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that will prob be the biggest thread.... one more recommendation to the whining thread (you see i dont use the B word)..... delete it every 30 days please....cause its a waste of time / space as it accumulates.
 

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there are "problem solvers" made by moog and many other companies to correct rear camber issues. most FWD cars with rear beams are 100% non-adjustable, yet they seem to keep being built and sold. adjustable arms are now $105 a PAIR on ebay, and should be under an hour to install the pair as far as labor. now if you put half the effort that you put into bitching into researching for an answer you'd be happy. that's the downfall of our society lately, everyone wants to bitch more than they want to find an answer for thier problem. had a customer call me like a raving GD twit crying about his vw beetle needing an oxygen sensor that he replaced and demanded i tell him what else could be wrong if the code came back. so the code hasn't come back on and you want me to tell you how to fix what's not broken? and he starts yelling and cursing about foreign cars and such. no thanks.... *click*
I agree. The aftermarket has adjustable alignment kits for many makes and models of vehicles, not just Hondas. I had a home-based business selling sport compact and import performance parts for a few years (have been into the show/performance scene since 1998 ) and they made those parts way back then.

Riddle me this...if suing people or companies was suddenly banished forever, would people be so quick to call their lawyer?
 

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A few months after purchasing my Honda Element in September 2006 I would have been writing a rave review. I was thrilled with my car's performance and its versatility.
That feeling of euphoria continued until I noticed uneven wear on the vehicle's tires after I had had it aligned. I took the car in again to be aligned and discovered it was not possible. Apparently, Honda engineers designed the vehicle so the rear tires can not be realigned. The only other manufacturer who ever did this was Subaro on one of its 1970s models and they suffered similar bad press as a result.
The Element rear alignment problem is such a common problem that independent companies have now developed an after market kit that costs upward of $500 plus installation to correct it. And my informal survey of repair shops indicates the problem is widespread.
My car is and was under warranty when I discovered the existence of the design flaw; and already I needed a new set of tires.
Buying new tires doesn't seem a viable option if the problem that created the uneven tire wear is not repaired.
I contacted Honda asking that they resolve the issue under the warranty.
Its response: We don't warranty alignments! Though Honda executives I contacted, Tetsuo IWarmura, C. David Skidmore and others, readily admitted through their executive assistants that the design problem exists and the rear tires can not be aligned, they refused to pay for the necessary repairs to align it and new tires, and even refused to pay for installation of the after-market kit because they claimed they couldn't publicly acknowledge that such an after market kit was necessary.
They did however, offer me a $300 payment toward the purchase of new tires which I refused.
I asked them why I would accept $300 for new tires when the car would be unsafe to drive again in six months and without the necessary repair, I will need yet another set of tires to make it safe. Their response was too bad.
Since then I have lost all faith in Honda and its policies especially as they relate to the inherent design flaws in the Element.
I have reported Honda to all the consumer authorities including the CA Attorney General's Office, the US Atty. General's Office and the California Consumer Affairs Office and am awaiting arbitration.::x
A few months after purchasing my Honda Element in September 2006 I would have been writing a rave review. I was thrilled with my car's performance and its versatility.
That feeling of euphoria continued until I noticed uneven wear on the vehicle's tires after I had had it aligned. I took the car in again to be aligned and discovered it was not possible. Apparently, Honda engineers designed the vehicle so the rear tires can not be realigned. The only other manufacturer who ever did this was Subaro on one of its 1970s models and they suffered similar bad press as a result.
The Element rear alignment problem is such a common problem that independent companies have now developed an after market kit that costs upward of $500 plus installation to correct it. And my informal survey of repair shops indicates the problem is widespread.
My car is and was under warranty when I discovered the existence of the design flaw; and already I needed a new set of tires.
Buying new tires doesn't seem a viable option if the problem that created the uneven tire wear is not repaired.
I contacted Honda asking that they resolve the issue under the warranty.
Its response: We don't warranty alignments! Though Honda executives I contacted, Tetsuo IWarmura, C. David Skidmore and others, readily admitted through their executive assistants that the design problem exists and the rear tires can not be aligned, they refused to pay for the necessary repairs to align it and new tires, and even refused to pay for installation of the after-market kit because they claimed they couldn't publicly acknowledge that such an after market kit was necessary.
They did however, offer me a $300 payment toward the purchase of new tires which I refused.
I asked them why I would accept $300 for new tires when the car would be unsafe to drive again in six months and without the necessary repair, I will need yet another set of tires to make it safe. Their response was too bad.
Since then I have lost all faith in Honda and its policies especially as they relate to the inherent design flaws in the Element.
I have reported Honda to all the consumer authorities including the CA Attorney General's Office, the US Atty. General's Office and the California Consumer Affairs Office and am awaiting arbitration.::x
I vote for a new thread section named "bitch and moan, post your rant here". Seems to find it's way into all threads, and it'd be great to consolidate all of it.

As for the OP point, the camber on the rear is the only thing I think should be improved, or a way of adjusting. How useful to have an air shock set on the rear to take the sag out. I am not talking about overloading, just moderate adjustments to avoid sag for different loads. Someone has got to have an air shock sized for the E that could achieve this?
I'm having the same issues.
 
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