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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2003 Element with 316,000 miles logged on her. I've change the starter, Alternator and ignition switch.
The battery sits at 12.7 volts at idle she sits at 14.2 volts. The battery is a 3 year life span and has 1 more year to go.
At first she starts, but feels like she is a little slow to start. I turn off the engine and than I start the engine again and she just clicks, sounds
like the Bendix is not throwing the gear out. I start the engine and she just clicks and I turn the ignition serval times then she starts.
The positive and negative battery cables looks good and corrosion on either end of the cables. I'm stumped, is it the battery?
 

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Does jump starting it change anything? What is the quality of the replacement starter? Some of them just don't last long. I had an intermittent starting problem for a few months, I tested everything else then finally removed and had the starter tested, it failed. Also check the negative ground cable that goes from the battery to under the battery tray, that tends to disintegrate.
 

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Take battery to have it load tested. The voltage test is a quick and easy test anybody can do at home with a multimeter to help assess a batteries condition but it's not exactly the test needed for a starting vehicle. What you really want to know is how many amps the battery is pushing. This can be dangerous for the operator and equipment alike (if all you are using is a multimeter). You could buy an actual battery tester or try a voltage drop test but probably easiest to just take it to an auto parts store to get it load tested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Does jump starting it change anything? What is the quality of the replacement starter? Some of them just don't last long. I had an intermittent starting problem for a few months, I tested everything else then finally removed and had the starter tested, it failed. Also check the negative ground cable that goes from the battery to under the battery tray, that tends to disintegrate.
I bump started my Element and drove it 25 miles home. Parked it and shut the engine off. I turned the ignition and the starter just clicked and tried it several time and same result. So thinking it was the battery, I took the battery to Sam's Club to get it checked and it was good. So I changed the starter (NAPA). The engine started, but sound like the starter was sluggish. I took my Element to Auto Zone to get the starter and battery checked again. My alternator was no good, so I changed it...so every thing should be good, but nope snap! I have to turn the ignition several times with the starter just clicking and then the engine starts. The starter still sounds slow to start. Darn going to check the ground cable tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Take battery to have it load tested. The voltage test is a quick and easy test anybody can do at home with a multimeter to help assess a batteries condition but it's not exactly the test needed for a starting vehicle. What you really want to know is how many amps the battery is pushing. This can be dangerous for the operator and equipment alike (if all you are using is a multimeter). You could buy an actual battery tester or try a voltage drop test but probably easiest to just take it to an auto parts store to get it load tested.
I did use a multimeter. static battery reads 12.86 volts and when I start engine the voltage drops to 11.68 volts. The engine does start up and runs and voltage reads 14.2.
 

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Hi,
I live in Florida, you are in Hawaii...

These climates, (heat and humidity) causes a white powder corrosion to form inside copper cables and you can not really see it...

But it creates a high resistance, in the cable.

A voltage drop test on the cables with the VOM Meter should tell you.

New Battery Cables, may not be a bad idea anyway, you have gone this far?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi,
I live in Florida, you are in Hawaii...

These climates, (heat and humidity) causes a white powder corrosion to form inside copper cables and you can not really see it...

But it creates a high resistance, in the cable.

A voltage drop test on the cables with the VOM Meter should tell you.

New Battery Cables, may not be a bad idea anyway, you have gone this far?
I did clean the ground cable once before maybe 5 years ago and it had some corrosion, but not bad.
I did cover the exposed cable with electrical tape. This time I took off the tape and there was some green
and the weave of the cable was very loose. I cleaned the cable again and tightened the weave and the engine
turned, but most of all the voltage was way better. I will purchase a new ground cable.
 
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