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I own 2003 Element 98,000 miles. I follow the recommended maint. in the manual. I've decided to chang my spark plugs a little early, do I need to change the Ignition Coils as well ? :confused:
 

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No need to do anything unless you get an ECU diagnostic code telling you one has a misfire. Considering that the coils are $100 each (list) and there are four of them, it's not something that I'd advise changing prophylactically.

Also, not a known weak area for high-mileage E's.
 

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Mike,
Is that $100 from the dealer? I was thinking about doing this when I did the valves and changed the spark plugs and I saw prices online for around $35 a piece.
 

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Ah - interesting. Yeah, $100 is dealer list, although I know there are dealers out there who'll mark that up another fifty. My fave discounter (Majestic) quotes $71 each.

Where'd you see them for $35?
 

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I'm not sure, I meant to bookmark it. I followed a link to a parts supplier via someone else's post and found it while I was looking over the rest of the site. I'm pretty sure I was looking for NGK spark plugs when I happened upon it.
 

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The ignition coil generates the "spark" required to ignite gasoline. The ensuing explosion is part of the process the engine uses to create power. Older vehicles use only 1 ignition coil and a distributor to distribute the spark to each cylinder in the engine. Most modern vehicles use one ignition coil per engine cylinder. The ignition coils on these vehicles are located directly on top of the spark plug.

To replace the ignition coil, the electrical connection to the coil is disconnected and the hardware securing the ignition coil to the valve cover or manifold is removed. On some vehicles, it may be necessary to remove the intake manifold to gain access to the ignition coils.
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Ahhh, the automatic spammer posts are back. REPORTED!!
 

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Ahhh, the automatic spammer posts are back. REPORTED!!
You haven't the foggiest idea how infuriating this situation is. I mean, they've now cracked our captcha, that goofy scrambled-character graphic most forums use in the registration process supposedly to foil the spambots. Plus if you didn't notice, they're getting better and better about topically integrating their trash into threads to make it harder for moderators to snag the junk.

Anyway, I edited the quote in your post to rid it of the "payload" link, which was whole point of the spam to start with.
 

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You haven't the foggiest idea how infuriating this situation is. I mean, they've now cracked our captcha, that goofy scrambled-character graphic most forums use in the registration process supposedly to foil the spambots. Plus if you didn't notice, they're getting better and better about topically integrating their trash into threads to make it harder for moderators to snag the junk.
I've noticed.I'll keep an eye out for 'em. I usually catch them when I do my nightly "new topic browsing".

Any way to get rid of the 60 second time limit between reporting posts? I really like helping out when I can, but I get tired of having to wait every time. I'm really good at finding and reporting them. 60 seconds is too long to wait. :D
 

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No need to do anything unless you get an ECU diagnostic code telling you one has a misfire. Considering that the coils are $100 each (list) and there are four of them, it's not something that I'd advise changing prophylactically.

Also, not a known weak area for high-mileage E's.
I'm too amused with the $500 word "prophylactically" to worry with spam. :lol:
 
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