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Hi all,

My Netbook is hooked up to the Auxiliary port in my Element for streaming Internet Radio. I'm having a problem with electrical noise when the charger is plugged in to the computer. My charging cord is plugged into a 150 watt inverter; I initially thought it was a problem with the Inverter being right next to the auxiliary port and running more or less inline with the audio cord. I tried moving the Inverter to the rear 12 volt outlet, making sure the two cords were nowhere near each other. It made no difference.

Does anyone know of any solutions? Does anyone know of a noise filter I can use on the audio cord to filter out the interference? Would it help to use a 12v computer charger instead, bypassing the inverter completely?

Greg
 

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BigAl is probably right, but I do have ONE question for ya.
Do you get any "noise" from the laptop if you run it on
just the battery while it is hooked up to the aux jack??

If the answer is no, then BigAl's solution will probably work.
If the answer is yes, the problem is in the audio card of
you laptop.

I do custom A/V in custom built homes, and
99 time out of a 100, when we hook up a computer to
our gear, we get some nasty hums and buzzes!!! Audio
cards in computers are generally really cheap. Here is
what we use in the home environment:

http://www.jensen-transformers.com/
 

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I've had this problem before as well, hooking a laptop up to the aux input in a car. First thing to try is running the laptop off its battery and if you still hear the noise, it's the sound card. If that's the case, you can try picking up an inexpensive USB sound card like the Turtle Beach Audio Advantage Amigo. It's small and puts out very high quality sound.

If the sound only shows up when the laptop is plugged into its charger then it's ground loop noise. A USB sound card may still help with this but more than likely you'll need either a ground loop isolator or a better quality inverter. Better inverters have noise reduction circuitry built in to reduce ground loop noise like this.
 
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