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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone -

Just received the leather steering wheel cover for my E. I'm wondering whether any of you have installed it yourself and if so, what are your recommendations to avoid hidden gotchas? Seems straightforward except a tad time consuming.

I'm going to wait a bit for the weather to warm before tackling this one. But I look forward to your thoughts/help!
 

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I have the same question. my dealer did not have time to install so gave me the number of a guy and pre paid the install. However, the doesn't work saturdays so I thought I would try it myself. HandA does not have directions. :?:
 

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Well, the instructions are in the box for the cover.

It is really pretty simple, but it does take time, lots and lots of time. It is basically threading this needle thru holes and tying a knot.
 

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Boneheadz,

I have actually started it, and got cold and gave up. I still have it in the box, and may get to it in about 30 degrees, maybe 40.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The directions in the box seem pretty straight forward, even for someone sewing challenged as I am. I am wondering about how to nicely connect the sections where the wheel spokes are, or maybe you just string the lace under the cover to the next section? Otherwise, I think you're right, time is probably the biggest part and the general tedium of going from hole to hole....

I figured I'd give this a shot before paying to have my dealer install it. With an hour estimated labor, this little cover could get mighty expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Today the winter weather gave us a break, so I took myself out to actually install the leather steering wheel cover. In a nutshell - total PITA!

A few lessons I learned:

1.) The pre-made holes on the steering wheel cover for the laces still have particles of the leather in it. It's helpful to take the needle and push through each one once to make sure it's cleaned out before you start. Otherwise, those particles will end up under your cover and create unsightly bumps.

2.) The tools of the installation: needle nose pilers, scissors, and a thimble (beer and/or nicotine supplements, optional). The kit comes with the needle and thread as well as directions.

3.) Stretching the cover over the wheel take some muscle, it doesn't just pop on the wheel without reminding the cover who's really in charge.

4.) Make sure the cover is aligned how you want it to look - once you start lacing, it doesn't allow for repositioning.

5.) I started at the bottom, between the lower wheel spokes. You need to pull the stiches very tight (no gaps between the two sides of the cover). As you move around the wheel, use the needle, if necessary, to loosen/retighten your previous stiches to really get a tight seal.

6.) Watch out for the thread tangling up and creating all sorts of mess. The thread is coated in wax, which if pulled, will kinda melt, making the tangles a real monster to undo. You'll also end up with a nice coating of this thread's wax on your hands by time your done, which is helpful if you have secret aspirations to be a candle.

7.) To get the cover to seal nicely around the spokes, you may find that adding another hole or two will help to really secure it down. Otherwise, there are little bubbles/bulges that appear around the spoke areas.

8.) You have plenty of thread included so don't worry about it. Managing it and keeping it all organized as you begin is another matter through.

9.) I tied a double knot and simply inserted it into the seam at the bottom when it's done then trimmed the remaining thread. Before making these final knots, I did a once over with the needle to loosen/tighten any areas that just didn't look right.

Sorry I don't have action shots a'la Element J (no digicam on my end), but it does come out very nicely. Keep in mind your fingers will be totally sore if you have wimpy psychologist hands like mine when you're done.

TOTAL INSTALL TIME: 1 hour 45 minutes (yes, it is tedious and long.)

Hope this helps someone else!

Erich (janus285)
 

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janus285,

WOW, great run down on the install.

I am now starting to give second thoughts to putting it on myself.
 

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I've done this before and janus285 pretty much hit the nail on the head. But I think the results are well worth the effort.
 

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And just how much was the dealer charging?

At some point, it just might be worth it. :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well my pointers withstanding, I'm somewhat dramatic so who knows, perhaps someone with car savy or sewing prowess could make this install easier. My dealer said an hour install time, at $80/hr, makes this adornment a bit too steep and worth the sore fingers and tedium to do it yourself.

Like Alien said, the results are fun.
 

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After installing, did you think the Leather cover was better than the factory cover? So far I am pretty happy with the factory cover, its got a nice feel to it, but i have a leather cover on backorder. I'm just wondering if it makes a big difference, and if it makes it a lot thicker?

Thanks.
 

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[quote:4b21aa057f="cozmakio"]After installing, did you think the Leather cover was better than the factory cover? So far I am pretty happy with the factory cover, its got a nice feel to it, but i have a leather cover on backorder. I'm just wondering if it makes a big difference, and if it makes it a lot thicker?

Thanks.[/quote:4b21aa057f]
This was my first accessory to install and was worth it in my opinion, not only makes the wheel thicker but just nice to have something organic in the car besides myself..
 

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I attempted to install the steering wheel cover last night and I was following the instructions and I was being carefull not to pull to hard on the thread, but I still ended up with a torn hole right at the top of the steering wheel.

Upon close inspection,I noticed that the cover was defective to begin with. The holes are generally located at the thicker part of the cover, but there are some holes that are misplaced further inside where it is weaker.

So be sure to check the cover for this defect before installation.

I hope Honda would replace it.
 

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[quote:d4a19fbe40="jlo"]I attempted to install the steering wheel cover last night and I was following the instructions and I was being carefull not to pull to hard on the thread, but I still ended up with a torn hole right at the top of the steering wheel.

Upon close inspection,I noticed that the cover was defective to begin with. The holes are generally located at the thicker part of the cover, but there are some holes that are misplaced further inside where it is weaker.

So be sure to check the cover for this defect before installation.

I hope Honda would replace it.[/quote:d4a19fbe40]

I installed mine and found that some holes were mis-spaced and some non-existent. Should have returned it then. If I were you I would return it immediately !!
 

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Re: Steering Wheel Cover Observations

a. It will take time, it will be painful, it's just more time behind the wheel and using NO gas! What more could you ask for? (wink)

b. If you're close to the factory, can you find out who does this AT the factory and how THEY do it? Somebody knows.

c. All the covers I've ever done were time consuming but worth it. It all hinges on the quality of the cover. After 15 years, my 84 Ford Bronco had it's cover removed and the wheel looked brand new (as for the Bronco that was a different story).
 

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My cover came in defective. I was wrestling it over the wheel, when I noticed that the sewing between gray and black was coming apart. I sewed it back together with regular polyester thread (back and forth several times for strength.)

I found that the material bulges around the spokes, I chose to just twist the cover around so that most of the slack is in the back. Also, the black material was wider than the gray, so it tended to bunch up more at the seam than the gray sections did.

This isn't the quality I expected, but it does look and feel nice.

It took me about 45 minutes, considering I did it in the length of one CD.

One side note, because the steering wheel is pieced together the way it is, the lower spokes of the wheel have sharp edges at the edges of the plastic. Not very ergonomic at all!
 

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Wahtever you do pay the dealer!!!!!!!! Its an art form to get it done right, most dealers have one designated tech who is good at it.
 

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My dealer wanted $60 an hour to do the job! I think doing it yourself gives you self pride and accomplishment :D I didn't mind doing it myself as long you pump up the 270 watts CD player. From a scale of 1 to 10, i would rate it as a 9 in looks. I do have a slight bump near the right spoke but since i am left handed, it dosen't bother me. Einstein is right about the spoke corners being sharp :D
 

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I installed a sw cover in about 2 hrs. It was time consuming but worth it. The feel of the wheel is superior to the factory.

The install requires much patience. Make sure you have plenty of light and time. A point to add. Around the spokes you can get a very tight and clean fit if you go through some of the holes twice. Also make sure the cover is properly aligned. :p

Good luck!

Mason :roll:
 
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