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03 EX mine since new 96000 miles Dec 30 2022
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Hello All , I have searched this forum and the net with Google for a "How To" on changing the Brake Fluid ..Has anyone done this themselves ??? I was an auto mechanic a LONG time ago and it would have been easy then .. But there were no ABS or other fancy things to deal with ... don't get me wrong I"m glad the E has the good brakes they do but am not so sure how to .. Do it myself .. This time ..

A couple of ideas come to mind .. Use the old gravity method open the furthest bleeder screw first ... (after putting new fluid in the master cyl) and let it bleed out witn gravity .. Keeping the master cyl topped off ... then there's the different brake bleeding tequniques .. The old "pump her up" or the ?vac bleeder that goes on the bleeder screw of the caliper?? I have never used one of these .. Then there's the hose on the caaliper bleed screw into a container of fluid bleed system .. I never liked this one .. The best I think is the "Gravity" system although I am not sure it will work on these new brake systems ..

Soooo... Please .... Any Help ??? I am REALLY open to suggestions ... anything except .. "Take it in" to the shop .. I'm pretty poor .. Work in retail now if tht helps explain ... Thanks in advance for any help I can get on this one ... Don
 

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The old fashioned "Push and release" way works fine.
I tried to gravity bleed mine and it dribbled a bit but then stopped.


A refresher...

Suck the old fluidout of the master cylinder and replace w/ fresh.

Start bleeding at the caliper furthest from the master (Right Rear).

Open bleed screw and have someone gently depress pedal. Don't let the pedal completely bottom out if possibe.

Tighen screw, release pedal.

Repeat 'till you have nice clean clear fluid come out.

Keep an eye on the master so the fluid doesn't get too low and suck air in.

Repeat on other calipers, eventually ending up at the LF.

Note: some people prefer to "pump" the brakes repeatedly between loosening/tightening the bleeder screws, but may just cause some unnecessary "airation." I use the pump method wheen it seems like there is air trapped somewher in the system, but not for normal "replacement" bleeding.

Good luck.

Will
 

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Here is how I do it

Suck off the dirty fluid in the master cylinder.......cycle the pedal a coupla times and repeat this a few more times, the object being to get clean fluid in the mc and the first bit of the lines.......Then make sure the MC is full and the cap is off. Starting at the right rear open the bleeder and wait for the flow/drip to happen. Once you get clean fluid move on to the left rear and repeat this procedure, then on to front with the last being the left front. If you get no drip action have a helper depress the pedal ever so slightly and hold. Do not release the pedal until the bleeders are closed. DO NOT LET THE MC GO EMPTY AND DO NOT GET BRAKE FLUID ON THE PAINT. The ole pump and hold will sometimes harm the orings and seals (dirt and over extention).
 

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Do Not bottom the pedal!

If you have an inexperienced helper it pays to put a block of wood or other firm object under the brake pedal to limit its travel. I've had a couple of helpers who ignored my "just press the pedal until it moves an inch or two" and floored the brake with a bleeder open. In both instances (GM cars) I ended up with a failed master cylinder within 2,000 miles.
 

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I tell the helper to use his extra "foots" underneath the pedal. Saves time lookin' in the wood pile for just the right stick.
I usually have my wife use her foot like you said, but se doesn't always keep it in the right spot if the fluid flush takes a while. My boy is 2 now, so he'll be doing her job next spring I think. :D

Will
 

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If you have an inexperienced helper it pays to put a block of wood or other firm object under the brake pedal to limit its travel. I've had a couple of helpers who ignored my "just press the pedal until it moves an inch or two" and floored the brake with a bleeder open. In both instances (GM cars) I ended up with a failed master cylinder within 2,000 miles.
Why does pressing the brake pedal down (all of the way.....) with the bleeder open.................. Mess up the Master Cylinder????
 

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Why does pressing the brake pedal down (all of the way.....) with the bleeder open.................. Mess up the Master Cylinder????
because the part of the plunger that runs through the mc is very smooth (polished even) and the extreme end (that gets no use normally) will be rough from corrosion. As it moves against the seals in the MC it can tear them or rough them up, causing leaks. Rust/sediment from inside the resivior can cause similar problems. (E's have plastic resiviors, so that helps with the rust part.)



These leaks are usually "internal," and just reduce the amount of pressure you're applying with your foot. Most often, you'll be stopped at a traffic light or something and feel the pedal slowly sink to the floor. Sometimes the fluid will leak from the MC into the engine compartment/firewall.


Will
 

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If you have an inexperienced helper it pays to put a block of wood or other firm object under the brake pedal to limit its travel. I've had a couple of helpers who ignored my "just press the pedal until it moves an inch or two" and floored the brake with a bleeder open. In both instances (GM cars) I ended up with a failed master cylinder within 2,000 miles.
That's one of the things I really like about this forum----always picking up new ideas.;-)
 

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How much brake fluid is needed?

