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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone who has personally installed the engine blocker heater have any recommendations or suggestions? My brother got me one for Christmas. He has been in the garage for a while now cursing loudly. :| He is saying something about how he can't get some plug off from underneath. Freezer plug maybe? I'm afraid to go back out again and ask.

I have an 08 EX. Any suggestions or lessons learned ASAP would be greatly appreciated!!
 

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I haven't installed the block heater but....I did take the plug out.


there is a screw in plug located just above the oil filter on the back of the motor (passenger sideish).

You'll need a male hex socket or wrench ("allen wrench") to remove it. I believe it is 10mm.

It'll be snug. ;-)




I used a hex socket and a short extension on a 1/2" drive rachet.

With an allen wrench you'll need to put the long end in and turn it with a wrench...but good luck breaking it loose w/ a short 10mm wrench. You'd be better off cutting the "L" wrench and inserting the shaft in a 10mm socket.

Bring him a beer.

Good luck...have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Installed!

After much cursing, the engine block heater is installed. Just took it for a test run and waiting for it to cool to check coolant level and for leaks.

My brother had a heck of a time getting that freeze plug thing out! He even used some special tool you hook up to the air compressor! But, once that was done, the rest was easy!


Now, the true test will be when I start my car in the morning to see how easily it starts!
 

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After much cursing, the engine block heater is installed...
Good....glad to hear all is well.

Make sure you use a nice thick (and not too long) extension cord on that. 10ga is better if you've got one, but 12ga should work. Avoid a 14ga cord.

Are you gonna leave it pluged in all night, or put it on a timer so it starts warming things up an hour or two before you need to start it?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmm not sure. I didn't see any instructions on how long to leave it plugged in. I was planning on leaving it plugged in all night. See any issues with that? It will be a total of 8.5 hours.
 

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I have read (after being one that plugged mine in ALL night) that all you really need is a couple of hours to heat it up. I definitely makes sense, as the block heater just keeps on heating, wearing on the heater and wiring in the process.... :shock::razz::razz:

Once I replace the plug to mine (my own fault - be careful when you plug in NOT to bend the wiring at the end of the plug), I plan to turn on the outlet it's plugged in to when I get up in the morning, giving it about two hours to do the job.

Glad to hear the installation was successful, I installed mine, so I understand the frustration..... :roll:;-):)
 

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I was planning on leaving it plugged in all night. See any issues with that? It will be a total of 8.5 hours.
It isn't really necessary to leave it in all night (unless it is super flippin' freezing like single digits or below).

On my diesel work trucks, a Ford 7.3L PowerSmoke and a Dodge 5.9L Cummsapart (RIP), I use a heavy duty timer (not a lamp type!) and usually set it for about 2 hours. looks like this one. The Ford starts easily with only 2 hours, in fact, it only needs 1hr when temps are in the 20s and 30s.

I'd imagine a Honda motor would start easily and produce decent heat quickly with only an hour or so in your area. Fiddle around and make adjustments to the time as you see fit.
 

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Like others have said put it on a timer and it only pulls around 500 watts but I am not sure exactly how much. Keep wanting to do the install on mine as it gets damn cold around here. My Dodge diesel I turn it on about 45 minuets before I leave and its up to where it gets if left on all the time. As for the amperage almost any cord will work as the heater pulls less them 5 amps and a 10 guage cord is good for 30 amps 12 is good for 20 amps 14 good for 15 and I don't get this but 16 is also good for 15 amps and all this is good to 200 feet without a voltage drop. Right out of handy dandy Ugly's electrical book. Now for the real thing I have found that almost any cord will work but keep the connections clean and you should have no problems.:grin:
 

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I don't mean to implie that the engine block heater is impractical but at what point does someone need the heater? I live in WI and I never get to park in a garage so my 2009 E sits in the cold weather -10 F sometimes and it justs starts sluggishy but, but it does start. Since 99% of the time there is no outlet for me to plug in if I did have a heater are there any alternatives that work "anywhere"

thanks
 

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Mine starts at -30C without it being plugged in...takes a bit of time to get heat blowing in those temps ;-)
 

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The engine heater is nice in cold temperatures because it makes starting easier (less wear and tear) and the vehicle will produce cabin heat sooner. (better than letting it idle to "warm up.")


I guess the Honda block heater has less draw than the one in my Ford. A 25'14ga cord wont do it. I'm used to using engine block heaters in "bigger stuff," not Elements. ;-)

As for alternatives.....(don't try this at home boys & girls)
Back in college my buddy had a diesel Chevette...4 door chick magnet.:roll: Only the right front brake worked....but it still stoped "fine." The poor little pig was so slow one little brake was plenty. It never wanted to start in temps below 30deg F. In Scranton, PA that was half the school year! Anywho, my buddy used to put charcoal briquets in a metal trash can lid and light 'em up and set the whole mess on the ground under the engine to heat it up about an hour before we had to go somewhere in it. The way that thing oozed fluid I'm surprised it never cought fire. BTW, when we couldn't afford fuel we stopped by the Aamco transmission place and filled the tank with almost free waste ATF. Made starting even harder and performance even more sluggish, but we had more money for beer. :-D
 

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I don't mean to implie that the engine block heater is impractical but at what point does someone need the heater? I live in WI and I never get to park in a garage so my 2009 E sits in the cold weather -10 F sometimes and it justs starts sluggishy but, but it does start. Since 99% of the time there is no outlet for me to plug in if I did have a heater are there any alternatives that work "anywhere"

thanks
I don't have one on my E but would like to get one. -10F is right around the temp where you may want something keeping the car warm; much below -20 and it can get hard to start many cars; -30 to -40 below, and the engine oil turns to taffy.

