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Discussion Starter #1
There used to be what was called the Chrysler minivan, and before that, the VW Microbus. I think that my creation might aptly be named the Nanocamper, although it might possibly be called another name, which I will give later on in this thread.

This is a build thread of how a Honda Element was turned into the Nanocamper.

We purchased a used 2008 EX 5AT AWD low mileage (16,000 miles) Element in September 2010, with the plan to have an Ecamper conversion done by Ursa Minor Vehicles, followed by me building out the interior to become a full miniature RV or camper van. The Ecamper conversion was performed late November/early December 2010 at their Chula Vista (near San Diego, CA) facility.

http://www.ursaminorvehicles.com

After the Ecamper pop top conversion I essentially gutted the interior behind the front seats and did an extensive interior conversion. The conversion took a lot longer than I expected, as I was still working and my wife and I had/have a busy adventure travel schedule, including local, national and international travel. I am now retired and was really able to go into high gear after retirement to finish the conversion.

Photos of the Element before Ecamper pop top conversion:





Sunroof that eventually becomes the access into the sleeping area after Ursa Minor removes the glass and adds their conversion:



Photos after the Ecamper conversion:









Some night time images of the interior conversion that I did. The lighting is provided by the LED overhead/task/cabinet lighting that I added.

Dometic refrigerator on pantry slide pulled out into the aisle:



Dometic refrigerator stored and cabinet lighting turned off:



Looking backwards from front seat showing small folding stool used both as a seat and as the first step for entering the sleeping quarters above. The stool is also a good height for using on the ground with the tailgate acting as a table. The black patches on the countertops are non-slip pads which are the second step for entering the sleeping quarters above through the hatch:



Some lighting switches, 12 V outlet, 120V shore power, small storage space and fire extinguisher on passenger side:



Driver side lower cabinet with covers removed and interior LED cabinet lighting on. The black straps are 1/2" nylon webbing with fastex buckles for securing loose loads in the cabinets:



Daytime shot of interior conversion:



The final camper has countertops, ample storage cabinets, five gallons of water storage, cooking facilities (that can be used outside on a picnic table, on the tailgate, or in bad weather, inside), a Dometic 12V/120V frig/freezer and a porta-potti. It has both a house 12 V and a shore 120 V system, and a house LiFePO4 battery that can be charged via 120 V shore power, via 12 V power while driving, or via a solar panel while camping. The solar panel is stored behind one of the cabinet doors when driving. The house battery powers LED overhead, task and interior cabinet lighting that I installed. I've also re-wired the LED lights in the Ecamper sleeping area upstairs to run off of the house battery instead of the starting battery. The starting battery has a disconnect so that I can completely disconnect it while camping for days at a time, with no worry about accidentally draining the starting battery. The starting battery can also be charged via the solar panel, and I have added a Battery Tender so that the starting battery can be charged and topped off when 120 V shore power is available if the Element is not used for extended periods.

I am mostly done with this build, although I am still doing some fine-tuning and finishing touches at this time, and I will probably continue to make minor modifications as we continue to use it. For example, it is not obvious in the photos I posted, but there are numerous tie down points for securing large loose items that don't fit into the cabinets. In addition, I plan to add a variety of mesh pockets on various surfaces to store additional small items.

This thread will be a very through documentation of the complete build process and a discussion of the decisions I made and how I tackled various problems and issues along the way. One of the biggest issues was working within the limited interior volume and gross vehicle weight capacity of the Element, building cabinetry small and light enough to stay within those limits, while keeping it plenty strong and usable by two adults. Fortunately the Element has a generally flat floor behind the front seats, which greatly simplified the build.

My wife and I are both experienced hikers and mountaineers, and have spent many, many nights in small tents in the mountains. Despite us both being retirement age, we backpacked the John Muir Trail this summer in the High Sierra in California. To us, the Nanocamper is great. It is a luxury to sit, sleep, cook and eat in a vehicle if the weather is bad, compared to setting up a tent in the rain while backpacking. It is nice to be able to get at and use things without having to move many items out of the way, as is typical in car camping.

