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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is how I converted a power adapter into a DIY hardwire kit. I did this for a PNI Wayfinder 6000, but these instructions should apply to any adapter or if you wish to add an power socket to your "E". Much thanks to Einstein and others for inspiration.

Note that you need some experience with a soldering iron, an ohmmeter and have some idea of how electricity works. Following this method will not void or hurt your "E". Caution is advised, however - soldering irons are hot, electricity (amps to be specific) can hurt, and shorting your electrical system can blow fuses - yours and the "E"s.

To start, here's the original power adapter:




Note that the +ve and -ve leads are marked. Check these for continuity with the ohmmeter and to make sure that they are correct. The button on the power adapter is the +ve lead, the legs on the side are the -ve lead. I cut off the coil of the power adapter cable. This left me with a more or less straight piece of wire with the power plug. I stripped the ends as so:



It's a bit hard to see, but in the above picture the +ve lead is red and the -ve lead is black - as per standards. On the other end of wire is the fuse tap. The one I used plugs into the fuse box beneath the steering wheel quite happily. I put in the rear power outlet socket. The original 15 amp fuse has its own socket, and the new connection got a 3 amp fuse. This fuse tap cost about $17 CAD with tax.



I had a four wire low voltage strip wire from which I took the white and green wires to leave the red and black wires. In this picture you can see how I soldered them to the power adapter wires:



The fuse tap has a crimp style connector that requires a heavier gauge of wire than I had, so I created a junction with this :



Here is the fuse tap crimped to my junction wire:



I soldered and taped up the junction wire so both ends look realtively clean as so:



I did a continuity test all throughout this to verify that I had good connections all of the way along. Having satisfied myself to this, I connected it up to the Wayfinder as so:



The wires tuck under the headliner and down the side of the "A" pillar. I did not want to pull the cover from the "A" pillar, so it shows a bit as it comes around the bottom of it:



The temperature probe goes through the door into the fender, and the power slips by by the side of the trim to go underneath where the fuse tap goes into the fuse box. I connected the -ve lead to the frame of the "E" - there are two large bolts underneath the steering wheel assembly. I loosened one and slid the -ve lead underneath it. Low amperage, so no need to run back to the battery.

The Wayfinder now lights up with the backlight when in the parking garage, and when it is dark. This is what it supposed to do when on the battery. All is good.

As I said in opening this message, this should work for any 12 volt power adapter. Some may have some extra circuitry in the socket end - you may want to take that end apart to check. Otherwise, this will allow you to connect any 12 volt device through the fuse box to save the power port. I am considering doing this for my nokia cell phone.

Have fun!
 

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Good instructions! I'll need these when I do upgrade my "alligator clips on the battery" setup ;)

A couple questions-

Exactly where in the fusebox did you connect it?

Did you try going down the other side of the A-pillar? I did, and as long as you keep the wires nice and flat you can slide them under the rubber molding without making the molding stick out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I connected it to the #2 fuse which is the rear power outlet. That seemed safe - to avoid unplugging anything that causes a trip to the dealer to be reset. Definitely will try your idea of running down the moulding especially as my power wire is flat.

I can't stop mod'ing my "E'!!! Is there a "Element Modifiers Anonymous" group I can join??? :lol:
 

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That A pillar cover comes off real easy, Isk. Just pull back the rubber seal at the top enough to get your fingers in and pull it out from the top (as if it is hinged at the bottom). Getting it back in is more of a hassle as you have to work the rubber seal on top of the pillar a bit at a time, but it's still easy.

I bet you already knew all this....but for others it might help hide wires.
 
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