We have a remote starter on our van, that includes a low temperature mode. So on the coldest nights we can set it to start itself up if it hits -5 and then it runs for 10 minutes or so. I have never stayed up all night monitoring it, but I think it runs twice on the worst nights, the -20's, so around midnight and then around 5am or so. It does make a noticeable difference in starting the car. So that could work for you (plus the huge benefit of the remote starter for all those other cold mornings).
 

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As for alternatives.....(don't try this at home boys & girls)
Back in college my buddy had a diesel Chevette...4 door chick magnet.:roll: Only the right front brake worked....but it still stoped "fine." The poor little pig was so slow one little brake was plenty. It never wanted to start in temps below 30deg F. In Scranton, PA that was half the school year! Anywho, my buddy used to put charcoal briquets in a metal trash can lid and light 'em up and set the whole mess on the ground under the engine to heat it up about an hour before we had to go somewhere in it. The way that thing oozed fluid I'm surprised it never cought fire. BTW, when we couldn't afford fuel we stopped by the Aamco transmission place and filled the tank with almost free waste ATF. Made starting even harder and performance even more sluggish, but we had more money for beer. :-D[/QUOTE]


Boy that brings back memories.:grin:
 

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I don't have one on my E but would like to get one. -10F is right around the temp where you may want something keeping the car warm; much below -20 and it can get hard to start many cars; -30 to -40 below, and the engine oil turns to taffy.
This is one reason why I use Mobil-1 oil.
BTW, at -40, it can turn to whatever it wants because I'm not going out there to see.
 

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installed block heater today

I haven't installed the block heater but....I did take the plug out.


there is a screw in plug located just above the oil filter on the back of the motor (passenger sideish).

You'll need a male hex socket or wrench ("allen wrench") to remove it. I believe it is 10mm.

It'll be snug. ;-)




I used a hex socket and a short extension on a 1/2" drive rachet.

With an allen wrench you'll need to put the long end in and turn it with a wrench...but good luck breaking it loose w/ a short 10mm wrench. You'd be better off cutting the "L" wrench and inserting the shaft in a 10mm socket.

Bring him a beer.

Good luck...have fun.

After a few days of -27F and -29F here in Sioux Falls, SD, I installed a heater block.

It was a bear to remove the plug. I used a 10mm hex bit socket in the longest 3/8 ratchet that would fit in the very confined/cramped space.

It was difficult and impossible to torque the block heater to 44 foot pounds due the lack space to use the wrench. So I tighten the block heater in place hand tight w/o excessive force making sure not to strip any threads.

The power consumption is 400 watts. That is about 4.8 cents an hour at 12 cent a kilowatt. Far cheaper than idling engine to warm it up and easier engine starting.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I don't mean to implie that the engine block heater is impractical but at what point does someone need the heater? I live in WI and I never get to park in a garage so my 2009 E sits in the cold weather -10 F sometimes and it justs starts sluggishy but, but it does start. Since 99% of the time there is no outlet for me to plug in if I did have a heater are there any alternatives that work "anywhere"

thanks
I think the battery is too small for the vehicle. In early January, we had some of the coldest temps here this area has seen in decades. We were in single digits plus wind chill. My car has been VERY hard to start. That is why I decided to get the engine block heater. I did have my battery tested and its fine. Now that I have the heater, my car starts nice and smoothly and the cabin heats up very quickly. I save gas by not having to sit and let my car idle in the driveway for 15 minutes each morning before my commute to work. For a $40 part, it is WELL worth it and I would recommend it to anyone with an E. I think in the long run it will save my engine life too.
 

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They will start in subzero temperatures but it is better for the engine and environment to use a block heater. The closer the engine is to operating temperature when started the less wear occurs and most wear happens at start up. Even at +20F it is better for the engine to use a block heater. Those whom operate in extreme cold temperatures will use block heaters, oil pan heaters, battery blankets, and even install pan heaters on their transmissions. There is an alternative that works anywhere but it is not inexpensive. A company called Webasto makes gas(or diesel) fired heaters that hard hard plumbed into your vehicle and use your fuel supply and battery power. They have timers so it will come on when programmed, etc. I do not know if you can fit one to an Element but might be able to.

I don't mean to implie that the engine block heater is impractical but at what point does someone need the heater? I live in WI and I never get to park in a garage so my 2009 E sits in the cold weather -10 F sometimes and it justs starts sluggishy but, but it does start. Since 99% of the time there is no outlet for me to plug in if I did have a heater are there any alternatives that work "anywhere"

thanks
 

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I am interested in this block heater but I have a few questions.

Where exactly does the plug end up? The cord on my Dodge pokes out just above the front bumper, just enough room between the hood and the bumper for the cord.

Any possibility of coercing the dealer into a free/reduced cost install considering I've only owned this beast a week? Wrap it into the 600 mile service?

Appreciate any thoughts on this old thread. Old to me at least!


ick
 

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My block heater quit working.... Installed 14 months ago and used heavily last winter.
Plugged it in last night, this morning sluggish slow starting.

TOnight I tested the system.
118V at the extension cord. Check.
Disconnected the supply voltage, and measured the resistance across the 2 terminal at the plug, Nothing. -open circuit.
Unplugged the connection at the block heater and jumpered the 2 terminals, measured the resistance at the plug end, Check. -closed circuit.
finally, Plugged the extension cord back in, and measured the voltage at the block heater end, Check -118V.
So the Extension cord works, the honda wiring is good, and the block heater is burned out(open circuit). Piss Poor for a genuine honda part and only 14 months old.
 
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