Honda Element Owners Club banner

21 - 40 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
I don't like the idea of this valve. Why? For one, debris on the road ( ice, snow, road kill, etc ) can possibly open the valve. Sure it is a long shot but not a chance I am willing to take. Second, slow drain, besides taking more time, mean less contaminants coming from the engine and oil pan. A fast drain will remove more of these.

I use my garage and drive way all the time for all 4 of my cars. Buy some ramps. It only takes 30 seconds. There is easy access and the engine is tilted up and back so the oil drains faster. :D

As for burning your hand, I let the plug fall into the top of my oil container
( not pan), let it drain for 20-30 minutes. By then the oil is in the container and the plug is sitting next to the drain hole. EASY and no burns !

I say NO to the valve IMO..........

The position and location of the Fumoto is probably impossible for anything to hit it while you are moving. It would have to wrap around and behind the oil pan while in motion, I am going to say near impossible. If you have ever had one you know they are not easily opened. Many distributors also sell a clamp to ensure accidental opening is impossible. The drainage time is negligible and I doubt that more contaminants are left behind. A characteristic of oil is to suspend the impurities, I doubt there is a pile of crap sitting at the bottom of the pan that needs to be worked out. That is what an oil filter is for and if the car was just running, there wouldn't be any settling time anyway.

Maybe you are a traditionalist and that is fine, but no need to have irrational fears (not one reported Fumoto failure) and spread potential misinformation (oil contaminants). I have changed my oil with the regular screw, what magical technique do you use to prevent the oil from touching you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,733 Posts
If the valve came installed as standard equipment I don't believe there would be a debate about removing it.

The manufacturer suggests that if the valve is installed in a location where it is likely to be accidentally opened by road debris, then put a hose clamp around it. It's a legitimate concern, but one that was addressed by Honda engineers when they opted to put the drain plug on the back side of the oil pan instead of the bottom. Either way hitting a rock could gash the oil pan.

Why is anyone listening to complaints from people who have made up their minds not to buy something? I'd rather hear a discussion about solutions to the oil filter location. Changing it in a driveway is messier and more awkward than pulling the drain plug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,038 Posts
every time i go to get my oil changed, i drip oil (my mom does too) for 3-5 days after. would this drain valve cut off the drips? i havent seen where they come from, but im going to assume its dripping from where this valve goes.

anyone have this problem before?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,234 Posts
every time i go to get my oil changed, i drip oil (my mom does too) for 3-5 days after. would this drain valve cut off the drips? i havent seen where they come from, but im going to assume its dripping from where this valve goes.

anyone have this problem before?
It's not the drain plug.

When the filter is removed oil goes everywhere. It's a small amount but just a little oil spill looks like a flood. There is not much you can do about it other than try to blot the oil from the side of the engine block and axle which sits right below the filter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,753 Posts
every time i go to get my oil changed, i drip oil (my mom does too) for 3-5 days after. would this drain valve cut off the drips? i havent seen where they come from, but im going to assume its dripping from where this valve goes.

anyone have this problem before?
Go to the H&A Website and under Maintenance purchase this little item... It will cut down on all of the dripping oil problems you're having.

Oil Deflector





Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,733 Posts
I've changed my filter at lest 10 times and never had a problem with excessive dripping. Like most simple things it takes longer to describe my technique than to execute it.

Basically, if you allow the oil to drain completely, the only oil in the filter will be on the bottom side between the can perimeter and the holes around the perimeter of the oil inlet. The trick is to unscrew the filter rapidly, immediately hold it with the inlet pointed straight up and remove it in the same orientation. Without a lift it's not easy to lower the filter without turning it sideways. Some people have used a plastic bag to capture the filter before lowering it. I don't have good enough one-handed dexterity to close the bag and lower it without dropping it.

In the case of the Element, you have a nearly clear straight shot down the back of the engine in which you could remove the filter -- if your arms were long enough and you didn't mind laying on the engine. I'm not limber enough or well enough coordinated to do that so I came up with a variation.

When the oil is drained, put the drain bolt back in with a new sealing washer. Break the seal between the old oil filter and the engine by turning the filter 1/4-1/2 turn. Look at the support member where the photo has that over-designed splash shield shown. You'll see that it has a lip formed to allow oil to flow down it. Put a pan under that as insurance. You probably won't need it.

Take a new filter and examine it. Take a wire coat hanger or similar piece of heavy stiff wire and form a hook on it that can pass through the inlet and catch inside the used filter. Position the wire so that the hook is slightly above the old filter and anchor the other end so that it is secure. I use a piece of plastic pipe or a broomstick laid across the top of the engine.

