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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Element DUI Encounter

Dinner
It happened on the way home from Richelle’s annual holiday office dinner party.
We arrived at the Ritz Carltons’s “Jer–ne” restaurant and bar in Marina Del Rey at 6:00 PM to greet other guests.
Pre dinner co_ktail hour was at 6:30 with dinner scheduled at 7:30.
Due to congested Friday night traffic some guests didn’t actually arrive until nearer to 8:00.
So from 6:00 until 8:00 we munched on delectable orderves and luscious mixed drinks from our party’s private candle festooned observation deck overlooking the beautiful marina.
During this time I consumed three very large and deliciously strong Mai Tais.
Finally all of the invited guests had arrived and we moved into the dinning room where endless bottles of fine wines were poured.

The dinner was fabulous!

First Course: Green apple, bacon, crusted vinaigrette, point reyes blue cheese mousse salad
Main Course: Chilean Sea Bass, boutique mushroom, spring leek coulis, truffle potato puree.
Dessert: Citrus crème brulee, gingered raspberry sorbet, vanilla crisp.

By 9:00 PM we switched to coffee which was served in minature porcelain cups from personal french presses.
We left to go home at 10:30, by that time I had consumed a least three of these strong coffees.

THE DUI CHECKPOINT:

On our way home we decided to take a short cut and after routing on some local side streets - we rolled directly into a DUI Checkpoint on Washington Blvd. OMG!

At first, we had no idea what was going on and thought that we were driving towards the scene of a bad accident.
It wasn’t until we went by the MADD trailer parked in the middle of Washington Blvd that we figured out what was going on.
By then it was too late.

Uniformed police officers routed us and a dozen other vehicles through a maze of orange traffic cone lanes close to the sidewalk.
At least a dozen Black and Whites were parked at curb side angles facing the street.
On the sidewalk stunned people stood around with “I’m getting busted for DUI” looks on their faces.
The cops were everywhere and people were being “snagged, tagged and bagged ” wholesale.

Eventually Miss Ellie made it to the front of the line, where an officer was directing some cars through and pointing at others to park it on the right.

Then it was my time to step up to the plate. (remember the Cowardly Lion when he first met the Wizard of Oz?)
The officer smiled at me and asked for my license which I fumble but eventually found.
I was then asked if I still lived at the address on the license which I said I did.
Then he asked me if I had anything to drink tonight.
Of course I said no.
If I had said yes I am sure that I would have been given the standard sobriety test.
The officer then handed my license back and wished me a good evening.
I was greatly relieved.

Could I of passed the sobriety test?
I dunno – I wasn’t buzzed (or at least I didn’t think I was) and felt level headed enough, but who knows?
A friend of mine who works in a SoCal law firm gave me some (alleged) pointers on what not to do at a DUI Checkpoint.

*When instructed to put your index finger on the tip of your nose; extend your arm straight out in front of you at shoulder level, then bend your elbow without lowering your arm and your index finger will land squarely on the tip of your nose.

* When asked by an officer to follow his finger with your eyes from left to right – do not move your head from left to right – only your eyes.

* If all else fails and your gonna be busted for DUI don't take a breath test. Instead request a blood test - it usually takes more than a few hours to set that up and by then alcohol levels will lower.

Wether or not those DUI tips from my lawyer friend would of helped is unknown. Fortunately for me I didn't get to try them out.
All in all my DUI encounter was a very freaky and stressful experience. I was very lucky and I know it!

Needless to say a DUI will cost you plenty in time, money and grief.
So be careful during the holiday party season.
DUI Checkpoints are out there and you only need to get busted once for your life to go all to hell.
 

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I am glad to hear that the checkpoint didn't give you any problems.

I was stopped last year while I was on my boat and given a field sobriety test on my boat at the entrance of the marina/no wake zone. Very stressful but luckily I passed the breath test after all of the stupid field test that the officers throw at you. What made it worse was it was just my father-in-law, his mother-in-law(85+ years old) and me going back for the day. It just so happened that my registration sticker was from out of state so it was a red flag for the officers to inspect things. I was also carting the garbage from my brother-in-laws pontoon to the dumpster for him which he used to use those cheap see through white bags and you could see the beer cans in it.:mad:
 

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Careful about that legal advice. The law is different in Canada about refusing to give a breath sample and it may be different in other American jurisdictions as well. Plus the R.C.M.P. routinely use roadside testers here (at least in B.C.) rather than sobriety tests to initially screen drivers that are stopped at road checks.
 

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When I was 22 years old, my buddies and I were coming back from the bar when we rolled into a DUI check point. When the cop leaned into the window and asked did I have anything to drink, the first thing I did was grab an old prescription bottle I had laying in my car and say "no officer, I'm on medication and I am the designated driver". He smiled and waved us through. I don't even know why I had the bottle in my car but I left it in the car for a long time. Not that I condone drinking and driving but this did save my butt when I was young and reckless.

In NJ if you refuse the breath test you automatically loose your license for a certain period of time. Most people don't know it, but in the fine print on the NJ license when you sign it (which you must do to make it legal) you are signing that you will take the breath test when asked or loose you license as a penalty.
 

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Which is worse? Losing your licsense for refusing a sobriety test or losing your licsense for DUI. Here it's 6 mos suspension either way. I'm not condoning just stating a fact.:neutral:
 

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One night, on a long, late haul back from visiting my future wife and her family, I rolled right into a checkpoint. Seen the thing from a ways back, unfortunately its in a town built on an island, and that section of highway was the only way I had to get home. No worries, I haven't been drinkin.. just a little tired.