In hindsight, it would have been a good idea to post this thread as I actually built it, instead of afterward, but better late than never.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
There are photos and videos of the Ecamper pop top at the Ursa Minor site, but I’ll post some photos here. It is a pop top similar to the pop tops on the old VW campers, that pops up at an angle. At the front of the pop top (near the windshield) it pops up about 18” inside. At the rear of the vehicle, it pops up about 36” inside. (Those are the dimensions for my pop top - apparently the newer Ecampers pop up somewhat further.) The inside sleeping space is about 7’ by 4’, plenty enough for my wife and I, and I am 6’4”. As written before, you can access the sleeping area from inside the vehicle by going up through the hatch (where the sunroof glass used to be), or it can be accessed from the outside via a ladder. It isn’t easy to get full photos of the pop top inside without a really wide angle lens (which I no longer have), but here are some photos to help understand what it is like inside the pop top.

There are two hold down mechanisms near the front that must be opened to be able to open the top. You flip up the black handle, which releases the silver part, which can then be flipped up:





The actual unlocking happens on the inside. Looking up through the hatch on the inside with the top down, you can see red webbing pull cords on both sides. They are normally kept tucked away underneath the mattress and are not visible, but I pulled them out for these photos:





When you pull these pull cords, they unlock the top and it can easily lifted at the back. It has a scissors hinge and a strut to help left it. You can either push it up through the hatch or stand on the tailgate and lift it from the rear. Here are the mechanisms that the pull cord releases:



This is looking up through the hatch with the top up:



This is looking forward toward the foot end. The rectangular piece at the foot end can be lowered exposing a screen, letting in more light and airflow if so desired:



Here is an older picture I took looking up through the hatch toward the rear. The water proof fabric is zipped down and the insect screening is in place. Also, a vertical prop pole is shown swung down into place to keep the top from coming down, which would be important if you put some items on an optional roof rack on the pop top:



Here is a shot standing in the opening, showing one of the two panels that slide into place to close up the opening. I normally just keep them slid under the mattress when driving, but they could also be left in the opening:



One of the panels is now slid and dropped into place:



A padded piece sits on top of the panel to complete the mattress (lots of little down feathers from my down sleeping bag):



Here is looking up through the opening and the other padded piece is visible, along with one of the gooseneck LED lamps. The shiny reflection on the right is from the panel that is in place in the opening:



Here is a shot looking forward toward the foot end. Visible is an LED area light, a strap to hold one of the pads, and the other pad still held up on the ceiling. The black clip near the light holds the prop-up rod when it is not in use:



Now both panels and pads are in place. Normally we just use down sleeping bags, which can be left up top, even with the top down.



Vertical prop post, REI schwag bags for loose items, and partially open canvas:



Looking back up into opening with panels removed and pads held on ceiling. Top of picture has a switch in it with a small reminder LED light so that you can turn off the LED lights in the pop top if you left them on and lowered the pop top:



There are more pictures, videos and details at the Ursa Minor website. The only modifications I made so far to the Ecamper pop top was the addition of the REI schwag bags for storing small items while sleeping, and the re-wiring of the LED lighting in the pop top. As delivered by Ursa Minor, the pop top LED lighting is connected to the starting battery. I re-wired it to run off the LiFePO4 house battery that I added.
 

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well done. very well done.
 

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Amazing

Glad to see it finished. You really came through with this build. Thanks for sharing the early photos with me and happy to see it come to completion. The attention to detail is amazing. I'm jealous of all your electrical work and fine craftsmanship. Hope the JMT was as good as I hear. I'm out East now along the Appalachain Trail in Asheville, so hit me up when you venture out here. It will be fun to swap build stories in person. Looking forward to your adventure stories aboard the nano camper.
 

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Wow!

Well, our kids are all grown up now and the wife and I have talked about getting the eCamper on our 2011 EX, but it is difficult for us to wrap our minds around the high cost of putting a permanent popup on the E, so we flip flop between the eCamper and getting a gobi rack and adding a roof mounted popup, so we could take the popup with us on another vehicle (should the E give up the 'ghost').

Well, great, thanks to you, we'll have to rethink this! :) LoL

WOW, your set up looks amazing.

