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Discussion Starter #1
I understand there is the manufacturer's maintenance schedule and there might be a best practice maintenance schedule (based on people's experience and expertise).....

So I would like to start a thread here, that will be moderated by peers and hopefully become a sticky....so any E owners wanting to maintain their E's in great condition will have a source....

Thanks
h.
 

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Okay, I'll start.

My E gets fairly heavy use in the wintertime, long climbs and descents, cold starts and lots of use of the AWD.

I would recommend more frequent fluid changes than recommended - particularly rear diff, transmission, radiator and brake fluids. All mine were changed before 50,000 km.
 

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* brakes should be "serviced" every year or 20k miles. I recomend Springtime for areas where salt/de-icer is used in the winter. Do the fluid replacement every 2-3 years or when pads are replaced....I tie this in with the above mentioned brake service when it is due

* Auto trans: every 25-30k miles simple fluid drain and refill. Replace the filter the first time, and maybe every other time after that.

* Manual trans: every 40k miles is fine

* Rear diff every 30k miles or so. Some like to do it a bit sooner. It is best to do it before it starts makeing noise.

* Coolant: every 3 years or 45K or so.

*Tire rotation: first time at 5k, then every 10k miles

*oil changes: I prefer 5k, but many use 10k miles with good results....i'd feel more comfortable recomending the 10k if I knew synthetic oil and a quality filter were used.

* valve check/adjustment: if you hear ticking....or around 60k miles. It might be a bit premature, but checking is fairly easy, and it is better than running into problems later on. 90k is ok if you're not as paranoid as me.

*engine & cabin airfilter: 25k miles , but if you drive in dusty areas, or areas with lots of air polution I'd do it sooner, or at least check more often.

*power steering fluid: drain as much of the old as possible and replace with new when the old stuff looks dirty.....around 50k for most people.




Or in other words.....about 1/2 of the interval that Honda says. :rolleyes:
 

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* brakes should be "serviced" every year or 20k miles. I recomend Springtime for areas where salt/de-icer is used in the winter. Do the fluid replacement every 2-3 years or when pads are replaced....I tie this in with the above mentioned brake service when it is due
What kind of brake "service" you are recommending here for every 20k?
Are you talking about replacing pads, inspection & replace/repair if needed, or any specific type of service you are recommending here for every 20K?

I am not a very heavy braking person. On my previous Toyota 4Runner, which I had it for more than 180k. My front brake pads last at least 50k+ miles each set, if not more. I actually normally would replaced front rotors at the same time when I replace my pads, instead of resurfacing them. This was needed due to 4Runner rotors are easily warped , & I like the new ones rather deal with resurfacing.
 

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What kind of brake "service" you are recommending here for every 20k?
Are you talking about replacing pads, inspection & replace/repair if needed, or any specific type of service you are recommending here for every 20K?
...
As was said, if you drive in a highly corrosive environment (salt on winter roads or near the ocean), cleaning and lubing calipers, sliders etc on your brakes frequently is a good investment. Doing this will save your pads, and particularly your rotors, from premature failure.
 

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What kind of brake "service" you are recommending here for every 20k?
Are you talking about replacing pads, inspection & replace/repair if needed, or any specific type of service you are recommending here for every 20K?
Yes, basicly an "inspection," that involves cleaning and lubrication. Not just looking at the pad w/o removing the caliper. It needs to come off and have everything looked at and checked for proper function. A search for "grinding brakes" will show why this is so important. :wink:
 

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Yes, basicly an "inspection," that involves cleaning and lubrication. Not just looking at the pad w/o removing the caliper. It needs to come off and have everything looked at and checked for proper function. A search for "grinding brakes" will show why this is so important. :wink:
Yep. I seen those "grinding brakes" thread before.
I never did clean or lube my 4Runner brake until the pads were worn off, then I clean & lube brake parts when I was replacing pads.
I never had any brake problem, other than warp rotors, on my 4Runner, & I know it is a common issue on 2nd gen 4Runner for warp rotors, mostly due to heavy weight & rear drum brakes, regardless cleaning or lubing before replace pads.
I guess I will need to do it differently & perform clean & lube for the E as intermediate service.:)
 

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I guess I will need to do it differently & perform clean & lube for the E as intermediate service.:)
Yup....different vehicles with different "needs." You don't have to do it....but I recomend it. There are plenty of people that just do "normal" pad replacement with little "service" and have little to no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
that is why this is called the best pratice thread....because its not required by the owners manual....but for someone wanting to keep it tip-top conditions.....
 

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My home computer went for a poop so I'm stuck with my iTouch when I'm at home here. I'll post tomorrow on my lunch break at work but basically I do the following:

-Oil changes every 5000kms
-ATF change every 20,000kms
-Tire rotation every 10,000kms
-Brake service as per the maintenance schedule

Now, when I service brakes at work, I do this procedure to every single vehicle I work on including my own:

1. Remove slider bolts
2. Remove caliper and hang up out of the way
3. Remove pads
4. Clean rust buildup from rotor using small prybar wedged in between the rotor and caliper bracket and turning the rotor by hand
5. Remove caliper bracket from knuckle
6. Wire brush bracket shims clean on both sides
7. Remove slider pins, wipe clean with shop rag, then re-lubricate with high-temp synthetic silicone paste
8. Re-install slider pins and burp air from accordian boots
9. Wire brush pad mounting recesses on caliper brackets
10. Lube pad mounting recesses with molybdenum paste
11. Re-install cleaned bracket shims
12. Wire brush backings of pads clean, wire wheel minting tabs of pad to remove rust buildup
13. Lube mounting tabs and backing shims with moly paste
14. Install pads
15. Lube all mouning bolts with moly paste then re-install bracket and caliper
16. Install wheels and do a quick road test

I know my process might be more involved than some other techs but I know when a car leaves my bay from a brake service, all things being equal it shod be problem free up.
 
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