, BC, and Oregon prohibit dogs from swim beaches and park buildings. BC parks also prohibit them from day use picnic and play areas. On the other hand, some have 'dog beaches'. Small town parks often prohibit dogs. I think these restrictions are based on concern children will come in contact with dog poop.

The trail restriction in National Parks means that I've cut back my visits to those parks since getting my dog. Instead I focus on nearby National Forest, or National Rec Areas (also administered by the park service). I believe the trail restrictions are based on concern over dogs harassing wildlife.
 

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"Maryland is for people who satisfy the fine print.

Love that line, Hiker Chick!! I'm headed west for a couple months of camping and will report on anti-dog campgrounds (or dog friendly ones).
Ridgeback Mobile
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
California State Parks and all of the National Parks have tight restrictions for dogs on hiking trails and leash restrictions at all of it's campgrounds.

]http://www.kampklamath.com/pets.html[/URL]
Some trail restrictions are understandable but the NPS goes too far in too many of its parks. Certainly leash laws are a good thing, especially for the dogs.

The anti-dog posture in some states back east has been so extreme as to entirely prohibit dogs in campgrounds, period. I wrote a letter to the Pennsylvania State Parks in the early 90s to inform them that they'd lost my business because they did not allow dogs in state parks (I think they've loosened up some since then, but not entirely).

Prohibitions on dogs in campgrounds is extreme, outrageous and ignorant (and evidently waning). Fortunately, eastern states are smaller than out west so there are accessible dog-friendly states. New York, the biggest state back here is fortunately very dog-friendly and has been as long as I've been looking into camping there.

As you all know, I've camped a good deal. Over 100 nights in just the past few years. In campgrounds heavily populated by dogs.

I have never -- ever -- been awakened by a dog (Harley's coming into camp after midnight are another story). And dogs have never been a nuisance (RV generators are) or a problem (they deter bears and two-legged predators).

ADDENDUM -- I just booked five nights at my favorite Virginia State Park. Can hardly wait -- beautiful lake, lakeside campground and DOG-FRIENDLY.

Gidget will be getting lots of time in our inflatable canoe. And like the Queen of the Nile, she will be paddled around. She no doubt thinks that is an appropriate use for humans.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's a shame, I wonder if they have an studies about how many outdoor enthusiasts go to another state because they can't bring their pups with them, I'll wager there's quite a bit of lost revenue there. Probably shock them into changing a few rules.
Even though my wife and I don't have a pup of our own (my allergies), it's nice to hit a park and see some dogs kicking back enjoying some outdoor time with their families.

Good Luck and Great Camping to you and Gidget, HC.
Thanks, Protag. I think you're right about lost revenue. Probably explains why New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland have recently begun to become at least somewhat dog-friendly. But when there are all these restrictions such as Maryland has that requires a multi-page chart to wade through, I'll not bother when there are dog-friendlier options (Virginia and West Virginia).

I darn near booked that Maryland park. Would have been mighty ticked to get there and find out we couldn't go out on the lake.


:)
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
The trail restriction in National Parks means that I've cut back my visits to those parks since getting my dog. Instead I focus on nearby National Forest, or National Rec Areas (also administered by the park service). I believe the trail restrictions are based on concern over dogs harassing wildlife.

After a summer hiking at Mt. Hood with Gidget and other dogs I was highly annoyed to arrive at Mt. Rainier and get the anti-dog rendition at the entrance booth. The only difference between Hood and Rainier hiking terrain being jurisdictional -- NPS vs. National Forest.

I knew going there that dogs are severely restricted but the contrast between Hood and Rainier made me contact someone in Congress about legislation. Among my thoughts is that the NPS in parks like Rainier should issue permits - with strict guidelines - to people who want to take their dogs and charge a fee (revenue enhancement - yay).

The high-impact argument against dogs that I've heard of strikes me as bogus. Their paws are far lower-impact than lug-soled boots and hiking poles. And I fail to see how their poop is more of a contamination than what human hikers don't pack out (an issue in the restricted areas of St. Helens).

