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Discussion Starter #1
I plan on doing my first oil change on my new "E" this weekend and i was wondering what size drain plug gasket im suppose to use. my owners manual dont say so i figure someone on here could help me. I have a 2006 EX-P model.
 

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If you can...pick up a couple at the dealer. I typically pick up 5 filters and about a dozen gaskets (I use them on my Civics with the the WIX filters)
 

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you should replace every oil change, just a crush washer, just a couple cents.
If you keep using a crush washer over again it will deform and may not seal as well as it may also allow your drain plug to come loose (rare, but possible). few cents is worth it in my book.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks for the answer to my question ramblerdan. i wasnt sure what size i was suppose to use. i knew it had to be changed after every oil change just didnt know the size.
 

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Hello there. I changed the oil on our 2004 Element this past weekend. I went to the Honda dealer to get the OE crush washers. I put the new washer (14MM, part number 94109-14000) on the oil drain plug and was immediately confused. Could someone please explain to me the thinking Honda used in making a crush gasket that has a smaller outer diameter than the drain plug itself. The OD of the oil drain plug is 0.960 inches (about 15.4/16ths) while the OD of the Honda crush washer gasket is 0.860 inches (about 13.8/16ths). If you subtract the two numbers, you have a crush washer gasket that is about 1.6/16ths smaller in OD. This is almost 1/8 inch lost in sealing area surface. I realize this is not a pressurized connection, but this is poorly done from a sealing perspective. On this diameter, if you grind the numbers, this turns out to be a 25% loss in sealing area.

It would be great if folks could fill me in. Thank you.
 

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Hi,
Ok, here is why you want to change the crush washer everytime.

The threads in these oil pans are alloy and the bolt is steel.

After awhile usung the sane washer the torque goes to the threads instead of the washer and guess what?

The threads can't take it and come out like the zip top on a can of oil treatment.

Here's a vid on where some of you are heading...Take notes, your gonna need them!:rolleyes:

 

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Yes, thank you very much for the reply. I understand the importance of changing the crush washer gasket. However, that is not the question I asked. I asked specifically about the differences in the Honda oil drain plug OD versus the Honda oil drain plug washer gasket OD.
 

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Hi,
As was suggested, I would get them at the Dealer.

You might also want to get 3 quarts of tranny fluid if you have an A/T with the washer for that.

I drop and replace 3 quarts every year, fluid is cheap, trannys not so much?

 

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I'm pretty sure the pan is steel. The smaller surface area of the crush washer actually increases the compressive stress that crushes the washer which tends to make the washer conform to the surface of the pan and the underside of the plug to effect a seal. This probably improves the sealing rather than spreading the load over a large area. The issue with reusing the washer is that crushing it tends to work harden it, so the next time, it doesn't yield so it may not seal as well; that's when people will continue to crank on the plug to stop a leak and end up stripping the threads in the pan.
 

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fleetw00d,

Thanks for your response. However, the larger the sealing area, the better the seal. The force is spread over a longer "path" if you will to prevent a leak from occurring. I do not believe for a second that a higher force over a smaller area is needed for the oil pan plug (a non pressurized connection). Having said this, you would want to make the sealing area of the crush gasket the same as the sealing area of the plug itself. The thinking here is that it will take a lower force on the oil pan threads to prevent a leak from occurring. So with a larger sealing area, the tendency towards an overtightened connection is lessened, providing that a new "elastic" crush washer gasket is used. I still do not have an answer to my question.
 

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Yes, a larger area washer spreads the load, but this reduces the stress in the aluminum washer. Too much area and it will take a larger load and more torque on the drain plug to "crush" and yield the washer into any asperities in the surfaces to create the seal.
 

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shdrazba, fleetw00d is 100% correct, and about the hardening of working the aluminum. So to answer your question the OD of the washer, if it were bigger & matched the bolt flange OD it would not seal better with the same torque spec as the washer with the smaller OD.
 
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