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Discussion Starter #1
I've included the parts diagram to be sure we're talking about the same components. The question.... Is it acceptable to use the same lubricant for the slide pins (red), in between shims and pads (blue), and on the pad tabs and pad clips (green)?
brake.jpg

I've been using AGS Sil-Glyde on all and the passenger rear slide pins seized last spring. Now the front passenger slide pins are seized. Before I do the front set I wanted to get some opinions if I should be using different lubricants or not. At the very least I will be switching to a different brand. Thinking of Permatex Ceramic Extreme... any thoughts on that?

Right along the same lines here is a question I've thought about. When pushing the slide pins back into the boots should you push the pins in all the way and seat the boot on the pin? Or.. should you push the pin in half way and stretch the boot out to seat it on the pin? The first way seems like it creates a vacuum and pulls the pads in towards the rotor, not allowing them to float of the rotor after breaking. The second way traps air in the boot and, at least at first, seems to push the pad away from the rotor. Seems negligible either way but just wanted to ask.

Thanks all.. Jeff
 

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Honda says.
Honda Caliper Grease 08C30-B0224M 4853958 High-temperature, silicone-based grease used to lubricate caliper slide pins.
Molykote 44MA Call Dow Corning: (800) 248-2481 Moly grease used between the brake shoes and backing plate and on the ends of the shoes.
 

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Honda says.
Honda Caliper Grease 08C30-B0224M 4853958 High-temperature, silicone-based grease used to lubricate caliper slide pins.
Molykote 44MA Call Dow Corning: (800) 248-2481 Moly grease used between the brake shoes and backing plate and on the ends of the shoes.
I understand! Sil-Glyde is not the first choice for this application. It will not last under the extreme conditions generated in the system. Heat is the biggest issue on these parts. Heat generated by the friction of the pads on the rotors is distributed to all the other parts. Then when splashed with cold salty water in winter conditions, it gets sucked in by the contraction of the parts. That equates to rust, and corrosion forming quickly. Result is seized parts.

That's the reason that Honda recommends lubricating the parts as part of scheduled maintenance.

I don't care what product you use. The truth is that the heating of the parts thins the grease. Then a coating of salt dries, on the area. The next time it heats up, the salt will absorb some of the oil/grease. Then be washed away the next time it gets wet. Over time the end result is an unprotected part.

I use the Amsoil NLGI#2 high-temperature it does as well as any other That I have used. There are 3 NLGI 2's so pick the High temperature for this application.


Dom
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I use the Amsoil NLGI#2 high-temperature it does as well as any other That I have used. There are 3 NLGI 2's so pick the High temperature for this application.
Are you suggesting I use the Amsoil grease for the slide pins, between pads and shims, and on the contact points of the tabs and pad clips? Or do you mean on the slide pins only, using another product (such as Honda's M-77) on tabs and shims?
 

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I use "brake & caliper grease" on all three spots. Sometime a different product on the back of the pads if provided by the pad manufacturer. BTW...I put the grease where the pad/shim meets the caliper....not between the pad and the shim.

CRC or Castrol brand. I haven't had a problem yet on many cars.

 

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When pushing the slide pins back into the boots should you push the pins in all the way and seat the boot on the pin? Or.. should you push the pin in half way and stretch the boot out to seat it on the pin? The first way seems like it creates a vacuum and pulls the pads in towards the rotor, not allowing them to float of the rotor after breaking. The second way traps air in the boot and, at least at first, seems to push the pad away from the rotor. Seems negligible either way but just wanted to ask.

Thanks all.. Jeff
I've just been pushing the pin in, and the boot seats itself. I've done this the past 2 years, and have not noticed any ill effects.
 

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I use and have been using Anti-Seize for years. I use it for lots of applications. Especially on bolts.

That may work well in your area. However in this area, It turns to concrete when it gets cold. It was designed to keep bolts/nuts from rusting into place. It is not designed to be used as a lubricant on moving parts.

I have seen the result of it's use on sliders in the winter. The pads won't move. Frozen in place. Then the heat generated by the stuck pad frees the part temporarily. Then it repeats the process. The end result is the pads are gone in under a month.

Dom
 

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That may work well in your area. However in this area, It turns to concrete when it gets cold. It was designed to keep bolts/nuts from rusting into place. It is not designed to be used as a lubricant on moving parts.

I have seen the result of it's use on sliders in the winter. The pads won't move. Frozen in place. Then the heat generated by the stuck pad frees the part temporarily. Then it repeats the process. The end result is the pads are gone in under a month.

Dom
That's good to know...
for some reason, everyone I've talked to up here uses anti seize...
I know that we have some that's formulated specifically for brakes, but I wonder if they also take into account the seasons. They must do, becasue it's used so often.
I'll have to look into that...
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Found it:
Canadian Tire Anti seize

Permatex copper antiseize

When I worked at Canadian Tire, the mechanics only used this for all the brake jobs...
 

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I use "brake & caliper grease" on all three spots. Sometime a different product on the back of the pads if provided by the pad manufacturer. BTW...I put the grease where the pad/shim meets the caliper....not between the pad and the shim.

CRC or Castrol brand. I haven't had a problem yet on many cars.

I use the same stuff for the "pins".

For behind the pads i use molykote.
 
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