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So, we've been kinda half ass tracking our oil pressure switch failures and it seems even OEM Honda switches are not what they used to be. I did a little testing with the OEM switch, poked around the web and found this. Specifically the A2-6811. I bought one to test and it is currently installed on my E and working. VTEC does not know the difference. I had to use an adaptor to go from SAE to metric and made a plug to go from stock to spade connectors. I have contacted Dwyer to see if they can make them with metric thread and what kind of production numbers it would take. Fingers crossed.
 

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Just as I suspected they would need hundreds per year to make a production run worthwhile.

If anyone is interested in testing this switch, it can be done with an adapter like this. It will add another o-ring to the equation but as long as it not over torqued it should be fine. I hand tightened it and it hasn't leaked a drop. The oil pressure switch plug will need to be changed to spade terminals. Polarity does not matter. If you want to go back to oem or if the plug is broken you can repair it with this. I tested the oem switch and it opens the circuit at about 24 psi and closes at around 18 psi. I set the Dwyer switch at 24 psi. It's adjustable from 15 to 100 and is extremely accurate. Opens and closes at almost exactly the same psi. I don't believe there are any performance gains to having an adjustable pressure switch since it is simply an input for the ecu to tell if there's oil pressure or not.

What peaked my curiosity was us getting just a few thousand miles out of a pressure switch and I wanted to find out why. I had a handful of new, used and failed ones. Tested them and found some of the used ones would stick intermittently. The circuit would open when pressure was applied and not always close when pressure was released. I cut one open to see what's inside.



From left to right, oil pressure is introduced through the hole, an o-ring seals that disk with a movable membrane in the center. Above that is the other disk with the plunger in the center. Another o-ring seals the cap with the switch inside.



The contacts on the switch are what are failing.



The Dwyer pressure switch is rated at a million cycles. My main concern is the temperature limit.



Installed.
 
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