Nicely done. Jer
 

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Discussion Starter #8
BTW, MTBEcamper77's interior build is designed to be easily removable, and when removed, it leaves the Element in its stock form. I think that really makes a lot of sense for the vast majority of users, especially when some of the pieces are designed to be removed and used at a campsite, and when many users need to use their Element as a daily driver and to haul things. I really hope he can make it into a commercially viable product, and I can see that it would also work well for Elements that don't have the Ecamper conversion, as it can provide a sleeping surface downstairs.

For me, once I saw the Ecamper conversion at Ursa Minor's website, I knew I wanted to buy an Element and design an interior that would stay permanently in the vehicle and use the Element as a travel/RV/camper vehicle. It is still usable as a daily driver, but with the cabinetry in place, it is not so usable for hauling random large things or for carrying more than a driver and one passenger. We have other vehicles for that, and I'll probably add a hitch to the Element for pulling around a utility trailer to move large things.

The cabinetry is very strongly attached to the metal body of the Element along the floor and walls. Having said that, all of the cabinetry is installed in such a way that it is completely removable, and I still have all of the plastic trim pieces, rear seating, seatbelts, etc., that could technically be reinstalled to bring the Element back to essentially stock form (at least downstairs). I could probably get all of the cabinetry removed in less than two hours, if I needed to (I know this based on installing and removing the cabinetry multiple times as I built it, fitted it, removed it for sanding and varnishing and reinstalling it).

The main reason I designed the cabinetry to be removable was not because I was planning to remove it on a regular basis, but because some cabinetry might need to be removed for maintenance, such as access to the top of the rear shocks. Also, the mounting pad for the Dometic refrigerator pantry slide covers the access panel in the floor that allows access to the top connections and hoses on the gasoline tank, so that mounting pad needs to be removable if the gasoline tank needs to be accessed from above for service.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, great, thanks to you, we'll have to rethink this! :) LoL
Sorry!

Well, our kids are all grown up now and the wife and I have talked about getting the eCamper on our 2011 EX, but it is difficult for us to wrap our minds around the high cost of putting a permanent popup on the E, so we flip flop between the eCamper and getting a gobi rack and adding a roof mounted popup, so we could take the popup with us on another vehicle (should the E give up the 'ghost').
The Element is a reliable vehicle, but after all of the effort I put into this project, if the engine or transmission or another costly item needs major repair or replacement, I'm pretty sure I would have it done.
 

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as a fellow 6'4"er, how tight does it feel in there on a rainy day?
 

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Sure you are! hehe. :)

We got our E new in 2011. I had been wanting one for several years and heard they were discontinuing the E, so I got rid of my Fit and joined the E club! I plan on keeping it as long as I can, or until the MI salt eats it up.

I didn't see the passenger seat 'hole covers' in your photos that irsa minor sells (well, used to sell, I guess as of 2013 they are discontinued for 'redesigning').



Question: I know the back needs to be open above the portal to get into the ecamper, but did you put any pullout seats or bed or... between the isles?

Ok, I just fwd the thread link to my wife and she now wants your E... just send me the plans so I can start the build. LoL. Jer


as a fellow 6'4"er, how tight does it feel in there on a rainy day?
Same here! 6'4"
 

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Discussion Starter #12
as a fellow 6'4"er, how tight does it feel in there on a rainy day?
Remember that my wife and I are used to sleeping and functioning in smallish backpacking and mountaineering tents in the mountains in adverse conditions, so take my answer with a grain of salt.

There are two parts to the question:

1) How tight is the upstairs sleeping area in the Ecamper conversion? The sleeping area is 7' X 4', and the tent walls above the mattress are vertical, so there is plenty of room for us to sleep. Basically, it is roomier than a backpacking tent with a 7' X 4' floor area, as backpacking tents almost always have walls that slope inward above the floor, essentially taking away area. In the Ecamper conversion, if one person wants to remove their half of the hatch panel and climb down into the Element, the other person will have to move somewhat out of the way, but it is doable. Some people solve this by using a ladder on the outside of the vehicle to climb into and escape from the sleeping area. I didn't go that route as I knew I wouldn't want to do it in bad weather, and I didn't want to bring along and store a ladder, even a folding one. In terms of sitting up, say to read, in the sleeping area, at my height, I would have to be hunched over. However, a lot of my height is in my torso, so your mileage may vary. Also, the newer Ecamper conversions pop up further than the one I have (maybe I'll get a retrofit someday), and I could probably sit upright in the newer sleeping areas.

