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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a carpenter and currently own a Ford Ranger. The gas mileage sucks, I'm considering converting to an Element. I haul a 6x10 utility trailer, but not on a daily basis, I leave it at job sites. I do haul lumber almost daily, large loads I have delivered. Also, I constantly have a load of tools. Anyone out there use an Element for similar applications? How's it holding out? Any suggestions?
 

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I could be wrong but seems like there were some posts out there from folks who have transported similar materials. You may want to try to do a search unless someone posts a reply here. With the seats up or taken out there is more room in the E than you would think for.
 

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I'm a carpenter and currently own a Ford Ranger. The gas mileage sucks,

That has a different meaning to just about everyone.. What exactly is your definition of poor mileage?

With a full load of tools, I would suspect that the Element will give you somewhere between 16 and 20 MPG.

Dom
 

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Ranger Vs Element -MPG

I own both a Ranger and an Element. Ranger is a 4 Cyl manual and it gets better gas mileage than my Element. Under the new govt standards the Ranger is rated 19 city/24 hwy. And the Element is rated 20/25. Not much difference there. I would switch for other reasons, but not the gas mileage.
 

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Construction use

I recently bought the Element for the same reason, though I don't pull a trailer. What I ended up doing is keeping my full size van to get set up on the job and then I will take the Element to the site each day saving on wear and tear on the older Van as well as some money on gas. Not to mention a more comfortable ride with a more reliable vehicle. It would be better if the Element was a little longer for carrying material, but you can get some 8 footers in there. I haven't tried sheetrock or plywood yet. I have taken the rear seats out completely and there is a fair amount of room back there, just not too long. Eventually I do hope to use the Element alone for work. As a relatively new owner, I can tell you, I am very happy with with the Element. It is a great truck.
 

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construction and the E

I would agree the mpg has got to be a push. Fully loaded the 4 banger is lucky to pull 20 mpg. Even with really bitchn' lumber racks that are available for the "E" I would still bet that Ranger would load alot more of almost any thing. What I do like aout the E is the interior for tools and equipment and keeping the more expensive stuff out of the weather. I would hate to see some one load 6 sheets of ply on top of an E and watch the OE mounts peel off the roof due to lift of the plywood or hard brake. I know what holds that little steel ribbon onto the roof. It is just spot welds. A truck bed is bolted to the frame.
 

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And you can't load 4x8 sheets flat in the back. The E is a great little car, but I wouldn't use it for heavy duty work. Your box trailer-empty-is probably near the weight limit for the E.
 

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Though it really depends on where you are pulling the trailer to/from. Are you going up and down alot of hills or is it mainly highway driving? I would think if you were pulling it around on mainly flat roads you will probably be ok. I can't imagine the Ranger would weigh more than the E so I would think if you had a big load in the trailer the Ranger would have a harder time stopping it than the E. Like you said, the really big loads of lumber get delivered. How much do you put in the trailer??

FWIW I had about 15 40lb bags of landscape rock in the back of mine and while it was a little droopy in the rear it didn't act like it was going to crap out. It still moved pretty well. Also I would imagine you could get a little stiffer shocks in the back to compensate.
 
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