Honda Element Owners Club banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So we just got hit yesterday in Portland with an unexpected 2" - 5" of snow and boy was it a mess out on the roads. (dang weatherman can't get anything right) My typical 10 min drive home from work took me 3 1/2 hours to drive. If I owned any other car I honestly think it would have taken twice as long or would have abandoned my car like half the other sh*ts that just left their cars in the middle of the road and walked off. Well luckily I own an Element and didn't have a problem getting around at all :) I was passing jeeps, suburbans, subbys, and many, many other cars that have 4 wheel drive. I was so amazed how many people in oregon do not know how to drive in the snow. I was driving up 40 degree hills navigating the west hills of Portland to bypass most of the traffic. If I could rate my element yesterday I would give it 6 stars out of a 5 star rating. This was also the first time I had the chance to try out my new tires, (yoks, avid 4 vs) these tires did awesome and I have no complaints. I was a little nervous when I first saw the snow coming down at work and was thinking how my element would handle in the snow with the new tires, but everything was "AMAZING" and made it home safely without any dings, dents, or scratches. The reason it did take so long to get home was because all the city buses were not prepared for the snow and almost all the trimet buses were sideways blocking all car lanes on every main artery going out of the city. This caused all the traffic to get backed upped and you had to wait in line to slowly get by. So, if any lesson is learned here, don't trust the weatherman, make sure you have good tires, be patience when driving with other dumb*sses and own a Honda Element to get you home safely!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
I'm always dumbfounded by asshats that live in the areas that get snow year after year and STILL don't know how to drive in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Mess is right!

Nextgenxx,

I got off work at 4:30, needed to get downtown from where I was (across the Ross Island Bridge) to pick up Mrs CoolE (4 miles) then back across the RIB down Powell to home (10 miles). 14 miles total. It took us 4 hours and 15 minutes. Fortunately we got new shoes just a couple of months ago also, and we also were maneurving easily (when we actually could, of course) around abandoned cars and caddy-wompus busses. Funny thing - one of my co-workers came back from lunch about 1:15, walks into the office, and says it smells like snow outside! 2 hours later, it is! She called it better than any of the weatherpersons did.

Once we did get home, we tucked the E safely into the garage, and then grabbed the F350 to go get gas and hit Freddies (had some HSA money to burn before the end of the year). By then of course all the numbskulls had either abandoned their cars or made it home and were not going back out. Pretty much had the store to ourselves, and no, I did not put the truck in 4wd either. It wasn't that bad, if you took your time, and used common sense. But hey-this is the left coast-it's a given that there is a lack of common sense.:grin:

CoolE'sRule

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,263 Posts
So we just got hit yesterday in Portland with an unexpected 2" - 5" of snow and boy was it a mess out on the roads. (dang weatherman can't get anything right)....
Although the National Weather Service had predicted snow to stay at the west end of the Columbia River Gorge late Tuesday, forecasters admitted they were caught flat-footed by the failure of entrenched cold air to clear out.

"There was a whole host of scenarios that could have played out, and we went with the most likely," said Steve Starmer, a weather service forecaster. "It didn't work out that way because the cold air didn't scour out as fast as we thought."
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/index.ssf/2009/12/unexpected_snow_storm_slows_we.html

I have learned from a weather blog by a UW professor, that predicting the dividing line between snow and rain can tricky, since just a few degrees can make all the difference. Often in the winter precipitation starts as snow, but melts as it gets into warmer air close to the ground. In some cases, that melting ends up cooling the air (since it draws heat out of the air) enough that the rain turns to snow. Predicting snow and ice in Portland is complicated by the fact that cold air may, or may not, reach the city via the Gorge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,238 Posts
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/index.ssf/2009/12/unexpected_snow_storm_slows_we.html

I have learned from a weather blog by a UW professor, that predicting the dividing line between snow and rain can tricky, since just a few degrees can make all the difference. Often in the winter precipitation starts as snow, but melts as it gets into warmer air close to the ground. In some cases, that melting ends up cooling the air (since it draws heat out of the air) enough that the rain turns to snow. Predicting snow and ice in Portland is complicated by the fact that cold air may, or may not, reach the city via the Gorge.

Funny, the weather people here say it's the ocean and mountains that makes predicting weather in this area almost impossible. Must be because we don't have a Gorge! I think they all have an excuse. All I know is, that If I was wrong as many times a year in my job, as they are, I would get FIRED !

Dom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
I lived in and around Seattle for 20 years and had the same thing to deal with anytime it snowed. People panic at the mere mention of snow. All it takes is common sense and patience. And you don't necessarily need 4WD, although that helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,263 Posts
Funny, the weather people here say it's the ocean and mountains that makes predicting weather in this area almost impossible. ...
Here Cliff Mass compares east and west coast storms
http://cliffmass.blogspot.com/2009/12/coastal-storms.html

Elsewhere he has complained that we (on the west coast) need coastal radar, to better see what is coming from the west. On the east coast there is a lot of data about storms coming overland from the west.

Around Seattle the mountains have a significant impact on weather. For example to the west there's the Olympic Range. Weather systems from the west flow around this, to the north and south. When those winds meet on the west side of the mountains, they produce a convergence zone - an west-east zone just north of Seattle that gets more precipitation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,689 Posts
in San Diego, you can predict today's weather, being accurate about 80% of the time, by just using the weather report for yesterday. <grin>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
I lived in and around Seattle for 20 years and had the same thing to deal with anytime it snowed. People panic at the mere mention of snow. All it takes is common sense and patience. And you don't necessarily need 4WD, although that helps!
4WD around St Louis generally means that you can go that much faster in the snow and ice before you crash into something! These people around here are just about as bad as those in Washington, D.C. when I was stationed there.

I have never seen so many people with SUVs and other AWD vehicles spun off the road and when I drove past the same area, I couldn't see anything on the road that would cause it.

Both the E and the Ridgeline have been rock steady so far this season. We just have to watch out for the "other guy"!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top