Honda Element Owners Club banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will the Element be able to carry 300 pounds in a cargo carrier with a 2" receiver like the one in the photo? Or is 300 pounds too much weight to be hanging off the back of the vehicle? The trips would be short hops to a landscaping supply company, max speed about 35MPH.

Tire Rectangle Outdoor furniture Sports equipment Wheel
 

· Registered
No Element yet
Joined
·
24 Posts
I believe the max towing capacity of the E is 1500 lbs (maybe 2000) so that puts the max tongue weight at 150 lbs (maybe 200). Plus that hitch carrier is cantilevered so you would multiply the weight by about 1.7. Plus I think you'd need a class 3 hitch.

That said, there's plenty of anecdotal evidence that the E can handle it without issue. Somebody here, recently posted their Element with their race bike on a hitch carrier and that bike weighed probably around 350 lbs. He said his E was his track day vehicle. So there's that.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
The shorter you can get that receiver insert, the better off you'll be. Getting one that doesn't fold would help (unless it's already yours, of course.) Consider shortening the insert as much as you can, and drilling new holes. It's just mild steel.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I believe the max towing capacity of the E is 1500 lbs (maybe 2000) so that puts the max tongue weight at 150 lbs (maybe 200). Plus that hitch carrier is cantilevered so you would multiply the weight by about 1.7. Plus I think you'd need a class 3 hitch.

That said, there's plenty of anecdotal evidence that the E can handle it without issue. Somebody here, recently posted their Element with their race bike on a hitch carrier and that bike weighed probably around 350 lbs. He said his E was his track day vehicle. So there's that.
Is there an aftermarket hitch that is the hands-down favorite?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The shorter you can get that receiver insert, the better off you'll be. Getting one that doesn't fold would help (unless it's already yours, of course.) Consider shortening the insert as much as you can, and drilling new holes. It's just mild steel.
I will take that advice. Any recommendations on an aftermarket hitch?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
There seem to be two choices: Draw-Tite and Curt. I would probably choose the Draw-Tite, because the hitch mounts with bolts that are in shear, and doesn't rely on bent brackets to bear the weight. The Curt has bolts that mount thru double-bend brackets, from below, so they're in tension. The detail I don't have is what the "frame" is like at each of those mounting points. If it's the same thickness, and the same diameter bolts are used, then the shear mounting is stronger. All that said, the thing I don't like about the Draw-Tite is the round tube as the body of the hitch, instead of square tube. Just a personal preference -- haven't done the engineering. However, on my similar-vintage Suburban, the round-tube hitch was quickly pitched in favor of a 'traditional' square-tube hitch. This was based on gut instinct, and a conversation with the NHTSA investigator soon after I purchased the truck. Those hitches were almost recalled. Almost.

Back to Element hitches: Both items mentioned have identical ratings that exceed the capabilities of the Element. 350 tongue weight, 3500 towing. I might do the first one. I would not do the second.

I think the one on my Element is the Draw-Tite, because of the round tubes. Since I have a Suburban and a Class C RV, the Element is not top of the tow-vehicle list. It is, however, top of the to-be-towed-by-RV list...
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top