With the panels removed from the hatch to the sleeping area, when I stand on the floor of the Element up through the opening, I have plenty of head room so I could get dressed standing up, reach things in the sleeping area and reach things below on the countertops while standing.

2) How tight is the lower area of the Element with the cabinetry added? If you are stuck inside in bad weather, you can sit on the driver seat or passenger seat and talk or read, etc. Because of the design of the cabinetry, the driver seat can't be tilted back far, depending on the fore-aft position of the seat. The passenger seat can be tilted back. For regular use while eating, sorting gear, etc., I have two small folding stools. They are designed to be the correct seating height for using the counters, and can also be used outside with the tailgate as a table in good weather. They certainly are more comfortable than sitting on the ground, a rock or a log when backpacking, but they obviously aren't easy chairs. I've found them to be fine for their intended purpose. The stool acts as the first step to enter the upstairs, with the countertop providing the second step.

The aisle between the cabinetry is about 20" wide, which is the width of some lightweight backpacking sleeping pads (Thermarest NeoAir pads come in 20" and 25" widths). If I were traveling alone and wanted to stealth camp in a city without popping the pop top, I could sleep in my sleeping bag in the aisle if necessary. Also, the port-potti can easily fit in the aisle.

Since our Element has the very low center console, either the driver or passenger can get up (somewhat hunched over) and walk back between the cabinets to get things. In general, I designed access to the cabinets without swing open doors or pull out drawers, which would hamper aisle access in such a small area. The main exception is the Dometic refrigerator, which is mounted on a pantry slide that pulls out into the aisle. The passenger can actually reach and slide out the Dometic and get things from it while seated in the passenger seat.

I'll post photos and details of all of these things as I add to the build thread.

So, based on our backpacking background, the space inside the Element is fine. I wouldn't want to sit inside it for days on end in bad weather, but that is not what we would normally do. In bad weather, we would put on rain gear and go out and hike or backpack, or just drive in the bad weather to get to a new location.
 

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very cool. i have a kelty tn2 backpacking tent, and its smaller than the top portion, and for sleeping i have no issues with it, except for when i stretch out and my head and feet graze the ends. sounds like the pop up would be no issue for me at all

can't wait to see more pictures
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I didn't see the passenger seat 'hole covers' in your photos that irsa minor sells (well, used to sell, I guess as of 2013 they are discontinued for 'redesigning').

So far the rear seat hold down openings haven't been a problem, as when we use stools, one of the stools sits toward the back of the Element, and not on top of the opening, while the other stool sits behind the passenger seat, which is kept slid forward. This allows both people to access the countertops, the Dometic refrigerator, and the cook area behind the driver's seat.

The metal bars in the seat hold down openings provide potential very strong tie-down points for holding bulky cargo when I don't use the vehicle as a camper. I've also thought about making my own coverings for the openings. One possibility is shaping rigid XPS foam insulation

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Owens-Corning-FOAMULAR-150-2-in-x-4-ft-x-8-ft-R-10-Scored-Squared-Edge-Insulation-Sheathing-45W/100320352

into pieces that fit the opening, then adding 1/8" plywood on top for impact resistance, followed up by black vinyl. I'm familiar with shaping, gluing and generally working with XPS foam, and I think this would work, but I have a lot of other little detail work I want to attend to first. I'd use the XPS foam instead of solid wood as it would provide substantial weight savings.

Question: I know the back needs to be open above the portal to get into the ecamper, but did you put any pullout seats or bed or... between the isles?
No, other than the stools discussed above, and the ability for one person to stealth sleep on the floor in the aisle. I was really tight on space, and if I added pullout seats or a bed, I would be giving up storage that was already committed to other uses. I think if you want pullout seats or a bed, then MTBEcamper77's design makes a lot more sense. One possible modification to my passenger side countertop would be an additional panel hinged at the aisle edge of the countertop that then flips over onto the top of the driver side countertop, covering over and blocking off the aisle. That could provide a large sleeping surface, and would even be usable without the Ecamper conversion.

