Honda Element Owners Club banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just got back from 60 mile round trip in the pouring rain with the '07' SC. Now, I'm afraid to drive this thing in the rain again because the OEM GoodYear tires have got to be the WORSE TIRES EVER!

They spin so easily it's difficult to leave a stop light without spinning the tires half way through 2nd gear. They seem to have no wet grip whatsoever.

Scary to even think about a panic stop or evasive manuver.

Lots of tread on these Goodyears but there getting replaced ASAP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,238 Posts
Wow I have never been told that before !

This thread holds some info! See post 97 .

Or this one post 7

Dom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,181 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Goodyears on my 2010 new Element SC and here at 2200 miles one is already leaking, maybe little nail or something. Shortest I have ever gone on a tire that's for sure. Hope one of these Goodyear retailers lives up to the warranty and I get a new one put on at no charge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Just got back from 60 mile round trip in the pouring rain with the '07' SC. Now, I'm afraid to drive this thing in the rain again because the OEM GoodYear tires have got to be the WORSE TIRES EVER!

They spin so easily it's difficult to leave a stop light without spinning the tires half way through 2nd gear. They seem to have no wet grip whatsoever.

Scary to even think about a panic stop or evasive manuver.

Lots of tread on these Goodyears but there getting replaced ASAP.
Good Year doesn't make a round tire. And believe it or not, that quote came from the goodyear service center in the great white north :)
 

·
Registered
2008 Element EX AWD
Joined
·
2,829 Posts
Lead foot + OEM Goodyear tires = unhappy driver.

VROOM, SCREECH, VROOM, SCREECH, VROOM, SCREECH, SCREEEECH, CRASH! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Lead foot + OEM Goodyear tires = unhappy driver.

VROOM, SCREECH, VROOM, SCREECH, VROOM, SCREECH, SCREEEECH, CRASH! :)
Haha. The term, "lead foot", and Honda Element should never appear in the same sentence.

You're joking right?
 

·
Registered
2008 Element EX AWD
Joined
·
2,829 Posts
Haha. The term, "lead foot", and Honda Element should never appear in the same sentence. You're joking right?
You're right, but "lead foot" and "driver" should also never appear in any passenger vehicle.

I was explaining to the OP the primary cause for his complaint that "They spin so easily it's difficult to leave a stop light without spinning the tires half way through 2nd gear. They seem to have no wet grip whatsoever. "

The Element has more than sufficient acceleration, and a lot of low end torque, so the primary cause of tire spinning during acceleration is a lead footed driver.

Unfortunately, hard acceleration is too often accompanied by speeding, tail gating, frequent lane changing, hard braking, and complaints about other drivers and inadequate horns. :roll: These are characteristics of unskilled or aggressive drivers. Aggressive driving has no place on the public roads, it should be confined to closed circuit race tracks.

I drove more than 40K miles on the OEM Goodyears, never had a problem with merging into traffic without chirping the tires, never had a problem with adequate traction or handling in rain or snow. I was able to avoid several emergent collisions directly in front of me by hard braking and steering. If the tread hadn't worn out, I'd still have them. I changed to a different tire primarily because the OEM Goodyear was more expensive than another tire that was optimized for highway touring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
[/QUOTE]
Unfortunately, hard acceleration is too often accompanied by speeding, tail gating, frequent lane changing, hard braking, and complaints about other drivers and inadequate horns. :roll: These are characteristics of unskilled or aggressive drivers. [/QUOTE]

Also leads to complaints about what bad miliage these cars get or disbelief of the claims of some posters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,234 Posts
I drove more than 40K miles on the OEM Goodyears, never had a problem with merging into traffic without chirping the tires, never had a problem with adequate traction or handling in rain or snow. I was able to avoid several emergent collisions directly in front of me by hard braking and steering. If the tread hadn't worn out, I'd still have them. I changed to a different tire primarily because the OEM Goodyear was more expensive than another tire that was optimized for highway touring.
Me too. I have absolutely no problem with my stock Goodyears. They work in snow and rain and seem to be wearing quite well. Over the last 48 years I've owned a bunch of different cars and have tried a bunch of different brands of tires and I have to say that this is the first set of Goodyear tires that I have no issues with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,238 Posts
You're right, but "lead foot" and "driver" should also never appear in any passenger vehicle.

