Honda Element Owners Club banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My light is coming on for the tire pressure in the cold out here in Chicagoland. I did some driving today and the light went off. I guess the tires got warmed up. Do you guys fill up your tires with a few more pounds in the winter to keep the light from coming on or do you just ignore the issue?
RDB:D:p:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I had the same problem the other morning when it was very cold. It was 6 degrees as I recall. All four tires showed 35lbs. The manual says they should be at 35lbs. But the sticker on the door says 38lbs...I think. I stopped into the dealer...since it is less than 6 weeks old...they topped them off and off I went.
 

·
Registered
07 2wd 5-speedauto
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
The tpm is way too sensitive, always 32 in each tire this AM it was 18* so sure as s**t the light was on.
Same for the 'passenger air bag is off' light who cares and why do i need to know this.
 

·
Registered
07 2wd 5-speedauto
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
I had the same problem the other morning when it was very cold. It was 6 degrees as I recall. All four tires showed 35lbs. The manual says they should be at 35lbs. But the sticker on the door says 38lbs...I think. I stopped into the dealer...since it is less than 6 weeks old...they topped them off and off I went.
This is my point, Most people will learn to ignore the light.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
My light has been coming on when it is cold as well. Usually around 20 degrees or lower. I always check the tires to make sure they are all right, then just drive with the light on. Yesterday, the light did not go off after driving about 20 minutes...Must be something with the sensor.

- Justo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
This is my point, Most people will learn to ignore the light.
that's what I do.

last time the light came on, I let it go for about two weeks, until I did something about it. Basically I refilled them when I noticed an actual loss in performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,263 Posts
Yes, tires do loose pressure when it gets cold.. Old timers without the automated sensors get into the habit of checking the tires on a cold morning, and adding some air if needed. And, yes, tire pressure does increase as you drive. The recommended pressure are always stated as 'cold pressure' - measured at the start of the day, before you start driving.
 

·
Chief Has Been Element Owner
Joined
·
4,759 Posts
You dont really need to be an old timer, this is common science: cold air condenses, heat makes it expand.
 

·
..
Joined
·
12,178 Posts
Today has been one of the coldest days here this winter.......I don't have TPMS on my E....but i do have it on my Accord. Today would have been the day i expected my light to come on.....No light yet. Might be that the sensors used on the E are too sensitive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,339 Posts
i thought i wrote something about this before.... according to several mechanics and our manual.....

tire pressure expand and contracts in heat and cold respectively. Therefore if there's a sudden drop of temperature and your TPMS is borderline it will activate it.....

Just go to the gas station, pump it up, drive a few miles and it should be fine.......

both my Es had their TPMS on in December when the temp dropped, so i over pumped to about 34 / 36 lbs of air and its okay right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Good to know it not just mine... Mine came on two nights ago after sitting for a couple hours in 25 degree weather. Probably won't be too much of an issue here in NC but it has been cold. I checked the pressure the next morning and added a few pounds. Seems to be fine now.

In the manual it says it will come on with if your pressure is significantly low or a sudden drop in pressure. I wouldn't consider a few pounds low to be significant but I guess Honda does:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
NASCAR uses nitrogen gas to reduce pressure variance. I hear there are some shops offering this for passenger tires----just a thought?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,263 Posts
Nitrogen does not eliminate pressure variation with temperature, it just makes it more predictable. It follows the ideal gas law PV=RT. What really makes the difference is the lack of water vapor (ie. is dry air), not the lack of oxygen. Water vapor condenses at colder temperatures, introducing a nonlinearity into the pressure temperature relation.

As a secondary effect, nitrogen may leak out of the tire at a slower rate than a nitrogen/oxygen mix. But that leakage shouldn't be a problem if you are in the habit of checking your tire pressures more than a couple of times a year.
 

·
EOC Rank: Crankypants
Joined
·
14,898 Posts
Honda on nitrogen

FYI, here's what Honda says in the Sept. 2006 Service News:

Nitrogen Inflation: What's Our Position?

Surf any automobile tire-related website these days, and you'll likely see something mentioned about nitrogen inflation. It's becoming a hot topic. We've gotten a number of inquiries lately concerning American Honda's position on this practice.

When it comes to inflating automobile tires, it's our position that ordinary, dry compressed air—which is about 80 percent nitrogen already—is the best choice. That's because it's more readily available, and the benefits of using nitrogen simply don't appear to outweigh those of using compressed air.

The practice of inflating tires with nitrogen really isn't anything new; it's been around a long time. It's been commonly used on aerospace vehicles, commercial and military aircraft, military vehicles, race cars, and even heavy off-road construction equipment. Here's why:

•To meet rigid safety and performance specs, the required tire inflation pressures are often very high, especially in the aerospace industry. The tire inflation pressure for NASA's space shuttle, for instance, is a whopping 315 psi!

•Nitrogen is an inert gas; it doesn't combust or oxidize.

•The process used to compress nitrogen excludes water vapor. Water vapor can expand if the temperature climbs above 212°F.

•Tires inflated with nitrogen leak slower over time than those inflated with compressed air.

Automobile tires, on the other hand, are subjected to an entirely different set of conditions. Here's why inflating tires with nitrogen offers no real advantages:

•Although tires inflated with nitrogen leak slower over time than those inflated with compressed air, they still leak and need to be reinflated to maintain proper pressure. If you can't find a place that offers nitrogen inflation—and there aren't yet all that many places that do—your only option left is to reinflate with compressed air. Doing that drops the nitrogen purity.

•Nitrogen offers no better protection against road hazards such as cuts and punctures. So no matter what you inflate the tire with, you still need to check the condition and pressure of the tires at least once a month as recommended in the O/M.

•Tires that are inflated with compressed air and properly maintained offer the same fuel economy, tread wear, and ride comfort as those inflated with nitrogen.

•Nitrogen for automobile tires is produced by nitrogen generators, which typically get about 95 percent purity. But to actually get that level of purity into an automobile tire, you would have to deflate and inflate that tire with nitrogen several times. If you're not careful doing this repeated deflation and inflation process, the purity level winds up being closer to 90 percent (compared to the approximate80 percent nitrogen already in compressed air). Because of this, those claims of less pressure loss with nitrogen aren't valid.

So here's the bottom line: Nitrogen is an ideal gas for inflating tires in aircraft, military vehicles, race cars, and heavy off-road equipment, but when it comes to automobile tires, it offers no apparent advantages over ordinary, dry compressed air. Our advice to you: Just stick with the air you breathe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,263 Posts
•The process used to compress nitrogen excludes water vapor. Water vapor can expand if the temperature climbs above 212°F.
.
I have qualms about the phrasing about that point. 212F is significant as being the boiling point at atmospheric pressure (sea level). The boiling point rises with pressure. Water vapor exists below the boiling point, and contracts and expands much like an ideal gas (and the other gases in the air). It's the potential condensation and freezing of water vapor that is problematic, not its normal expansion.

Otherwise the information makes sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Do you guys fill up your tires with a few more pounds in the winter to keep the light from coming on or do you just ignore the issue?
RDB:D:p:p
I ignore it until I notice a decrease in braking efficiency, pickup, or gas mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,263 Posts
I like to check the tire pressures on a cold morning (not in a heated garage), and add air as needed (I keep a good electric compressor in the car).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Cold Weather Pressure Light

Yes, the light will come on when starting out in the cold weather. The solution is to keep the tires inflated as specified to satisfy the sensor, however, during the snowy season the tires have better traction when on the lower end of the specified pressure.

My thought is the desired pressure should be maintained accordingly, rather than adjusting pressures just to satisfy the light.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top