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So here's a stupid question. I found a neat little adapter that you plug into your 12v source, and it uses a 9v battery to maintain your settings like radio, etc. But I realized later that when the key is off there is no power from the 12v source. Does that mean plugging into it will also not provide juice to the electrical system unless the key were to remain on? I think I might have bought another paperweight I don't need.
 

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You could try plugging turning the key to the ignition ("II") position, plugging in the battery gadget, and then disconnecting your battery. Since the ignition setting powers a variety of relays, the 9V might not last very many minutes.

IIRC Dom.five used such a device successfully.

Paul there is so much stuff on with the key on, the voltage of the 9V batt. may not be sufficient to Carrie the load. For the time it takes to do the changeover.

With the method I use, nothing is being supported, but the volatile memory in the computers, and the clock.

Dom
 

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> With the method I use, nothing is being supported, but the volatile memory in the computers, and the clock.

Ah! My poor old brain failed me. Here's Dom's method. The radio memory is always connected to the main battery terminals, but it's only connected to the power outlet when other devices are in the mix too.
 

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Just read through that thread and was wondering....did Tim ever figure out it was just the POS Optima battery that was causing all his problems? I know of 8 differnt Optima Red Tops in 3 different cars that did almost the exact same thing.
 

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Hi NismoGriff, the issue with Tim's vehicle was not related to his Optima battery, but with his starter. Generally speaking, if a battery can be fully-charged (appx. 12.6-12.8 volts for RedTops and 13.0-13.2 volts for YellowTops) and hold close to that voltage for 12-24 hours afterwards, without being connected to a vehicle or other draw, the battery should be fine. If the same battery then loses voltage when connected to a vehicle, there is likely a parasitic draw within the vehicle that needs to be addressed.

I'm sorry to hear about the problems you've heard of with our RedTops and I'd like to learn more about them. In Tim's thread, you indicated the issues in the three other vehicles disappeared when Optimas were replaced with other batteries. Are these different vehicles than the three you mentioned in this thread and if not, where do the other five Optimas factor into the equation? What kind of timeframe was involved with these batteries and were these stock vehicles or did they have aftermarket stereos, alarm systems or other signficant electrical demands, such as those listed in your signature? I appreciate your assistance with this and look forward to your response.

Jim McIlvaine
eCare Manager, OPTIMA Batteries, Inc.
www.facebook.com/optimabatteries
 

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Hi NismoGriff, the issue with Tim's vehicle was not related to his Optima battery, but with his starter. Generally speaking, if a battery can be fully-charged (appx. 12.6-12.8 volts for RedTops and 13.0-13.2 volts for YellowTops) and hold close to that voltage for 12-24 hours afterwards, without being connected to a vehicle or other draw, the battery should be fine. If the same battery then loses voltage when connected to a vehicle, there is likely a parasitic draw within the vehicle that needs to be addressed.

I'm sorry to hear about the problems you've heard of with our RedTops and I'd like to learn more about them. In Tim's thread, you indicated the issues in the three other vehicles disappeared when Optimas were replaced with other batteries. Are these different vehicles than the three you mentioned in this thread and if not, where do the other five Optimas factor into the equation? What kind of timeframe was involved with these batteries and were these stock vehicles or did they have aftermarket stereos, alarm systems or other signficant electrical demands, such as those listed in your signature? I appreciate your assistance with this and look forward to your response.

Jim McIlvaine
eCare Manager, OPTIMA Batteries, Inc.
www.facebook.com/optimabatteries
Jim, the vehicles mentioned in both threads were the same. I apologize,the number of batteries is actually 7, not 8. This total comes from replacements being issued from the retailer which in turn failed. Two of the vehicles I was able to verify that there was less than 175mA of current draw with the key off and the vehicle all closed up. This draw was all but removed when the fuse for the clock/memory circuit was removed. The Honda was remedied by installing a Honda battery. The Mazda (my wifes vehicle) had a Duralast battery installed and it seemed to hold fine...the vehicle has since been sold. The other vehicle, I did no testing for current draw, but the owner is a 15+ year 12 volt veteran and said he couldn't find any issues. His truck did set a lot without being driven, but I have an old Ford Ranger that sits for months on end, even through the winter and it fires right up on a Duralast battery. None of the Optima batteries in question lasted very long. In fact, the second unit in my wifes car started acting up about 3 weeks after it was installed. Yes, the vehicles had stereo systems in them, nothing massive, but not stock either. Not sure if I answered all your questions, it's late and I am not completely focused :|
 

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Hi NismoGriff,

The typical key-off load for most vehicles is about 25 milliamps and we encourage people to review their electrical system if their draw exceeds 100 milliamps. I know you mentioned 175 mA, but lets cut that about in half to 85mA and do some some simplified calculations.

An 85 milliamp draw means a vehicle is discharging a battery at a rate of 2.04 amps (.085 x 24 hours) per day. If it is running a 34/78 RedTop, the Capacity rating is 50 amps. This means the battery will be dead (0% state of charge), if it sits for 24.5 days (50/2.04) without any charge going to the battery. These calculations assume the battery is fully-charged when it is parked (most are not) and does not take into consideration climate, which can shorten (heat) or lengthen (moderate temps) these timeframes.

It should be noted that different vehicles will require a different minimum voltage to start, which probably is something above 0% state of charge. Using these numbers, if this vehicle only drew 35 milliamps, it could sit for almost 70 days before the battery died. If it was drawing 175 milliamps, the battery could be dead in just under 12 days.

It's also worth mentioning that even if a vehicle does not sit long enough to completely discharge the battery (for example, 1 month in the above 35 milliamp calculation), this repeated partial discharge, and the sulfation that will be caused by the battery resting in a discharged state, will cause long term reductions in performance and life. This is why we emphasize the importance of maintaining 12.4 volts and recommend a maintenance charger for any vehicle that is not used regularly.

Jim McIlvaine
eCare Manager, OPTIMA Batteries, Inc.
www.facebook.com/optimabatteries
 
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