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Discussion Starter #1
I think I got a Lemonment. In five months, my 2010 Element has refused to start without a jump five times. Also the key fob will not lock, only open. I've been to the dealer twice in two different states, where I have been assured in almost the same words, that I must be imagining things. "The fob works." Sure enough it did after the dealers checked it and for two days after. "We've checked the battery for a drain and all is well. You must have left a light on."
Not only am I left with a defective car, but I am left with a rotten feeling having been told I am imagining things.

Does anyone know what is going on? I can't help but think there is a memo from on high that gives instructions on how to handle the little customer since the exact thing happened at both dealers in the exact same way. I'm so disappointed in Honda.
 

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I have worked in dealerships for 40 years, and I have seen my share of problem new cars. Your problems are common in new cars, it is usually a backed out connector pin in a wiring harness. It will work part of the time. This is usually hard to find and takes a sharp tech to pull around on all of the harness connectors and inspect plug ends for bent of backed out pins. Good luck and stay on them to fix the car. Keep all of your paperwork from the dealership, you may have to bring up the lemon law if they keep stalling or don't find the problem.
 

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yes, keep good records and make sure you get a written explanation each time you get it back.
 

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this is what the lemon law is for.USE it. I did not see where you are from.but sounds like my local dealer, they dont know squat & want to charge for all warranty work, wso each time I tell them to put the peice of crap back togeather & start it I will do it my self.and then let everybody in the showroom & service dept know just how lame they are and it's all a scam. who knows how many cars I have kept from being sold at this honda dealer.and american honda was no help either .except for telling me that all of the work should of been warranty but they have no controal over thier dealers.:shock:
 

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As I said in an earlier post, keep good records try and keep a cool head with the service manager and the service advisor. Ask for a loaner car and leave your car for the service manager to drive and try and get it to act up. We dealership employees are human and should be treated like you want to be treated. acting like a nut case does not fix your car. If you can not get any answers ask to meet with the service rep. from Honda. They are the people that oversee the warranty process and give the dealer permission to repair the vehicle when normal troubleshooting does not work. If that does not work ask to have a meeting with the dealership owner (if you bought your car from the repairing dealer). If everything fails and they just don't know how to fix the car, you can follow the lemon law process (varies by state).
The quickest way to slow down the process is act like a fool and get into someones face. A good dealer wants you to be happy and come back. Good luck and I hope you get the problem fixed.
 

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As I said in an earlier post, keep good records try and keep a cool head with the service manager and the service advisor. Ask for a loaner car and leave your car for the service manager to drive and try and get it to act up. We dealership employees are human and should be treated like you want to be treated. acting like a nut case does not fix your car. If you can not get any answers ask to meet with the service rep. from Honda. They are the people that oversee the warranty process and give the dealer permission to repair the vehicle when normal troubleshooting does not work. If that does not work ask to have a meeting with the dealership owner (if you bought your car from the repairing dealer). If everything fails and they just don't know how to fix the car, you can follow the lemon law process (varies by state).
The quickest way to slow down the process is act like a fool and get into someones face. A good dealer wants you to be happy and come back. Good luck and I hope you get the problem fixed.
remember that word "a good dealer" It took me almost 6 or seven times to the dealer to figure that one out.if they cant keep thier lies straight or something dosent seem straight up or the tech dont know squat ,you might not of found a "good dealer" start your search again or file a claim. or it's now your turn to let the others know buyer beware !!! theres no service at this dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
As I said in an earlier post, keep good records try and keep a cool head with the service manager and the service advisor. Ask for a loaner car and leave your car for the service manager to drive and try and get it to act up. We dealership employees are human and should be treated like you want to be treated. acting like a nut case does not fix your car. If you can not get any answers ask to meet with the service rep. from Honda. They are the people that oversee the warranty process and give the dealer permission to repair the vehicle when normal troubleshooting does not work. If that does not work ask to have a meeting with the dealership owner (if you bought your car from the repairing dealer). If everything fails and they just don't know how to fix the car, you can follow the lemon law process (varies by state).
The quickest way to slow down the process is act like a fool and get into someones face. A good dealer wants you to be happy and come back. Good luck and I hope you get the problem fixed.

I'm with you on this. Have always been in service industries and treat everyone like I want to be treated, and pull out all the nice when there is a real problem. I get upgraded more than anyone I know in hotels and airlines. Nice works and Nice is right.
 
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