I was explaining to the OP the primary cause for his complaint that "They spin so easily it's difficult to leave a stop light without spinning the tires half way through 2nd gear. They seem to have no wet grip whatsoever. "

The Element has more than sufficient acceleration, and a lot of low end torque, so the primary cause of tire spinning during acceleration is a lead footed driver.

Unfortunately, hard acceleration is too often accompanied by speeding, tail gating, frequent lane changing, hard braking, and complaints about other drivers and inadequate horns. :roll: These are characteristics of unskilled or aggressive drivers. Aggressive driving has no place on the public roads, it should be confined to closed circuit race tracks.

I drove more than 40K miles on the OEM Goodyears, never had a problem with merging into traffic without chirping the tires, never had a problem with adequate traction or handling in rain or snow. I was able to avoid several emergent collisions directly in front of me by hard braking and steering. If the tread hadn't worn out, I'd still have them. I changed to a different tire primarily because the OEM Goodyear was more expensive than another tire that was optimized for highway touring.

Sorry

I have to take Issue with your statement. The wife and I are over 60 years old. Led foot may apply to me, but never to her. I have been in my E behind her in her E, and have seen her spin the tires from a stop light. I also spun the fronts at the same light when I pulled away. Then I saw her slide sideways turning at the same light. I promptly did the same dammed thing. The Tires came off our E's in short order. We replaced them. They were Junk, Trash, $hit, donuts that don't belong on a wheelbarrow!
That's putting it mildly!

I understand that some people have had no issues at all with the tire. It may be the roads here in the East are worn down and offer less traction. It may be that different production runs of the same tire are better than the 2 sets we got. ( I don't believe that though ) Funny thing is, The adverse unpredictable handling went away with the installation of new tires. So if it was in fact the drivers fault, then changing tires must also change, some 50 years worth of old driving habits.

Good luck with your theory .

Dom
 

·
Registered
2008 Element EX AWD
Joined
·
2,829 Posts
Sorry

I have to take Issue with your statement. The wife and I are over 60 years old. Led foot may apply to me, but never to her. I have been in my E behind her in her E, and have seen her spin the tires from a stop light. I also spun the fronts at the same light when I pulled away. Then I saw her slide sideways turning at the same light. I promptly did the same dammed thing. The Tires came off our E's in short order. We replaced them. They were Junk, Trash, $hit, donuts that don't belong on a wheelbarrow!
That's putting it mildly!

I understand that some people have had no issues at all with the tire. It may be the roads here in the East are worn down and offer less traction. It may be that different production runs of the same tire are better than the 2 sets we got. ( I don't believe that though ) Funny thing is, The adverse unpredictable handling went away with the installation of new tires. So if it was in fact the drivers fault, then changing tires must also change, some 50 years worth of old driving habits.

Good luck with your theory .

Dom
Sorry, Dom, but I stand by my statement that "These are characteristics of unskilled or aggressive drivers."

"Lead foot" refers to trying to accelerate or brake faster than necessary or can be done safely. You don't have to be an aggressive driver to exhibit a lead foot occasionally. My personal "Mr. Myogi" driving instructor taught me to imagine that there was an egg between my right foot and the pedal. Unless you are on ice, from a standing stop there's no reason for that egg to ever be broken - for your tires to chirp.

Combined years of driving don't double a drivers experience or skills. Some old habits aren't necessarily relevant or appropriate under today's conditions. As an example, my wife and I are also over 60, and she has more years of driving experience than I, but her skills and situational awareness were developed driving big American cars and ingrained in the 1970's, and haven't changed appreciably since then. She still doesn't feel confident merging into 70 mph high density traffic, though she's seen me do it safely many, many times. (She's learning).

Because I'm constantly using different classes of vehicles, I've never been able to stop learning. Unlike most drivers, I don't think of myself to be a better than average driver :), I think of myself as someone who is surrounded by unpredictable drivers driving in unpredictable conditions.

I've learned to not rely on tires for traction because tires are only half the story. The street surface is variable and unknown, traction conditions can change in minutes on the same stretch of road, tires can fail at any moment. IMHO, "adverse handling " should be expected.

