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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have any experience with the blower motor not working? It was working one day and the next I had nothing. I've checked the fuses associated with the heater and no luck. I imagine it could be the relay or even the motor. Does anyone know how to test the relay to see if it needs to be replaced? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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As always, it's best to consult a factory service manual. That having been said ...

Fuse #12 (40A) in the under-hood box powers the blower motor. Fuse #14 (10A) in the under-dash box powers the blower motor relay as well as the A/C compressor clutch relay, A/C condenser fan relay, power mirrors, radiator fan relay, recirc. control motor, and rear defogger relay.

The blower motor relay is in the under-hood fuse box. It's larger than the rest, on the back side, labeled RY6 here. The relay should have a pinout diagram. Otherwise, you can isolate the contacts yourself.

Remove the relay. With the ignition off, use a 12V tester to locate the constant-power socket, which powers the motor via the relay. Then with the ignition on, locate the switched-power socket, which powers the relay. Verify that neither of the remaining two sockets is powered, then with the ignition off use a continuity light to determine which is ground. The last socket goes to the motor. (If the continuity tester lights on both, it's probably because the motor has fairly high resistance, and you'll need an ohmmeter to determine which socket is ground and which goes to the motor. I'll bet, though, that the light will be noticeably brighter on one socket—that's ground.)

With a fused 12V power source, power the relay's coil contacts and check the other two contacts for continuity. If the relay doesn't work, replace.

If you're unable to test the relay, you could bypass it for test purposes by jumpering the constant-power and motor sockets, but use heavy-gauge wire and be darn sure you've got the right contacts—if you were to accidentally jumper the constant power and ground, you'd get a nice big spark before the 40A fuse blows!

If the relay works and has switched and constant power, someone will have to get at the motor itself, to make sure it has power at the connector and that the connector is properly seated. If the power and ground connections are fine, then the motor is bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. I have ruled out fuses and have isolated the contacts on the relay socket as per the advice recieved here. I was unable to test the relay but did attempt to jumper the constant power and motor sockets. After jumpering these two should I expect the blower to run? I tried powering on the ignition switch and turning up the blower control but nothing happened. Well nothing relating to the heater blower, the engine cooling fan seemed to turn on when I turned up the fan. Interesting..... Anyway I shut it down and wanted to confirm these results or see if perhaps I did something wrong before trying to get and the motor and testing that. Thanks again for the help!
 

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edramshaw said:
After jumpering [constant power and motor sockets] should I expect the blower to run?
Yes, assuming you are also turning on the fan switch at the HVAC console.

edramshaw said:
I tried powering on the ignition switch and turning up the blower control but nothing happened.
Once the power and motor sockets are jumpered, turning on the ignition won't have any effect: It powers the relay, which you have removed.

edramshaw said:
The engine cooling fan seemed to turn on when I turned up the fan.
Coincidence, probably. Otherwise there is a weird circuit problem. Weird circuit problems are often the result of a bad ground somewhere.

A few possible causes remain, including the wiring from the relay to the switch; the connection at the switch; the switch itself; the wiring from the switch to the motor; the connection at the motor; and the motor itself. If the switch has power and checks out, you'll have to dig out the motor--and that calls for a service manual. Don't forget to check the motor's ground connection.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I've got an update on my blower problem, I also still have the problem. I have basically been busy with the birth of my new baby and my new business so I've done nothing further than the trouble shooting discussed here.

Now the update.....

After a nice cold New England winter (ok maybe not that cold, but at times it was rough) my blower started working again.....until today where it is no longer working. Has anyone else had any electrical problems like this? My E also suffers from intermitent dash lights near the gear shifter. I know other people have had this problem, perhaps it is related.

If any one has insight I would love to hear it. At this point it seems like I might just need to bring it in to the dealer.

Ed
 

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Heater Blower Issues..

My heater blower is only working intermittently which sucks because it's 30 degrees here and I have a 5 month old. It won't work and then all of a sudden it will turn on. I replaced the relay and the fuses look good. I know there is a power transistor for the blower and my problem is either that or the motor itself. Where is the transistor and is there a way to tell if it is good or not? Is it behind the glove box?
Thanks
 

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My heater blower is only working intermittently which sucks because it's 30 degrees here and I have a 5 month old. It won't work and then all of a sudden it will turn on. I replaced the relay and the fuses look good. I know there is a power transistor for the blower and my problem is either that or the motor itself. Where is the transistor and is there a way to tell if it is good or not? Is it behind the glove box?
Thanks
It is mounted in the HVAC plenum behind the glovebox. It is solid state, so basically you 'test around it", meaning you test the circuits going to and from it. Generally solid state components are not intermittant failures, when they fail, they are usually shot. Loose connections are more common as intermittants. Blower motors can go bad as well, though they usually won't work on start-up, rather than stop working while running. Sometimes you can verify a bad blower motor with a rap from a screw driver handle on the bottom of the blower motor when it's not operating but the ignition key and blower switch are 'ON'. It's rare, but I have seen faulty HVAC control panels fry the blower transistor - you'd need to verify that the control voltage at the transistor is not too high, and changes with different speeds selected.
 

