Honda Element Owners Club banner

1 - 20 of 209 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Front Brake Pad Replacement

Since I needed to change my brake pads and rotors today I decided to do a couple of write-ups on how to do each. Some pictures might be duplicates but the text for each job will just discuss what is required for that particular job.

Tools Used

Floor Jack (do not use the jack that came with Element)
Mechanix Wear Gloves
Breaker bar (1/2")
Torque Wrench (1/2")
12 mm socket (3/8")
19 mm socket (1/2")
6" long extension (1/2")
socket wrench (3/8")
New Honda Brake Pads (front)
CRC Disk Brake Quiet (or equivalent)
8" Screw driver (or something equivalent)

The first thing you need to do is jack your Element up and remove the front wheel. Best practice is to loosen the 5 lugs before getting the wheel off the ground. Make sure to set your parking brake as well for added safety and to prevent the E from rolling off your jack.

I only took pictures of the passenger side since the work that needs to be performed is the exact same for both sides.

Once the wheel has been removed it is time to remove the brake caliper. Use your 3/8" socket wrench and 12mm socket to loosen then remove the 2 bolts that hold the caliper to the caliper holder.

Here is the upper bolt being removed.



Here is the lower bolt being removed



Once those two bolts are removed then you need to remove the caliper. Be careful and don't let it drop. Also, don't twist or pull on the brake line (hose).



continued



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Here is the caliper removed from the brake pads. You can see the pads still in their holders.



The best place I have found to place the rotor to get it out of the way is to hang it on the strut as shown below.



Now you need to remove the old pads. The first thing to do is to remove the two wire springs that tie the pads to one another. Your Element might not have them if the mechanic that did the last install didn't put them in place. They help prevent the brakes from squealing by pushing the pads off the rotors.





Now remove the brake pads themselves. They will each slide away from the rotor. If you have trouble grabbing hold of the pads then use the screw driver to help get them away from the rotor enough so you can grab hold. Careful not to gouge the rotor itself.






continued



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
The next thing you need to do is to press the piston back into the caliper. Before doing so check the brake master cylinder and make sure that your fluid isn't above the full line. If it is then you will need to remove some fluid so as to not over flow the reservoir. I didn't have this issue so didn't take any pics of the brake master cylinder.

To press the piston back into the rotor you can do as I do and use a screw driver or you can use a clamp or any number of other methods. Just whatever method you use, be careful of the rubber boot that surrounds the piston, don't tear it.



Here's the piston pressed back into the caliper.



The difference between the old and new brake pads!



Before installing the anti-squeal plates you can either use the packet of anti-squeal or use CRC as I do. I find the CRC to work very well and is nowhere near as messy as using a little packet.



The larger plate goes on the outside pad (the one without the wear indicator). Apply a good amount to the plate not the pads, but don't go crazy, it will spread around once the pads are in place.



Then place it onto the pad.



Do the same for the other pad. Not that the smaller plate goes onto the pad with the wear indicator, this is the metal piece that is standing up on one end of the pad.



continued



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Both pads ready to be installed.



Place the pads into the carrier the same as you removed the old pads. The pad with the wear indicator goes to the back of the rotor, this is the one with the smaller plate mounted to it. The other pad goes to the out side of the rotor.



Now installed the 2 metal springs into the holes in the pads.



Take the caliper and place it over the newly installed pads the reverse of how you took it off. If the caliper won't fit over the pads it means you didn't press the piston in enough. Once the caliper is in place reinstall the 2 bolts and tighten them.



All finished!

Note: I also did a rotor replacement at the same time so the rotors are new in the picture. I have also done a write-up on how to replace your rotors... look for that as well when the time comes.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Mod-erator
Joined
·
4,573 Posts
Great write up Larry....that caliper looks out of place now :D

Glad you did this as I'll be changing mine out pretty soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Sweet!

Thanks so much for creating that tutorial! We just bought a 2004 DX from Carmax and I found out I'll need new brakes in not too long from my mechanic when he gave it a pre-purchase once-over.