A skilled driver should have the foot sensitivity and street smarts to pull away from a stop cautiously every time, and slows down sufficiently before making every turn. A street smart driver, having seen someone in front of him lose traction at an intersection should be extra cautious at that intersection.

Chirping tires is due to the engine torque being able to overcome road friction, and if the friction is low enough to chirp tires under 5 mph, a skilled driver ought to be smart realize that the same would apply when braking at that speed. While it's true that a different tire than the OEM Goodyears may have better traction under some driving conditions, the "nut behind the wheel" should always be the controlling factor.

Driving skills don't automatically improve with age, (nor do well developed good skills suddenly disappear with age). Like any other skill, good driving is the result of experience, recognizing ones' mistakes, learning best practices, and constant attention to detail.

Maybe I expect too much from "skilled" drivers, but I figure that skilled craftsmen don't blame their tools. Smart, skilled drivers don't out-drive their tires, their brakes, or their reflexes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,238 Posts
Sorry, Dom, but I stand by my statement that "These are characteristics of unskilled or aggressive drivers."

"Lead foot" refers to trying to accelerate or brake faster than necessary or can be done safely. You don't have to be an aggressive driver to exhibit a lead foot occasionally. My personal "Mr. Myogi" driving instructor taught me to imagine that there was an egg between my right foot and the pedal. Unless you are on ice, from a standing stop there's no reason for that egg to ever be broken - for your tires to chirp.

Combined years of driving don't double a drivers experience or skills. Some old habits aren't necessarily relevant or appropriate under today's conditions. As an example, my wife and I are also over 60, and she has more years of driving experience than I, but her skills and situational awareness were developed driving big American cars and ingrained in the 1970's, and haven't changed appreciably since then. She still doesn't feel confident merging into 70 mph high density traffic, though she's seen me do it safely many, many times. (She's learning).

Because I'm constantly using different classes of vehicles, I've never been able to stop learning. Unlike most drivers, I don't think of myself to be a better than average driver :), I think of myself as someone who is surrounded by unpredictable drivers driving in unpredictable conditions.

I've learned to not rely on tires for traction because tires are only half the story. The street surface is variable and unknown, traction conditions can change in minutes on the same stretch of road, tires can fail at any moment. IMHO, "adverse handling " should be expected.

A skilled driver should have the foot sensitivity and street smarts to pull away from a stop cautiously every time, and slows down sufficiently before making every turn. A street smart driver, having seen someone in front of him lose traction at an intersection should be extra cautious at that intersection.

Chirping tires is due to the engine torque being able to overcome road friction, and if the friction is low enough to chirp tires under 5 mph, a skilled driver ought to be smart realize that the same would apply when braking at that speed. While it's true that a different tire than the OEM Goodyears may have better traction under some driving conditions, the "nut behind the wheel" should always be the controlling factor.

Driving skills don't automatically improve with age, (nor do well developed good skills suddenly disappear with age). Like any other skill, good driving is the result of experience, recognizing ones' mistakes, learning best practices, and constant attention to detail.

Maybe I expect too much from "skilled" drivers, but I figure that skilled craftsmen don't blame their tools. Smart, skilled drivers don't out-drive their tires, their brakes, or their reflexes.
Quote :A street smart driver, having seen someone in front of him lose traction at an intersection should be extra cautious at that intersection.


I was ! Having been racing for years on tracks all across the east coast and some in the south, I know how " not to overdrive my tires! "

I also lack tolerance for poor quality products of any kind. More so when my life, or my wifes life is involved. The Issues I have had with the Elements stock tires are well documented by several people on this forum. It's not just me.

I have also driven many types of vehicles under varying conditions. The issue with this tire is not that it loses traction, It's that it does it in an unpredictable way. Some tires will howl at you when you near the limits of adhesion, others will start to slide. This tire just goes away in an instant with no warning. I hope you never have to find that out in a difficult situation. Several laps in an Element on a closed race track, have proven that the stock tires are just a bit more, than somewhat lacking, in the area of predictability. I have GoodYear Fortera's on my E now, I have had them on the street for several years. No such Issue. They have also been on the Track, and were respectable, though not on par with the wifes Nokian WR SUV's, on the same track. Each of those sets of tires exhibits solid predictable characteristics. They are not close in handling, but do give you the feeling of knowing what the tire is going to do in a specific turn. The Stock tires do not posses the same predictable stability characteristics, In the same turn each and every time.

