Honda Element Owners Club banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Recently I went on a 6 hour round trip. By the time I made it home my E was not driving well, shaking steering wheel and rolling into my complex I am pretty sure I heard a squeaking sound. I thought it might be the brakes and warped rotors so I took it in to have the brakes done. Turns out the front ones were okay but they did do my back brakes and I believe resurfaced all rotors.

Before having this work done the car did not roll forward when I removed my foot from the brake and it also does not roll in reverse either. I thought this might be due to the brakes and it may very well still be if the front ones have a stuck caliper or something of that nature. I just assumed that the shop that did the work would have noticed something like that. I have not been able to jack it up to test the front wheels to see if the brakes are sticking, or if something else similar is going on. I am by no means any sort of mechanic and I probably have no clue what I am talking about!

Has anyone else had this issue? I am also going to check the transmission fluid tomorrow morning, I am hoping that there is not a bigger underlying issue here.

Any suggestions or thoughts are greatly appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,025 Posts
Take a look through the wheels and see if the rotor surface looks smooth or ridgy. If they did just resurface everything, they ought to look like it. The drawback of just looking at the outside is that you can't see what the inside is doing. Drive for a few minutes and then use the smell test. If they're dragging as bad as you said, one or more is probably getting warm. If you don't see/smell/intuit anything, jack it up and see what's dragging. Don't assume that the squeaking has anything to do with this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Rear calipers are very common in getting "sticky" they will drag. I use a laser thermometer on the calipers to look for ones that out of sync with the rest. Very easy and quick to do. Just drive for a short distance and get out and quickly test the temps of each rotor. If one is much hotter than the others you have a sticky caliper.

Berz out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input, I'll be jacking it up and checking out the front end today. Back seems to be doing ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Re-reading your post might be a wheel bearing failure as well. Shake your front wheels and see if there is any play.

Berz out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,025 Posts
Re-reading your post might be a wheel bearing failure as well. Shake your front wheels and see if there is any play.

Berz out.
As the age of the fleet increases, things like wheel bearing failures might be seen more often but I doubt it'd act the way this one was described. Best rule of thumb is to look at the simplest cause first and work up to more common problems and then the unusual last.

If you jack up the front wheels first and don't see anything, don't neglect checking the rears. As Berz pointed out, it's more common to see the REAR calipers freezing up than the fronts. My theory is that the front wheels kick up the dirt that ends up messing with the rear brakes. Another problem with the rears is that the emergency brake shoes can make getting the rear rotors difficult to get loose and sometimes it's easier to tell the owner that nothing's wrong instead of admitting that you just don't wanna do the work.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top