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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

In the past, when I changed oil in various cars that use crush washers, these were typically copper based donut profile types that one then torque the drain bolts to "crush" them down to the flat profile.

Now, on consecutive occasions first with my new Kawasaki, and now with the E, I find that the "crush" washers are actually flat aluminum washers. :? With the bike, I examined the used washers during my oil change and found no evidence of malforming/gouging or "crushing". I have since reused these for the last 2000 miles and so far, I have not seen any leaks. :shock: The Honda E washers look the same. So I am curious if anyone as any opinion about reusing these? I know, these are cheap to replace, but I am curious about their design and application. Any thoughts?

Peter
 

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They are made to compress and to comform to any irregularities in the bolt head or (more likely) oil pan/tranny case. Replace after each use.
That's what I thought, and I'll examine and compare the old and new washers when I change oil. My Kawasaki engine case and the drain bolt face must have good flatness, because I could absolutely not tell a used washer from a new one. :rolleyes:

Peter
 

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That's what I thought, and I'll examine and compare the old and new washers when I change oil. My Kawasaki engine case and the drain bolt face must have good flatness, because I could absolutely not tell a used washer from a new one. :rolleyes:

Peter
Sometimes one of my used crush washers still looks fine after use. I presume that is the case becuase I likely didnt torque them to spec (32 ftlb). The times I use a torque wrench, I almost always get a lip where the "crush" occured.
 

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Sometimes one of my used crush washers still looks fine after use. I presume that is the case becuase I likely didnt torque them to spec .
Yup.

Usually, if properly tightened, the washer will look "crushed," even if only a bit.

I have reused them in some applications where they still looked "un-crushed", but I didn't have a replacement handy. Even then after a time or two, they're shot and new ones are required.
 

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Sometimes one of my used crush washers still looks fine after use. I presume that is the case becuase I likely didnt torque them to spec (32 ftlb). The times I use a torque wrench, I almost always get a lip where the "crush" occured.
+1.

I have to admit that I've reused washers before because I ran out and didn't buy a new pack. I put a piece of cardboard underneath the pan one night and found it clean the next day, I think you're generally ok and can get away with 2x use in a pinch, but replace if possible.
 

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I've reused those, as well as the ones on the transmission and the differential, when I did not have the new ones around or simply was too lazy to get from under the car to go fetch one. So far all dry every time.
 
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