It's kind of like trying to drive on a dirt track with Drag racing slicks. They will work fine until you have to turn the car.

I admit, I like driving the stock tire on a closed track. It's fun to try to figure out what it's doing to you now! However that's not what I like to see on the street.


Dom
 

·
Registered
2008 Element EX AWD
Joined
·
2,829 Posts
Too many of our contemporaries have lost the willingness to accept new information and overwrite past experience with new experience. They try to hold onto things as they were, not as they are. They lack adaptability.

"Predictability" requires specific knowledge and experience with that specific thing. Expecting anything new to behave like anything else, makes it much harder to acquire the knowledge and experience needed to be able to accept and predict its behavior.

Fortunately for you, you had the resources to replace the tires with ones that help you feel more comfortable in your Element. Fortunately for me, I had the time and willingness to adapt to the characteristics of the Element with its original tires.

Our having different experiences with the same basic vehicle and tires, and our different responses to its handling doesn't make either of us wrong, it's just part of what makes us unique.

Happy driving. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
I have had a brand new '08 Jeep Liberty, and now a '10 E with the same GY Wrangler tire on them. I am a 63 year young female that is not an aggressive driver at all. These tires are a poor example of a tire. I had problems with traction etc. with the Liberty, and knowing that, I now notice it with these same tires on the Element. When you spend your hard earned $$ on a new car it makes me sad they cut corners on the tires......your life depends on your tires!!! I, for one, am tired of the quality of the Wranglers, and my life is important to me. So I WILL be replacing them ASAP!!!!!!!!!! They seem (just) OK on dry pavement, but let it rain, or snow in the winter, and they are downright daaaaangerous:shock::shock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Don't the 2010s have traction control? Maybe these old folks (I'm qualified-54 yrs old) should just turn it on! My 07 SC has it, I don't have traction troubles unless I'm really goosing it with the traction control off. That's MY fault. The Goodyears the SC came with lasted 53k miles on the front, and I replaced them with the same. The rear tires still look as new. :?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
Don't the 2010s have traction control? Maybe these old folks (I'm qualified-54 yrs old) should just turn it on! My 07 SC has it, I don't have traction troubles unless I'm really goosing it with the traction control off. That's MY fault. The Goodyears the SC came with lasted 53k miles on the front, and I replaced them with the same. The rear tires still look as new. :?

My Liberty had the traction control. The tires still had a lot of tread left on them....the Jeep only had 23000 miles on it. But they were downright dangerous when it rained or snowed. And I expect the same with the Element. Haven't had it long enough through the rain, and won't know till winter on the snow. But I'm not waiting that long;-) Didn't turn on the traction on the Jeep until I had snowy/ice conditions...you can ruin the traction otherwise. I was getting ready to buy new tires right before I decided on the Element again. For the most part, all new cars have the cheaper tires for OEM tires:twisted::twisted:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I'm just getting ready to replace the stock goodyears that came on my SC,I've got a little over 76,000 miles on them,I cant complain to much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
My Liberty had the traction control. The tires still had a lot of tread left on them....the Jeep only had 23000 miles on it. But they were downright dangerous when it rained or snowed. And I expect the same with the Element. Haven't had it long enough through the rain, and won't know till winter on the snow. But I'm not waiting that long;-) Didn't turn on the traction on the Jeep until I had snowy/ice conditions...you can ruin the traction otherwise. I was getting ready to buy new tires right before I decided on the Element again. For the most part, all new cars have the cheaper tires for OEM tires:twisted::twisted:
I beg to differ-traction control will not be harmed by it's use on any surface. All wheel drive,or four wheel drive MAY be, if there is no center differential. Traction control is an electronic limitatation on wheel spin-the computer will cut power to the wheels, where as the 4wd or Awd is mechanically controlled. Engaging 4WD without a center differential on dry pavement will indeed ruin the drive train. All wheel drive should have the center differential. Hope that helps..:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,238 Posts
Just an FYI The SC got better tires than the LX and EX got.


Dom
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top