Protecting wildlife -- yeah, from off-leash dogs. Leashed dogs should not be a problem. I'd bet that cars kill more wildlife in national parks than dogs ever would. Shenandoah NP is exceptionally dog-friendly, allowing them on nearly all the trails and all of the AT. The only trails they aren't allowed on are the easy trails popular with the Winnebego set. The threat to wildlife in SNP is far more human poachers than pups.

 

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Please excuse the pun, but a continuing pet peeve of mine is the anti-dog policies of some state's campground systems. I'm privileged to live adjacent to probably the dog-friendliest and best overall state park system in America: Virginia's.

I'm frustrated to also live adjacent to what was one of the most anti-dog states and now is possibly the most convoluted and complex in terms of when and where dogs are allowed: Maryland.

http://www.dnr.state.md.us/publiclands/pdfs/MPS Pet Policy - FINAL - Effective April 9 2010.pdf

West Virginia allows dogs in campgrounds and is also now allowing dogs in designated cabins. Bravo, West Virginia!!

I urge fellow EOC-ers who feel as I do to speak up against state campground policies that prohibit or so severely restrict dogs.

And as important, compliment those state park systems that are dog-friendly.

Dog-people tend to be outdoors-people. Thanks to the dog-friendly Commonwealth of Virginia, I got back into camping nearly 20 years ago with my first Samoyed, Buck.

Below is an e-mail I just sent to the Maryland state park system via their customer service e-mail:


"It's good to see that the state of Maryland is at long last making some effort to be dog-friendly. But you all have a long way to go.

I was just about to book a mid-week reservation for Cunningham Falls until I saw that the remaining anti-dog stipulations include not being allowed in the lake during the summer. Why did Maryland have to make the dog policy so complicated and restrictive?

Just look across the Potomac to Virginia -- the dog-friendliest state park system in America. Simple and friendly. Dogs are allowed in campgrounds and cabins, for a fee, period. And dogs are allowed in the lakes and rivers, year-around.

I live in DC and would just as soon explore Maryland but the anti-dog policies keep pushing me away and to Virginia. I'm a single woman who loves to camp but am not doing so without my dog.

Virginia is for dog lovers. Maryland is for people who satisfy the fine print. Such a shame."

:)
And what's this got to do with a Honda Element?

I love dogs, believe me. I have 2 beautiful labs.

But leave the pooches at home when you go camping or on trips. Make a reservation in the dog kennel, and leave them at home when you head out on a trip for camping. I'm all for the anti-dog rules at campgrounds, motels/hotels, etc... .

This thread has nothing to do with Elements...:evil:
 

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And what's this got to do with a Honda Element?
This thread has nothing to do with Elements...:evil:
Um-LeadFoot- did you notice this thread is posted in Bikin'Campin and Kayakn'?

Things people with ELEMENTS and DOGS like to do- so if parks don't allow dogs- they also exclude a large number of Element owners-get the connection?

Go pet you gerbil:lol:
 

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I love dogs, believe me. I have 2 beautiful labs.

But leave the pooches at home when you go camping or on trips. Make a reservation in the dog kennel, and leave them at home when you head out on a trip for camping. I'm all for the anti-dog rules at campgrounds, motels/hotels, etc... .

This thread has nothing to do with Elements...:evil:
I don't know how you define "I love dogs" but putting them in a kennel certainly doesn't define love to me. The sole reason I bought an Element was so that we had a dog friendly vehicle to enable us to have our dogs travel with us. That's how this thread relates to Elements! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
And what's this got to do with a Honda Element?

I love dogs, believe me. I have 2 beautiful labs.

But leave the pooches at home when you go camping or on trips. Make a reservation in the dog kennel, and leave them at home when you head out on a trip for camping. I'm all for the anti-dog rules at campgrounds, motels/hotels, etc... .

This thread has nothing to do with Elements...:evil:


Too bad for your labs that they are left behind whenever you go on vacation.

