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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So, I went to a long lost friend's house today, and they had a dog called a Newfoundland or something like that, I can't remember that they say was given to them from a tennant. They also said that you can't find one in California, and that he was an "import" so to speak, he was only 1 year and a half old and he was huge, and a very lovable dog, and supposedly still a puppy. I really fell in love with the type of dog and now I really want one, where can I find one? Distance doesn't matter, if I have a way to get one back home. I may also wait out till I move to Washington and then find one, but I'm not sure. I figured someone on here would know with the amount of dog-lovers.

Edit: Seems there is a sub-forum specifically about animals, did not see that. feel free to move this.
 

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Hi
I own a Newfie that is Sam in my avatar. they are great dogs Love sponges big furry drooling. get on newf.net it is a great site
Sam was a rescue please think about going that way.
Mel
 

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Newfies are awesome! I have a black lab that is awesome as well. Hair, slobber, drool, it's all part of their charm:)
 

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Amen to the rescue dog services- there are so many pets that desperately need a home, or... well, we know what happens with the unadopted in many shelters.

I find my pets on petfinder.org, a clearinghouse website of shelters, rescues and the like- all listings are pets in desperate need of a home, and you can search by breed (in this case newfoundland), age, sex, and distance from your home ZIP code. One search will cover literally dozens of organizations.

My puppy-dog, Maguire is a yellow-lab mix, I've had him for 8 years now, and he is my best buddy, and loves his "E," especially when he has gone swimming!

Good luck with your search!
 

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Serj: try not to be in a rush.

This should be a decade or more commitment (the bigger dogs generally have shorter lifespans than smaller pups) so you want to carefully research the breed and who you may be getting it from.

For instance, every breed has health issues and you need to know what to be on the lookout for. Whether you get a rescue or not, be prepared at any moment to spring for $2000 at the vet.

I'm frequently asked where I got Gidget and how much she cost and I always answer that the purchase price was just a down payment on the cost of ownership (we spent $2000 at the vet the first year dealing with recurring bladder infections). I won't recommend anyone to get a Samoyed unless I am 110% sure they would be up to it.

Yesterday's plans were blown to H because Gidget woke me up at 5:00a by jumping on the bed and indicating that she was in discomfort (you learn to read your pup) so we ended up at the vet because it turns out she has a burgeoning "hot spot" on her tail (vet bill = $110).

Are you aware what kind of exercise Newfies need and are you able to provide that everyday?

Do you know if you want a puppy or an older Newfie?

I worry about impulsive desire to get a dog, especially if someone has never been solely responsible for one before. I have no idea if you're being impulsive or have been solely responsible for a pup before or not, but am compelled to throw this out there for your consideration.

Gidget meets a lot of peops and I often hear: "We've got to get one of these!" Makes me cringe. I hastily point out just how much constant work goes into keeping Gidget looking good and how much work went into ensuring she had a good disposition and behavior.

The reason there are so many dogs in shelters is people don't honor the commitment they have to the dogs they get. In some cases because they cannot but in most cases because they choose not to.

Newfies are a magnificent breed. I'd be surprised if you couldn't get any breed in California, including Newfies. I'm seeing in a Google search that there is a club for northern California, one for southern California and one for San Diego:

Northern California Newfoundland Club
http://www.ncnc.org/NCNC/Home.html

Welcome to the NCNC

The NCNC is the largest Newfoundland club in the Western US, sponsoring working dog events, offering public education, and promoting the understanding and appreciation of this special breed. We benefit from the participation of a wide variety of members, from conformation fanciers to working dog trainers to pet owners looking for fun and support in the company of their fellow Newf lovers.

Southern California Newfie Club
http://www.newfclubofsocal.com/

Newfoundland Club of San Diego
http://ncsd.biz/

National Newfie Club
http://www.ncanewfs.org/index.shtml


I encourage prospective Samoyed owners to join the nearest Samoyed club as well as the national club. This is the best way to network in search of a competent breeder and to get in line for a rescue pup if that's the way you want to go.

For dogs sake, good breeders and responsible rescue groups are discriminating in who they will allow to have one of their dogs.

Best wishes in your quest.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Serj: try not to be in a rush.

This should be a decade or more commitment...
For instance, every breed has health issues and you need to know what to be on the lookout for. Whether you get a rescue or not, be prepared at any moment to spring for $2000 at the vet....


Are you aware what kind of exercise Newfies need and are you able to provide that everyday?

Do you know if you want a puppy or an older Newfie?

I worry about impulsive desire to get a dog, especially if someone has never been solely responsible for one before. I have no idea if you're being impulsive or have been solely responsible for a pup before or not, but am compelled to throw this out there for your consideration.



I've had two dogs. I had a mutt, that was partially German Shepphard, and that's all I could tell. She lived about 15 years that I had her and I was heartbroken when she died of Kidney failure in my lap. I took her to the vet and they said she'd be ok to go home, but the next day she passed. It was one of the saddest, if not the saddest day of my life. I took really good care of her but I guess it was just her time. I really wish I had the chance to get her put down though, I could tell it was painful. Her name was Buddy.

Then I had Goofy, and he is a Black Lab/ Something else, and he wound up liking my step-mother more than he liked me for the brief period I moved back in with my dad, so I left him there for her, since I'd also be moving into an appartment, and that's not fair for that kind of dog. No yard to run and have to stay inside while I worked, but now I'll be moving to a large house with a huge huge yard, so it is a possability to get a dog again. I love dogs and I've never left them, or not cared for them. All my dogs also have gone with me on all my trips. Although Buddy was afraid of the Woods, so when we went camping she'd just shake and quiver the whole time.