Ok, I just fwd the thread link to my wife and she now wants your E... just send me the plans so I can start the build. LoL. Jer
Eventually the thread should have enough detailed information so that everyone can see how to build something like this if they would like to try.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
In order to proceed with the build, I had to first remove the rear seats, seat belts, plastic panels and flooring to get down to the bare walls and floors. This would allow me to make accurate measurements to solid surfaces, and to figure out where I could solidly attach cabinets and other items.

In this photo of the rear passenger side, the seats and seat attachments have been removed, but the plastic and vinyl wall and floor coverings are still in place:



Panels covering seat attachment hardware as well as the cover over the shock tower are removed:



Lower wall panels have been removed, as well as floor cover for spare tire. Heavy seat attachment hardware has been removed. Seat belt and satellite radio box remain:



Rear seat belt and satellite radio box removed to gain space and save weight. Also removed vinyl flooring that extends to rear of front seats and center console. Vinyl flooring had padding/insulation glued to underside. Plastic panel on pillar forward of window removed, as well as plastic trim above window:



Driver side panels removed, including upper trim panels on sides and top of window:



Side panels and flooring removed along with trim around rear of driver seat, console trim and trim on door sill on driver’s side. Four foot metal ruler laid out to make measurements and to get sense of scale:



Another shot with ruler sideways and with cover over fuel tank connections removed:



Making some measurements and mockups to see how far cabinets can stick out and clearance issues at wheel well and shock tower:



Fuel tank access with panel removed and center console mounting plate. Every photo I have seen of this plate in other Elements shows it rusted. Moisture must condense under the vinyl console and rust the un-protected metal. I later wire brushed it and applied some silver colored rustoleum paint:



Wiring running along the driver side door sill, which is normally protected by a door sill plastic trim piece. I later used this area to run additional heavier duty wiring from the starter battery to the back of the Element:



Using some scrap pieces of cutoff MDF to layout cabinet edges and to deal with floor height changes. The floor is generally flat, but there are some modest height changes as you go from the area around the spare tire forward to the area covered by the vinyl flooring:



Dometic refrigerator set in place to get an idea of clearance around wall projections and wheel well for the refrigerator, as well as cabinet size to enclose the frig. The cabinet would extend rearward to the tailgate and would have to be placed partially over the spare tire well, but the tire would also need to come out of the well, so I would have to deal with that:



The Dometic (also known as Waeco) refrigerator is a model CF-35, widely used in cars, small RVs, on trucks and on boats. It is not an inefficient thermoelectric cooler but is a full compressor refrigerator with the well regarded Danfoss compressor. It can be used as a refrigerator or as a freezer, has digital temperature settings, and is top loading, so cold air doesn't spill out when the door is open. It runs on 120 VAC or 12 VDC. If 120 VAC is present, it will automatically run on that, and not drain the 12 VDC battery. It also has an adjustable low voltage cutoff to disconnect it from the 12 V battery if the battery voltage drops too low, to protect the battery from complete discharge, which would damage a typical lead acid starting battery.

I bought it here:

http://www.americanrvcompany.com/Dometic-CF-035AC110-CF-35-Waeco-CoolFreeze-Portable-Fridge-Freezer-AC110-CF-35-Trailer-Camper-RV

Here is a link to a spec sheet:

http://americanrvcompany.com/assets/images/Dometic/35-CF-specsheet.pdf

As far as I can tell it is essentially equivalent to a much more expensive ARB or Engel refrigerator, although those are built more like a tank. In the past when I have done multi-day trips in a car or SUV, I just took an ice chest along, so this should be a nice upgrade. Worst case scenario, I can just use it as an ice chest if so desired, as it is top loading.
 

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while i had already admired your craftsmanship, i now need to thank you for all the photos of what's under the plastic skins. thanks. they could be very useful, even to those of us not converting to a micro, nano or femto camper.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
while i had already admired your craftsmanship, i now need to thank you for all the photos of what's under the plastic skins. thanks. they could be very useful, even to those of us not converting to a micro, nano or femto camper.
I have plenty more images at higher resolutions, if you need to see additional details. Just let me know. I just wish I had taken photos of what is above the headliner when I had it pulled partially down to run wiring for lighting.
 