Do you ever go camping?

You do illustrate why those of us who support dog-friendly destinations need to speak out in favor of them.


:)
 

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I don't know how you define "I love dogs" but putting them in a kennel certainly doesn't define love to me. The sole reason I bought an Element was so that we had a dog friendly vehicle to enable us to have our dogs travel with us. That's how this thread relates to Elements! :)
Not to worry, they go to a "luxury kennel" on 180 acre spread. They love it there (it's also where they were bred).

I just think the hassle of dealing with all of the restrictions at a campground make both pets and owners miserable to the point they are better off left at home.

The rules of the campground should first, and foremost, protect the rights of the campers and park users - not the pets. Everyone thinks their own pet is the best and won't cause any problems. However, the rules have been established because in reality - problems arise as animals are not as predictable as any of us would like them to be. Sure, your pet may be well trained, and under your guidance would follow all the rules perfectly without any problems. But there are plenty that won't be able to do that.

You have to think of the rights of all the campers and why the rules were established in the first place.

I am......the LeadFoot
 

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Too bad for your labs that they are left behind whenever you go on vacation.

Do you ever go camping?

You do illustrate why those of us who support dog-friendly destinations need to speak out in favor of them.


:)
Why is it too bad that my dogs stay at home when my family travels? There have been plenty of times we bring them along, but a family of 4 in a vehicle along with 2 large Labs is a much different experience than a single lady with her one pet dog traveling in a vehicle.

Not to mention the actual camping experience of entertaining and taking care of 2 children along with 2 large dogs ends up being not as relaxing as intended. Yes, I go camping. Been doing so for over 40 years.
 

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Wow Hiker, I had no idea about a majority of these policies...thankfully I live in VA and will more than likely be camping out west throughout the summer. Doesn't really surprise me with Maryland though...:lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Why is it too bad that my dogs stay at home when my family travels? There have been plenty of times we bring them along, but a family of 4 in a vehicle along with 2 large Labs is a much different experience than a single lady with her one pet dog traveling in a vehicle.

Not to mention the actual camping experience of entertaining and taking care of 2 children along with 2 large dogs ends up being not as relaxing as intended. Yes, I go camping. Been doing so for over 40 years.
My family always took our dogs on our camp trips. Three kids, two dogs (labs).

Different strokes. Your experiences haven't been mine, my experiences aren't your's.

I would imagine that supervising two children and two dogs in a campground would often be hectic. I haven't given my mother, in particular, enough credit.

 

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Discussion Starter #19
I just think the hassle of dealing with all of the restrictions at a campground make both pets and owners miserable to the point they are better off left at home.
Again, your experience, not mine. And not the experience of any dog owners who I have camped with.

My dog never seems happier than when she's camping. I'd venture to say she likes camping better than Greenies.

Well, that last part is presumptuous. She likes Greenies a lot.


:)


 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Wow Hiker, I had no idea about a majority of these policies...thankfully I live in VA and will more than likely be camping out west throughout the summer. Doesn't really surprise me with Maryland though...:lol:
Do you have a list of campgrounds you plan on visiting? Or are you going to wing it? I tend to be a slave to reservations.

All the national parks that I'm aware of allow dogs in the campgrounds and paved areas (overlooks, parking lots). From there it varies. Some national parks have one or a few shorter trails that dogs are allowed on. Individual park superintendents have discretion on that.

Shenandoah NP and Acadia NP may be the dog-friendliest in the entire system. Perhaps because they did not start out as wilderness areas. Shenandoah was reclaimed (via eminent domain) from private citizens who had lived off the land and decimated the wildlife. Acadia is a dog-friendly place to visit -- 100 miles of dog-friendly trails and 50 miles of dog-friendly "carriage roads" (no cars allowed, nice switch). Acadia is also popular for dog sledding and skijoring. The carriage roads are outstanding for bikejoring-dogscootering. Did 30 miles of them with Gidget. Love that place!

So have you discussed your summer trip in another thread? What's your plan?

:)
 
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