To your other Questions: No, I have no idea what kind of excercise they'd need, but I assume quite a bit, and I'm sure they may have some problems because of their size, but I don't mind taking care of a pet, regardless of cost. I don't really get a pet just because I saw one, or want one, I think a lot before I do that kind of thing, and the Newfie was just the one I saw and I went, "that's the one." I'm going to start researching them so I know what to do. Before this I had considered getting a Husky, or a Malamute. I do not mind fur everywhere or drool, it's the price you have to pay. MY lab drooled everywhere, and I mean EVERYWHERE, but that was ok though too. My parents take real good care of him, and I believe they are moving onto a large boat and moving to Monterey and taking him with them, and I think that's great. They also managed to teach him a lot of tricks, like you can "shoot" him with your finger and rolls over and plays dead, and he dances on his hind legs, and somehow became real obediant. Maybe it's just because he likes them better. I don't know.:D

I don't care if it's a puppy or an older dog, granted, that it not be REALLY OLD, because I don't want the heart break to set in that fast if you know what I mean. I would gladly get a rescued one, although, I have no idea how you go about doing that? Do you go to a shelter and pay for them? Or what?
 

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I would gladly get a rescued one, although, I have no idea how you go about doing that? Do you go to a shelter and pay for them? Or what?
Sounds like you are a certifiable dog person, Serj. :)

If your heart is set on a Newfie, I would look at the nearest Newfoundland club website, I listed three below plus the national club, and see if there are any breeders or Newfie events nearby. And whether there is a Newfoundland Rescue Group in your area.

That'd be a great way to learn more about the breed
-- meet the breeders and Newfie owners. Let them know you're very interested in getting a Newfie and are open to getting a puppy but also considering an older Newfie or a rescue.

Breed clubs support their own breed-specific rescues. For instance, there are several regional and state Samoyed Rescue groups around the country. And at the Samoyed Nationals (show) there are always fundraisers for Samoyed rescue. Coincidentally, yesterday I ran into the head of the Mid-Atlantic Samoyed Rescue when I was walking Gidget around the Capitol.


These breed rescues are getting their breed of dogs out of pounds and are a place that owners who can no longer care for their pup can go, knowing that their pup will be taken care of and placed in new homes by breed aficianados.

And do not rule out getting a puppy or an older Newfie from a reputable breeder of Newfoundlands (i.e. not a puppy mill, pet store or backyard breeder).

When you have your heart set on a certain breed it is perfectly honorable to seek out the best breeder you can find -- someone devoted to the breed and who is discriminating in who they will sell a puppy to. A breeder who insists that you sign a contract stipulating that if you are unable to care for the breeder they will take the dog back (better than having the dog dumped at a pound) unless there is a mutually agreeable alternative. A contract will also typically require a fenced yard and that you feed a quality food. I don't know how enforceable these contracts are but I wouldn't buy a puppy from a breeder who didn't care enough to require one.

Gidget's breeder lives in Colorado and has become a good friend. And a great resource. When Gidget was suffering recurring bladder infections it was her breeder who got hold of the Samoyed community nationally to gain insights on treatment which Gidget's specialist concurred with and which was successful.

Whether you get a Newfie from rescue or from a breeder, I'd recommend looking at joining a Newfie club that does fun athletic activities with the dogs. Our local club does hikes, an annual Sammy swimming party, dogscootering-bikejoring, holiday hike, Cherry blossom hike, Info-fair and all kinds of get-togethers. We just did a "canine cruise" a couple weeks ago on the Potomac. And you make friends who share your love for the breed and so Gidget always has other Sammies to hang with and I get to laugh with other Sammy owners who have to pick dog hair out of their contacts.

Pups like hanging out with their own kind. Gidget can spot another Sammy a mile away. It's uncanny. And working dogs -- such as the Newfie and Samoyeds -- like participating in their activities with Newfie buddies.

And when you want another Newfie, these are the go-to peops.

Good luck!

:)




 

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Although THIS dog is spoken for, I'm sure the breeder can conjur up another one, for a price.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Tibetan Mastiffs have joined the roster of luxury items coveted by China's wealthy elite, according to a purchase reported by local media.

A young woman paid $600,000 (£360,000) for a Tibetan Mastiff and had a convoy of luxury cars meet her and the dog at an airport, the Xian Evening News said. "Gold has a price but this Tibetan Mastiff doesn't," the woman, named only as Wang, was quoted as saying. The dogs typically sell for about $2,000 outside China, breeders say.
Ms Wang and the dog were met at Xian airport after she returned from buying it in Qinghai province in north-west China, home to many ethnic Tibetans. She was greeted by fellow lovers of Tibetan Mastiffs, who held up a long red banner welcoming the dog to Xian, capital of Shaanxi province.
Ms Wang said she and a friend had spent a long time looking for a true Tibetan Mastiff. The dogs are fairly rare in Tibet and around the world, and are valued by the nomadic peoples of Central Asia for their skills as watch dogs. Tibetan Mastiffs were also traditionally used to guard Buddhist monasteries in Tibet. The dogs are large and fierce, reaching a height of up to 80cm (31 inches) and a weight of 80kg (176 lbs).
Richard Gardiner, chairman of the Tibetan Mastiff Club of Great Britain, said mastiff puppies typically sell in the West for between $1,400 and $2,000.



 

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If you haven't previously had a large breed dog, I'd suggest go back to your friend who has one, explain your situation and see if you can 'babysit' the dog for a weekend or two.

Just like your friends' cute kids, caring for a large dog involves a lot more commitment and effort than you might suspect. You want to be sure you are ready to the the center of the universe for a large animal before you take on the responsibility.
 
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