I'll be attempting my first brake bleed on the Element this weekend and I was wondering how much brake fluid I will need to flush the entire system. My local dealer said the 32oz bottle would be best, but I just wanted to consult EOC members first.

Thanks!

The old fashioned "Push and release" way works fine.
I tried to gravity bleed mine and it dribbled a bit but then stopped.


A refresher...

Suck the old fluidout of the master cylinder and replace w/ fresh.

Start bleeding at the caliper furthest from the master (Right Rear).

Open bleed screw and have someone gently depress pedal. Don't let the pedal completely bottom out if possibe.

Tighen screw, release pedal.

Repeat 'till you have nice clean clear fluid come out.

Keep an eye on the master so the fluid doesn't get too low and suck air in.

Repeat on other calipers, eventually ending up at the LF.

Note: some people prefer to "pump" the brakes repeatedly between loosening/tightening the bleeder screws, but may just cause some unnecessary "airation." I use the pump method wheen it seems like there is air trapped somewher in the system, but not for normal "replacement" bleeding.

Good luck.

Will
 

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...I was wondering how much brake fluid I will need to flush the entire system. My local dealer said the 32oz bottle would be best...
That is about right.

I sugest 4 "pint" size bottles instead of the one "quart" size. Onece you open the bottle any remaining fluid will go bad in a short period of time. Smaller containers help you avoid waste, even though they may cost a bit more.

Having a new pint bottle on the shelf can be handy, but a 3/4 empty bottle that is 6mo old is almost worthless. :wink:
 

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I took mine to a tire shop and they did it for $50 or $60 bucks and 15 min. I was going to do it but I dident, dont remember why??? Anyway I had already bought the brake fluid from my honda dealer. When I took it to the tire shop they said they had to use their own fluid. He told me dot 3 is dot 3 and it dosent matter what brad you use. Is that correct??? I dont know anything about brake fluid.
 

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That is about right.

I sugest 4 "pint" size bottles instead of the one "quart" size. Onece you open the bottle any remaining fluid will go bad in a short period of time. Smaller containers help you avoid waste, even though they may cost a bit more.

Having a new pint bottle on the shelf can be handy, but a 3/4 empty bottle that is 6mo old is almost worthless. :wink:
Thanks for the advice. I'll be placing an order with H&A tonight.
 

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I took mine to a tire shop and they did it for $50 or $60 bucks and 15 min. I was going to do it but I dident, dont remember why??? Anyway I had already bought the brake fluid from my honda dealer. When I took it to the tire shop they said they had to use their own fluid. He told me dot 3 is dot 3 and it dosent matter what brad you use. Is that correct??? I dont know anything about brake fluid.
Wrong different brake fluids have different dry and wet boiling points. The important number is the wet boiling point.

I use ATE Gold. Castrol LMA is good as is Ford Heavy Duty.

Not sure what the wet boiling point of the Honda Fluid.


Fred
 

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The fluid is mostly the same. DOT3 is DOT3....you can use DOT4 instead which has a higher boiling point. Some fluids are rated as DOT3/DOT4 to supposedly help prevent confusion.

I like Valvoline SynPower. Castrol LMA is also very good. Fresh and clean and the proper type is what matters most!
 

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Are there any special tools needed to accomplish this? All I probably need is something to suction up the fluid out of the reservoir and then a little hose to attach somewhere near/on a bleeder screw? This is the last fluid I need to change on this baby and it will be all new fluids within the last month. I have never touched brakes before so my experience is nil.
 

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Are there any special tools needed to accomplish this? All I probably need is something to suction up the fluid out of the reservoir and then a little hose to attach somewhere near/on a bleeder screw? This is the last fluid I need to change on this baby and it will be all new fluids within the last month. I have never touched brakes before so my experience is nil.
No, nothing special is required other than the turkey baster and hose you've already mentioned. You'll need a container to store/catch the old fluid (nothing exotic, old disposable water bottles are popular).

You could consider a brake bleeder kit. Of course, some will argue this method is better. Others will argue it's worse. One thing is certain, if you're doing this by yourself this kit will make it much easier.
 

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Is this done with the car on or off?
 

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Wrong different brake fluids have different dry and wet boiling points. The important number is the wet boiling point.

I use ATE Gold. Castrol LMA is good as is Ford Heavy Duty.

Not sure what the wet boiling point of the Honda Fluid.


Fred

dude its a honda not a semi truck! I really doubt your brake fluid will ever boil unless there is something wrong with your brakes or you dont change the brake fluid on a regular basis. The reason you change brake fluid every 2 or 3 years regardless of milage is that the brake fluid slowly leeches water through the brake lines contaminating the fluid and lowering the boiling point and causing corrosion. If the brake fluid boils it puts bubbles in your brakelines. As long as you change the fluid out every 2 or 3 years with any dot 3 or 4 fluid your cool, and as far as normal owners go way ahead of the game.
 
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