I've written up a few tutorials on replacing bits of audio and other cosmetic improvements on my Acura and I'm always surprised at how much extra effort goes into remembering to take pictures and explaining what I was thinking when I pulled everything apart. The other side of the coin is that I'd never have had the confidence to take on the projects that I have if someone hadn't posted a tutorial (to be fair, installing keyless entry in the E was a joke - it took longer to program the remotes than it did to install the black box. :) )

A Haynes or Chilton manual or the factory service manual are no substitute for a few key photos of a real vehicle - rust, grime, warts and all - and a little bit of explanation. So thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,657 Posts
Yeah - something looked shiny ... too shiny ...
Lol my thoughts exactly. IMO Larry you should have pulled out a dremel and a metal brush attachment and 'touch up' the caliper a little bit. Rust dust is good for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the compliments. :)

Yes, the new rotors were addressed in one of the posts above, I think in the first post. I also will be doing the write-up on how to change the rotors as well. Didn't have the time to do that last night and just got back from an 80 mile bike ride... leave for Cancun tomorrow morning so will try to get this done in a little while. :)



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Out of curiosity I looked at my service manual to see what Honda says and I found a couple interesting things. First, they recommend just pulling the lower bolt and rotating the caliper up and out of the way. That avoids the need to hang the caliper but I wonder how much room that gives you to work.

Also, I compared their pad replacement process for the front with the rear and noticed they recommend lubing the rear caliper piston at the mating surface with the pad. They don't mention doing this with the front; now I'm left wondering what's so special about the rear piston that it needs grease (or what's so special about the front that it doesn't.)

Honda's also big on pulling the pad retainers (between the calipers and the pads) and cleaning and greasing those as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
I would have replace the pad clips in addition. Low slide force is very important. Good pictures.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
The rear piston is a solid surface if memory serves. I replaced those about 18 months ago. The front piston is hollow so there isn't much surface to lube.

As for lubing the retaining or replacing the retaining clips. Yes, that is an option on both counts. I didn't think to pick up the retaining clips but can again in 30-35k.

As for just rotating the caliper out of the way. I never do that as it always slips down and slams a finger. Plus this time I was replacing my rotors and needed everything removed, that entire write-up will be coming either during the week if I get about 15 minutes while away or I will do it when I get home... sorry. :) I doubt it's an issue as I don't know who else is about to replace their rotors. :)



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,645 Posts
Larry,

nice write up....thanks. The subject has come up so many times on the forum, but there hasn't been a thread we can direct those with questions too. :cool:

I'd like to add/recomend the following:

1. When pushing the piston back into the caliper I like to loosen the bleeder strew and push the piston back by hand. A clamp will work fine, but using your fingers w/ no fluid pressure insures that the piston moves freely in the caliper. It can also help push some crud out the bleeder too.

2. I like using a little brake grease on the "ears" or "tabs" of the pads and the "slides"/mounting points, so they are less likely to stick in the calipers. I also grease the pins that allow caliper movement (undeneath those little black "boots")

3. I recomend bleeding the brakes anytime the pads are replaced. (Or every 2-3years, whichever comes first)

Thanks.

Will
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
528 Posts
Excellent Write up. I also noticed that you did not lube the stainless steel pad carriers, those should be cleaned and lubed witht he molykote that is included. I do not like to use the orange or blue brake goop because it actually glues the parts together to prevent squeeling, since you are using factory pads the shims do that job when used with the molykote. Although it appears you did not put it on the outer surface of the shims so it should work just as well. The purpose of he shims is to allow the pads to float a little and they are softer than the seel pad backing and calipers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
The brakes need to have the fluid changed. Since I didn't have anyone around to help and my power bleeder is long since gone I will be doing it when I get back from vacation.

As to the use of the Molykote that comes with the brake pads, I never liked using it as it washes off too easily and doesn't last then the brakes squeak, using the CRC stuff I have never once had noise issues.

I will do the write-up for the rotor replacement when I get back home next weekend or even during the week. Not enough time tonight to get it done.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Thanks!

Thanks for the pics. I just did the front brakes and really appreciated seeing just how they put things together before doingthe actual job. It helps with mental preperation everytime you do a new car for the first time!

The only tip I'd like to add is remember to remove the brake fluid reservoir cap. Also note: As your old brakes pads became thinner you probably added brake fluid. Remember that some fluid will leak out of reservoir as you push caliper piston in and will spill over if you dont first remove some of it.
 
1 - 20 of 209 Posts
Top