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In order to attach the wooden cabinet and wood base pieces to the metal floor and walls of the Element, I decided to use threaded inserts instead of sheet metal screws. I felt they would be better for multiple attachment and removal, compared to sheet metal screws. Threaded inserts are also known as rivet nuts or rivnuts. I ended up using a tool from Harbor Freight (which included some threaded inserts)

http://www.harborfreight.com/45-piece-threaded-insert-riveter-kit-1210.html

and I also bought a tool online that could really apply a lot of force to install the inserts

http://www.rivetnuttool.com

Both tools worked OK, but the second tool, while awkward to use, could apply more force. If I had to do it over again and install more threaded inserts, I would probably get a beefier tool from Astro Pneumatic or another vendor to do the installation. If you were doing many inserts professionally, an air powered tool would make sense.

The threaded inserts for attaching to metal are different than threaded inserts commonly used in woodworking. To see the type of threaded inserts I used for metal, do a search for rivnut or rivet nuts. The big advantage is that they allow you to thread in a bolt in a blind metal panel situation - when you can’t access the rear of the panel to thread a nut onto the end of the bolt. The threaded insert is permanently installed in a hole drilled in the panel, and a bolt can then be screwed into the threaded insert and easily un-screwed. Most of the inserts that I used were 1/4-20 threads, with some 8-32 threads for situations where less holding power was needed. The Harbor Freight tool had both size inserts and nosepieces for installation.

The next step was to decide where to install the threaded inserts and how many to install. The inserts would need to be installed under the cabinets to hold the cabinets to the floor or to hold a sub-frame to the floor to mount the cabinets on, so I had a general idea of where they needed to be inserted. However, I couldn’t just start drilling any old place in the floor or wall, as there could be a reinforcing rib below, various brake and fluid lines, potentially some wiring, or in some cases a second hidden panel a short distance beyond, which would preclude even inserting the rivet nut into the hole.

In this photo of the rear passenger side, the spare tire has been removed. The four red arrows show four 1/4-20 inserts that have been attached to the floor. The blue arrow shows where I drilled a hole, only to find a second panel immediately below, making it not possible to even insert a threaded insert. The green arrow points to a right angle piece of aluminum that I installed to the vertical rear of the spare tire well 3/4” downward that will help support a 3/4” wood sub frame that cabinets will attach to. Additional holes and plastic inserts shown in the picture were existing holes/inserts, that had plastic panels, etc., attached that had been removed. Note also that around each hole that I drilled and around the threaded inserts, I used silver rustoleum paint to provide some corrosion protection:



Further forward on the passenger side showing three additional inserts not in the original picture, and the spare tire hold down in the spare tire well. I’m not going to keep adding colored arrows to show the inserts:



Behind the front seat on the driver side. The cover is now in place that covers the access hole to the top of the fuel tank. I have wire brushed and painted with rustoleum silver the formerly rusted center console mount. There are several inserts shown:



Additional images of threaded insert placements on driver side:









At left of picture, a right angle piece of aluminum is bolted in place at the rear of the spare tire well to hold up a wooden sub-frame:



Passenger side threaded inserts, along with routing of wiring and rear windshield washer tubing that is normally hidden under plastic sill plate on door frame:



Spare tire back in place in spare tire well:



Next four images have two inch long 1/4-20 bolts temporarily screwed into threaded inserts to clearly depict locations of the threaded inserts:









The vinyl floor covering with the padding/insulation attached beneath was lowered into place, and a razor was used to cut through the vinyl and padding at the locations of the bolts screwed into the threaded inserts. After removing the bolts, this would allow cabinets above the vinyl floor/padding to be bolted down to the metal floor below via the threaded inserts. The red wiring is some additional wiring that I had installed:





 

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Holy mother of E campers...

Are the words "Here goes nothing..." heard often when in your presence?
I am envious not only of your Element, but also of your skill set.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Holy mother of E campers...

Are the words "Here goes nothing..." heard often when in your presence?
I am envious not only of your Element, but also of your skill set.
Thanks for the kind words. Wait until you see the details of my house 12 V electrical system, wiring, switches and assorted items.
 
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