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Just changed my oil with honda hg 5w20. I had never used any oem oil before because I figured that it was just rebadged over priced stuff but I got a deal at my dealership so I thought I'd try. The first thing I noticed is that it is thicker than most 5w20's which is really intristing. That lets me know that honda thinks that you should use something more at the thicker end of the spectrum. Its pretty close to castrol 5w20 in thickness which is the thickest 5w20 on the market. It was more like a regular oil (pennz yb, valvoline conventional, ect.) 5w30. I dident have it tested or anything but that is just an obervation. Because of it being thicker it seems to quiet down the engine noise. Maybe because the thicker oil helps the timing chain glide more instead of being drug through the engine??

The last oci I used an A02 filter that I'm going to cut open and post pics of. I just want to see how it held up after 5k. This time I used an A01 and I gotta tell anyone who is looking to buy filters the A02 is easyer to put on because of the outie nipple or collar that is around the threads. Since I screw on my filter through the wheel well I have to go by feel and the collar just makes it easyer to find and not cross thread.
 

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Just changed my oil with honda hg 5w20. I had never used any oem oil before because I figured that it was just rebadged over priced stuff but I got a deal at my dealership so I thought I'd try. The first thing I noticed is that it is thicker than most 5w20's which is really interesting. That lets me know that Honda thinks that you should use something more at the thicker end of the spectrum. Its pretty close to castrol 5w20 in thickness which is the thickest 5w20 on the market. It was more like a regular oil (pennz yb, valvoline conventional, ect.) 5w30. I didn't have it tested or anything but that is just an observation. Because of it being thicker it seems to quiet down the engine noise. Maybe because the thicker oil helps the timing chain glide more instead of being drug through the engine??

The last oci I used an A02 filter that I'm going to cut open and post pics of. I just want to see how it held up after 5k. This time I used an A01 and I gotta tell anyone who is looking to buy filters the A02 is easyer to put on because of the outie nipple or collar that is around the threads. Since I screw on my filter through the wheel well I have to go by feel and the collar just makes it easyer to find and not cross thread.
Good info ryland, never really thought about pour thickness of new oils. I guess I always just thought all 5w-20's were the same. So maybe some of these synthetics that pour so thin might make the engine have a little more mechanical noise...hum. Now I need to go pour some out and see.:smile: I like to run synthetics, now (because of you;-)) I'll need to do some pour tests to see what one is thicker and see if I can notice any differences in noise.

I look forward to the pictures of your cut open filter, I'm really curious to see whats in there. Do you know of any filtering differences between the A01 and the A02?

Thanks for the info!
 

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The first thing I noticed is that it is thicker than most 5w20's which is really intristing. That lets me know that honda thinks that you should use something more at the thicker end of the spectrum. Its pretty close to castrol 5w20 in thickness which is the thickest 5w20 on the market. It was more like a regular oil (pennz yb, valvoline conventional, ect.) 5w30. I dident have it tested or anything but that is just an obervation. Because of it being thicker it seems to quiet down the engine noise. Maybe because the thicker oil helps the timing chain glide more instead of being drug through the engine??
Pretty sure this is impossible. If they are the same oil viscosity, they should flow the same. Maybe it was hotter/colder than when you usually do the change. Either way the entire purpose of the #'s on the oil is to tell you the viscosity (resistance to flow). Whether it is synthetic or conventional, they should flow the same, that is why there are standards. Honda does just use re-badged oil, nothing special.
 

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Pretty sure this is impossible. If they are the same oil viscosity, they should flow the same. Maybe it was hotter/colder than when you usually do the change. Either way the entire purpose of the #'s on the oil is to tell you the viscosity (resistance to flow). Whether it is synthetic or conventional, they should flow the same, that is why there are standards. Honda does just use re-badged oil, nothing special.

Incorrect sir. The wt# have a wide range of varience. If you look at an oil PDS such as these:

http://www.pennzoil.com/documents/Pennzoil Conventional.pdf

http://www.pennzoil.com/documents/Platinum Full Synthetic Motor Oil.pdf

http://www.castrol.com/liveassets/b...NG/local_assets/downloads/p,q/psd_gtx_usa.pdf

http://www.castrol.com/liveassets/b...local_assets/downloads/p,q/pds_syntec_usa.pdf

You'll see that the cSt numbers which is how thick an oil is at 40 and 100 C are different as well as the viscosity index, pour point, and specific gravity. Oil wt's are very different from brand to brand.

The only oil analisys I can find of honda 5w20 was done in 03 so the oil may have changed since then but the viscosity at 100C was 9.8 which would make it thicker than castrol syntec 5w30.
 

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My neighbor once bought 5 x 1 qt. bottles of Pennzoil from Oreilly's (don't worry, I kicked him for using Quaker State products). It was the strangest thing I have ever seen......5 bottles.......5 different consistency's.......5 different colors of oil. Even though I was not totally shocked since it was quaker state, I called in and spoke with an "oil tech" and blah blah blah this is normal. Not normal by my standards....:rolleyes:
 

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The viscosity of dino oil at operating temperature has to be thicker than the same weight of a good synthetic because the film strength is so much lower. The reason something like Mobil-1 can save some mpg's is that a thinner viscosity can lubricate the engine as well or better and need less work to flow through the bearings that need pressure.

The biggest forced lubrication bearings I've ever seen were the bearings on the telescope at Palomar - the 200" telescope? It's huge, but the whole thing turns on a couple of sleeve bearings with a thin film of light oil pumped between the surfaces so it's practically frictionless. When the oil pump isturned off, the whole thing locks in place.
 
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