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Although the improvements are fairly minimal on a boxy design like the Element, I notice that myself and several others on this forum make every effort to squeeze precious mileage out of our Hondas. What struck me as odd is that many people who make tons of mods overlook the little aerodynamics tricks that may very well grab you a few percent more efficiency.

DRAG DUE TO WAKE TURBULENCE
The sudden end of the Element (geometrically speaking) causes flow separation that causes wake turbulence and a pressure drop, both of which contribute to drag. Clearly we cannot add a full 'boat tail' to streamline the body, but one could certainly replace their spoiler with a small fairing that curves down to reduce vortex shedding into the wake from over the roof. The same would go for the bottom, under the bumper. I notice that the sides are already lightly curved, and adding anything extra would most likely block the door or reduce visibility, so we'll leave that alone.

DRAG DUE TO TURBULENCE IN WHEEL WELLS
Obviously, we can't do away with the wheel wells if we ever want to turn or change a tire. Some people use fairings to cover the wheel wells in an effort to cut down on turbulence that the discontinuity in the body shape causes. I do believe there is a simpler, more aesthetically pleasing solution. Adding small (nearly unnoticable) vortex generators to the leading edge of the wheel wells would induce vorticity in the flow past the wheels. Induced vorticity means more energy in the flow, and a propensity for the vortex axis to stay pointed towards the rear of the vehicle, instead of into the wheel well.

BUMPER/GRILL DRAG
As some of you know, a high pressure area builds in front of the vehicle while moving forward. A large grill area exacerbates the situation by making it easier for the flow to become stagnant, as there is an indentation of sorts where the grill is located. Air flowing through the grill enters into the engine compartment, which without splash pans on the bottom, causes the air to exit underneath or through the wheel wells in a turbulent fashion. The simple answer is to make a smoother front end with minimal grill area- whatever is required for cooling, and that's all.



I'll begin experimenting with a few of these ideas. I hope you do, too.
 

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Although the improvements are fairly minimal on a boxy design like the Element, I notice that myself and several others on this forum make every effort to squeeze precious mileage out of our Hondas. What struck me as odd is that many people who make tons of mods overlook the little aerodynamics tricks that may very well grab you a few percent more efficiency.

DRAG DUE TO WAKE TURBULENCE
The sudden end of the Element (geometrically speaking) causes flow separation that causes wake turbulence and a pressure drop, both of which contribute to drag. Clearly we cannot add a full 'boat tail' to streamline the body, but one could certainly replace their spoiler with a small fairing that curves down to reduce vortex shedding into the wake from over the roof. The same would go for the bottom, under the bumper. I notice that the sides are already lightly curved, and adding anything extra would most likely block the door or reduce visibility, so we'll leave that alone.

DRAG DUE TO TURBULENCE IN WHEEL WELLS
Obviously, we can't do away with the wheel wells if we ever want to turn or change a tire. Some people use fairings to cover the wheel wells in an effort to cut down on turbulence that the discontinuity in the body shape causes. I do believe there is a simpler, more aesthetically pleasing solution. Adding small (nearly unnoticable) vortex generators to the leading edge of the wheel wells would induce vorticity in the flow past the wheels. Induced vorticity means more energy in the flow, and a propensity for the vortex axis to stay pointed towards the rear of the vehicle, instead of into the wheel well.

BUMPER/GRILL DRAG
As some of you know, a high pressure area builds in front of the vehicle while moving forward. A large grill area exacerbates the situation by making it easier for the flow to become stagnant, as there is an indentation of sorts where the grill is located. Air flowing through the grill enters into the engine compartment, which without splash pans on the bottom, causes the air to exit underneath or through the wheel wells in a turbulent fashion. The simple answer is to make a smoother front end with minimal grill area- whatever is required for cooling, and that's all.



I'll begin experimenting with a few of these ideas. I hope you do, too.
Just be careful of ruining the aesthetics of the machine. :lol: Let form follow function.
G.J.
 

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Someone here, I don't remember who blocked off the upper grill, while not being a great idea, it does follow function. The only working ones I've seen to get rid of the drag or flow seperation is the addition of trisngular spoilers on the back of a car and rear wheel wheel-well skirts that block off most of the wheel well, then putting smooth plastic along the underside of a car moulded to the pieces like the exhaust and drive shaft to allow them to play while smoothing the underside. They all cost way more than the car to do right though.:)
 
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