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I replaced one of the rear shocks today, but still need to do the other. Problem is that the lower bolts are rusted to the shock bushings. I don't want to have to go through the same ordeal on the left side as I did on the right (see below), so I'm going to stop and solicit the group's wisdom on how I can do this easier on the other side.

Here is what I tried, why I think it failed, and what I finally had to do to get the first one done (hint: not pretty).

1. penetrating oil: this just plain did nothing. I tried Liquid Wrench and then P B'laster. After I finally had the first shock off (and the car drivable again) I actually did an autopsy on the bushing by cutting it in half length-wise in my metal shop. Absolutely no sign of any oil penetration - and believe me, it had MANY hours to do its job.

2. heat: I used a MAPP torch to heat it up as hot as I could get it. No dice.

3. impact wrench: I even bought a new impact wrench (600 ft-lb !!!), but the rubber surrounding the steel bushing just absorbs the shock :(

4. breaker bar: a combination of the rubber bushing just twisting, and the fact that I couldn't get any decent travel on it (I had the E jacked up, and there isn't a ton of room under there).

5. sawzall: this was my last resort and the thing that finally worked. I cut both sides of the bolt, on the inside of the flanges. It was nerve-wracking because I wanted to be sure to not damage the flange surfaces. It worked out OK, but I still had to use a vice-grip to back out the threaded portion of the bolt from the threaded part of the flange. Again, very nerve-wracking - had to be careful to not ruin the threads inside the flange.


So, anyone have any experience with getting these dastardly bolts out? Any advice on how to do this easier would be hugely appreciated.
 

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Since no one has given you a reply, I guess you're stuck with me.

Man vs Bolt. I love it. This is a war that has been raging for hundreds of years. I really get pumped up for these battles. Being short and relatively strong, feats of strength in tight quarters is one of my few, some say only, forte. I fought one yesterday while changing the differential fluid for the first time. I employ a number of strategies and techniques, I'll cover a few of the more basic principles...

When you first start battling a nut/bolt, you don't want to show your best stuff straight off. You got to feel each other out, like a couple of Heavyweight boxers in the first round. I like to start out lefthanded, so as to give the bolt a false sense of security. Then I switch to righty, summarily demoralizing the poor thing. I call this the Princess Bride technique.

I cannot emphasize enough the importance of swearing. And none of the modern, politically correct stuff, if you know what I mean. Go ahead, call it a **********. Get creative. Everything is fair game. "Your momma was a snowblower!" is one of my favorites.

As a kid, I grew up watching the WWF and Hulk Hogan. Remember when the Hulkster would spend more energy posing than on his opponents? Wage a psycholocal battle! Rip off your t-shirt and start a pose-down. Let Hulkomania run wild! Apply war paint with some grease. This has the added benefit of stopping your wife from interrupting every so often (trust me on this one). And don't forget to remind the litle Hulkomaniacs out there to say their prayers and take their vitamins. After all, it's about the children (by this time the neighborhood kids WILL be gathering).

And finally, know how to celebrate a hard fought victory. I like the "Tim the Toolman Taylor" technique. Pound your chest and grunt like a caveman. Go on for a good 5 minutes or so. Teach it a lesson it won't soon forget. It's fun being a guy, you earned it.
 

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Best. Reply. Ever.:lol::lol::lol:
 

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Funny! :D

Anyway... to a real answer... yes, the Sawzall technique is about the only dependable method for high-mileage lower shock bolts if you live where they use chemicals for icy roads. I haven't done our E yet - it's coming soon, tho' - but on our 15-y-o Miata I had to cut every corner in the same way. Ugh.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks for the replies mike and poohbah. I finally bit the bullet and did the other one. It's not so bad if you just go straight to cutting and skip all of the methods you know are gonna fail. Only took about 90 minutes this time. I also was careful to use anti-seize compound when I reassembled it - pretty much guaranteeing that *I* will never be the one who has to loosen them in the future (the universe is funny like that).
 

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front lower shock bolts on every other honda are the same.... bushing always spins. torch, sawzall, cut off wheel, dynamite, your choice...
 
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