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I bought a used 2008 Element with 94000kms. Experiencing engine problems on long distance trip across the Rocky Mountains.
Initially engine light came on with a Misfire cylinder 3 code after driving in cruise control at highway speed. I took my vehicle to a Honda Dealer and my spark plugs were replaced and a valve adjustment was done. I carried on my journey and at about 1000 kms later I experienced another engine light code of Misfire Cylinder 1 and 2. Engine light coming on when going up a large hill. I went to another garage and one of the spark plug boots had a singe, indicating that the spark wasn't being directed through but into the rubber of the boot. All 4 of my boots were replaced. Then at 1000kms after the most recent repair the engine light came on again with Misfire Cylinder 3. The engine light come on again while going up a steep hill and trying to maintain a steady speed. When I took the car into a garage to get the code read for the last engine warning the mechanic hooked the machine up and saw that at that current time all cylinders were firing properly. The code was erased and I was able to drive the car another 400 kms to get home with no problems experienced at that time(able to use cruise control, maintain highway speed)
Has anyone experienced this problem with their Element, what is causing the misfire? I am riding it too hard over large inclines, should I be putting it into D3? Any input would be wonderful!
 

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Welcome to the forums! I don't really know much about your issue, but I wonder if they also replaced the coils when they replaced the boots. If you feel up to it, you can move around the coils and see if the misfire follows a certain coil.

I don't think there should be any reason to keep it in D3 (unless towing or something) to prevent a misfire.

I think there might be a very small chance it could be a bad batch of fuel, or maybe something to do with the elevation changes and different fuel octanes available at higher elevations. If you're home now, maybe drive it around for a tankful and see if an issue persists.
 
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