So I pull up to the front and roll down the window.
Mr. Officer: Hi I'm Officer so-and-so with the CHP and we're conducting a sobriety checkpoint here on highway 12... have you had anything to drink tonight.
Me: *raising up my half-full Coke bottle* no sir, just heading home and keeping the sugar levels up...
Mr. Officer: *stern look* That's good...but isn't that where you're supposed to put the rum?
Me: *nervously*...ha....ha...ha......no?
Mr. Officer: *evil grin/chuckle* Have a good night sir, and keep it safe...

Lesson learned? Don't show a bottle of any type in the vehicle, it can be construed one way or the other as impairing your abilities...and....

Drink rum and cokes!! They are oh so tastay!! :lol:
 

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Given this is a military law case..not applicable to most of you.

Back on the carrier I was one of several officers who were designated to serve as Summary Court Martial officers. Its a unique procedure whereby the officer serves as judge and jury.

Most of the cases I heard were DUI's on base (off base it was the local police's jurisdiction). If a defendant plead not guilty, I would walk the dog on the entire process. Go back to the security office and reveiw the log book for the breath analyzer machine to ensure it was in calibration (including if the sample used for calibration was not expired). I'd review the "receipt" the machine produced with had the BAC on it and the time it was issues. Then I'd look at the logbook to see how much time transpired between traffic stop and breath test. The navy standard was a 20-minute wait to illiminate "mouth alcohol" which might give an aritificially high reading.

Probably two guys out of a couple dozen cases I heard got off because the process was not carried out in every step or the machine was out of calibration.
 

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Which is worse? Losing your licsense for refusing a sobriety test or losing your licsense for DUI. Here it's 6 mos suspension either way. I'm not condoning just stating a fact.
Today 04:29 PM


In NJ (1st offense) it is a 1 year loss for DUI and only 6 months (I believe) for refusing. So yes you get off easier for refusing but still have to thumb it for six months.
 

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Which is worse? Losing your licsense for refusing a sobriety test or losing your licsense for DUI. Here it's 6 mos suspension either way. I'm not condoning just stating a fact.
Today 04:29 PM


In NJ (1st offense) it is a 1 year loss for DUI and only 6 months (I believe) for refusing. So yes you get off easier for refusing but still have to thumb it for six months.
I doubt that is the case in most jurisdictions - they certainly don't want to encourage people to refuse valid breath demands.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Careful about that legal advice. The law is different in Canada about refusing to give a breath sample and it may be different in other American jurisdictions as well. Plus the R.C.M.P. routinely use roadside testers here (at least in B.C.) rather than sobriety tests to initially screen drivers that are stopped at road checks.
Indeed. At next year's Holiday Dinner Party we'll book a standard room at Ritz for $350.
From what I understand a DUI in California is expensive - in the $10,000 range for fines, and attorney fees.
Not to mention license restrictions, AA meetings and god know's what else.

PS: Just so youze knows...
I had three drinks and small half glass of wine between 6:00 and 9:00 PM.
After that, three coffees and numerous glasses of Pelligrino water.
It was near 11:00 PM when I got to the DUI checkpoint.
I am very confident that I was not buzzed and sure that I would of passed a field sobriety test.
If I thought I was remotely over the legal limit I most certainly would not of driven.
 

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drinking and driving is one of the stupidist things you can do. my sister almost got killed by a drunk who ran a red light. with that said, everyone makes mistakes but most of these checkpoints, atleast in my town are announced publically and are easy to avoid if you know where they are. best solution is a cab ride home if you live close enough or a cheap hotel if you dont.
 

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The whole thing is messed up.

It certainly makes the case for better public transportation. When I lived in Chicago Near the "L" I used to meet my buddies out at the bar. I would take the "L" to get there... bad thing... the Orange line shut down at 11:00 P.M.

So I either bumed a ride from one of my less than sober buddies or paid for a taxi.

As the years progressed they decided to let the Orange line run to 1:00 A.M. By that time I was older and didn't drink nearly as much.

A better infrastructure of Public transportation would certainly lessen the chances that people would take the risk at all.

If cops wanted to bust people for DUI they would park outside bars and get people as the drove out of the parking lot. The whole thing doesn't make any sense.:twisted::twisted:
 

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The dinner was fabulous!

First Course: Green apple, bacon, crusted vinaigrette, point reyes blue cheese mousse salad
Main Course: Chilean Sea Bass, boutique mushroom, spring leek coulis, truffle potato puree.
Dessert: Citrus crème brulee, gingered raspberry sorbet, vanilla crisp.
.
Damn, where does Richelle work? All I get for 'holiday' parties at my jobs are the Costco specials or cheap bar food! :rolleyes: and after two mai tais I'd be sound asleep under a table :D
 

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Discussion Starter #18
If cops wanted to bust people for DUI they would park outside bars and get people as the drove out of the parking lot. The whole thing doesn't make any sense.:twisted::twisted:
Yesterday a friend from Oregon told me that it's illegal for the police to do that. At least in Oregon anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Damn, where does Richelle work? All I get for 'holiday' parties at my jobs are the Costco specials or cheap bar food! :rolleyes: and after two mai tais I'd be sound asleep under a table :D
LOL. Her boss goes all out for these end of the year partys.
We used to do these dinners along with the theater.
Got to see some splendid musicals and plays.
But times are tougher now and these days it's only the dinner.

Seriously - a night on the town like this is way out of our financial range.
Which is why we look forward to them every year.
There's been 15 so far.
Next year I bet we could get you on the guest list.
 

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Yesterday a friend from Oregon told me that it's illegal for the police to do that. At least in Oregon anyway.
It's also illegal in Washington State and has been since the 1980s when it was struck down by the state supreme court as unconstitutional. Our governor tried unsuccessfully bring them back earlier this year. Sobriety Checkpoint Laws lists each state and whether they have them.
 
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