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Something to Add

After finding out where the blower is at, I suspected that my blower motor has a "dead spot" in it......so after pulling the filter, which BTW, looked just aweful, was able to carefully move the blower fan and the blower took off immediately, best try this on low.

So since after "push starting" the blower, i think its reasonable to assume that the blower motor need replaced in this case. Time to get one on order and figure out just how that thing is going to come out......

any pointers to online sources diagrams that can be helpful in making repairs of any kind?

Tony in WV
 

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blower fan not working

The problem stated when I was driving with the AC on and all was well, suddenly the fan just stopped.

I have checked the power to the fan and get 12 volts with the switch off or on. When I plug the fan in it starts to turn for a split second and stops but does not pop a fuse. I can not test the relay because I can not find a pin diagram. I have read about a power transistor that is near the fan, I can not find it, and could the power transistor be my problem or would the relay be bad?
 

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The blower relay is in the under hood fuse/relay box, if the fan has +12v at the blue/white wire, the relay and fuse are working. The power transistor switches the motor to ground and completes the circuit allowing the motor to turn.

Try running the self-diagnostic on the heater control panel and see if you're getting a DTC #12.

If it does, check the #12 (40amp) fuse in the under hood fuse/relay box, and the #14 (10amp) fuse in the under dash fuse/relay box.

If it's not that test the fan motor, jump the blue/black wire and the black wire at the power transistor - the fan should come on when the ignition switch is in the run (II) position. The motor should come on, if it doesn't you'll have to verify the wire is going to the motor, and the black on is going to ground. (You did check and verify that there is 12v on the blue/white and the blue/black wires, right?)

After that, I would just try forcing the base of the power transistor and narrow it down to the transistor or the control panel. The power transistor will check like any other transistor - there's nothing special or magical about it. The base is pin #1 - the blue/yellow wire, and is controlled by the Heater Control Panel.
 

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I just fixed the problem, found a link on the web that stated to jump the thermal cutoff.

hXXp://forums.clubrsx.com/showthread.php?p=19132791

Does anyone know the manufacture and part number of the thermal cut off?

Hope this help others.
 

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That posting you referred to recommended jumping the fuse. It's there to protect the transistor from overheating. Make sure your cabin air filters are clean that could make it overheat. NTE (www.nteinc.com ) sells replacements but you need to know the original temperature rating. You might try the NTE 8096.
 

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While yes, jumping the thermal cut off will make the fan work, it is not the way I would recommend the repair be done. Actually, what little you save, will be taken up (many times over) in the damage that will come.

Bypassing any safety device is a very foolish way to repair any unit. If one is not 'electronically' inclined (able to do discreet component repair) the only option is to replace the power transistor.

I do this stuff for a living guys, trust me when I say 'jumping' an open thermal is just stupid.
 

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Check with Mouser I'm pretty sure they ship to Canada, and no minimum order either.

I think this is the part you're looking for - double check the part # of what you have. I am going by nothing other than the number you posted.
 

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Might be Heater Control Panel?

Quote from shop manual:

Blower Controls​
You can manually select the fan speed by turning
the fan control dial clockwise from the OFF
position. Turning the dial further clockwise
increases the fan’s speed, which increases air
flow.
Battery voltage is applied through fuse 12 (in the
under-hood fuse/relay box) to the blower motor
relay contacts at all times. With the ignition switch
ON (ll), the blower motor relay in the under-hood
fuse/relay box is energized, which feeds battery
voltage to the blower motor. The blower power
transistor controls the blower motor in all speeds
except HIGH. The blower power transistor is
controlled by the heater control panel. When the
control panel requests HIGH blower speed, the
blower power transistor grounds the blower motor,
which connects it directly to ground, making the
blower run at high speed.

Try running self test

A. turn the ignition switch off
B. press and hold both the recirculation and the rear window defrost switches
C. turn ignition switch on (II)
D. the diagnostic begins in about 15 seconds

after the self diagnostic any problems will be displayed as a series of blinks of the recirculation indicator. the pulses will repeat about every two seconds.

# blinks defect
none none
7 open in the air mix control motor circuit
8 short in the air mix control motor circuit
9 problem in the air mix control linkage, door, or motor
10 a short or open in the mode control motor circuit
11 problem in the mode control linkage, door, or motor
12 a problem in the blower motor circuit
13 a problem with the EEPROM in the heater control panel
14 (w/ac) open in the evaporator temperature sensor circuit
15 (w/ac) short in the evaporator temperature sensor circuit
 

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wow..

That self test is sweet. I am having some issues as well and I did the test and it flashed 11 times. My problems is when I turn the knob from Max/AC to feet/head or any others it just stays the same. Any idea how to fix it? It could have to do with the Viper remote start I had installed.
 

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That self test is sweet. I am having some issues as well and I did the test and it flashed 11 times. My problems is when I turn the knob from Max/AC to feet/head or any others it just stays the same. Any idea how to fix it? It could have to do with the Viper remote start I had installed.
Maybe if your lucky thet installers just left it unplged. If you open up the glove box like you are going to replace the cabin filter look to the left of the ECM (big tin box with four connectors) there should be a green connector with 7 wires that's the mode control motor. Also look to see if the attached white plastic arm isin't jammed by somthing.
 
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