Have a half dozen paper towels ready in case you fumble the filter removal. RAPIDLY unscrew the old filter taking care to not drop it. Immediately position it inlet side up and hook it onto the wire. Use the paper towels to wipe down any drips on the side of the engine and the cross member. Get out from under the car and carefully lift out the old filter.

At this point you should have a drip-free engine ready for the new filter. If you fumbled badly and dropped the filter, use some more towels to clean up. Practice makes better.

I normally use ramps, but last time changed the filter by sliding under the car. It took longer because of the awkward position to get a wrench in place to break the seal and torque the new filter, but the result was the same - no drips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
Maybe you are a traditionalist and that is fine, but no need to have irrational fears (not one reported Fumoto failure) and spread potential misinformation (oil contaminants). I have changed my oil with the regular screw, what magical technique do you use to prevent the oil from touching you?
No fears here. I don't use it. I just figure why invite possible trouble when my method of unscrewing the plug is easy and no big deal.

I loosen the plug with a wrench. Then unscrew it with a socket and extension. Somtimes the plug stays in the socket, sometimes it falls on the top of my oil container. Either way, no burned skin.

As for minimizing the "dripping after a oil change", I use foil and this home made oil pan....works for me it is very cheap...........
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,038 Posts
its not a flood, its just a little drip that probably drips 2 or 3 times a day, but it does that for a few days. i will look into that product
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
its not a flood, its just a little drip that probably drips 2 or 3 times a day, but it does that for a few days. i will look into that product
Just wipe the parts that are under the oil filter. If that doesn't work, the filter isn't tight enough. That part isn't necessary but will help limit the splattering. If you take it somewhere, make sure the lazy folks wipe it down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I'm a die-hard Fumoto valve fan - been using one on my PowerStroke for 10+ years. I've never been concerned with the theoretical possibility of the valve opening, even when off-roading.

Still, the image below posted earlier shows why I won't use the Fumoto on my E. Doing so, prevents you from draining all of the oil, as the threads from the valve block the last bit of oil coming out. And, it's not an insignificant amount.

I just finished up my first oil change on the E, and after removing the drain plug I quickly swapped in the Fumoto valve I had purchased while the oil was still draining. I opened the valve and let the remainder of the oil drain, giving it enough time so it wasn't dripping at all.

Then, I removed the Fumoto valve. Quite a bit more oil drained out. I didn't measure it, but it was far more than a few drops - a slow and steady stream continued for a couple minutes. Wouldn't surprise me if it was 1/4 cup or so.

On my Ford, this doesn't happen - the drain is not angled back as it is on the E, it points straight down.

Those of you with Fumotos, might want to remove them after your next change to see if you are comfortable with the amount of oil remaining in the pan.

[/QUOTE]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Which part #?

I've been shopping around for a Fumoto drain valve for a 2010 Element EX. None of the dealers can say for 100% sure that the F-106 is the correct part# for this vehicle. They all say that the 2010's are not listed as of yet.

Can anyone verify this as the correct part#? No extension fitting needed?

Also: Anyone ever dealt with these people? They are listing these valves significantly cheaper than what I've been able to find at other dealers. I'm getting quotes of $37.95 at 2 other places. $22.95 seems like a 'knock-off' price. No? http://www.qwikvalve.com/Vehicle-Chart.html?id=21
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I was tempted to get one of these as its well made and works as advertised. But I figure if I have to get under the car anyway, undoing the pan bolt is pretty fast. Besides, I'm one of those that like the old oil to gush as fast as possible.

ps. still using the original drain bolt "crush washer" and havn't lost a drop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
I got one and do not regret it at all... don't have to jack up just reach under from the front, takes no time at all to drain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Fumoto 106N

The N stands for nipple. I just installed a Fumoto oil drain valve this weekend. The quality seems very nice and I am glad that it oriented nicely when tightened. That is the opening lever is on top, the manufacturer says it doesn't matter but I'd rather it be up. Install was a breeze and a test drain of about a quart of oil showed a fine flow speed, just a little slower. But that does prevent the usual splash of oil as the regular drain plug slips from your fingers on the last turn, that's reason enough for getting this valve. I'm usually doing multiple maintenance items at a time and in no rush so letting the oil drain for a while is not an issue. The nipple is pretty long, and after valve is open and closed there are a few drops of what's left in the end that drip out. Changing oil will surely be easier with the Fumoto, if only the E's oil filter were less of a mess to change, even with the special magnetic oil diverter tray it's still pretty messy. I'll be keeping an eye on the new valve for leaks and such, not anticipating any problems. Hope no body reaches down there and opens my valve!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,274 Posts
I have this on two of my other cars and they're awesome. The E didn't get one because I was worried about a rock or something breaking it off, while off road.
 
21 - 40 of 40 Posts
Top