Honda Element Owners Club banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Normally, I would do them myself- and I have twice, as winters in Vermont are brutal on the brake systems- and I drive it very little in summer.

This spring, both rear calipers were seized- or nearly so.

Left it at the local garage and just got it back. Two new sets of rear calipers, rotors and ceramic pads, plus installation (1.5 hours)

$401.95

Given the thrashing they take in the winter, that was a real bargain!!

Yeah, yeah, the parts aren't OEM- but the OEM didn't last that long anyway.

I was waiting to see what 2011 would bring for a new E or replacement, but now the pressure to trade is off.

Someone needs to invent a spray for those of us up north that will repel the salt and road grime, so our E's can last forever!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Your calipers might last longer if you take out your caliper pins every year or so and lube them.

Did they really install 2 sets of rear calipers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
Your calipers might last longer if you take out your caliper pins every year or so and lube them.

Did they really install 2 sets of rear calipers?
The last time , I couldn't reseat the rubber boots , no matter what I did , nothing , took 1 hour to finally get it back in , was I pissed .....................
Must've done it a thousand times , I guess the odds caught up to me ?

RUBY
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,390 Posts
Your calipers might last longer if you take out your caliper pins every year or so and lube them.

Did they really install 2 sets of rear calipers?

The E's rear brake system is quite complex with disc brakes for 'pedal action' and a quasi drum for the e-brake.

I am glad to be living in Suttern Kaliffornniaaaa...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
40K miles and the worst life you can imagine-

95% use in Vermont winters with all the salt, sand, freeze/thaw, etc. and virtually no summer mileage.

When I did my tire changeovers, I would completely tear apart the rears and brush/file/spray all components to try to make them last.

Servicing the calipers themselves is a little more than I want to take on.

Sure is nice to see everything behind the rear alloys nice and shiny!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
brakes

The problem with these is not the pins its the design of the pad carriage. The ears of the pads ride on little stainless steel shims and the open design lets dirt and crap get in there then the pads push against the rotor and dont let off. I just did all 4 rotors and pads,... again... one side on the rear wore the pad off, the other still had 50percent left.

I have a bad wheel bearing to do back there now!!! geat...
 

·
Registered
2008 Element EX AWD
Joined
·
2,817 Posts
Yeah, the joy of those boots.
If you're talking about the caliper guide pin boots, they aren't hard to get seated.

If:
- the boots are new and correctly oriented.
- the boots and pin guide holes aren't so over-packed with lubricant that they balloon up when you try to seat the pin.
- the seats of the casting that they fit into are completely cleaned of dirt and corrosion.

When remove the pins, and then the boots, if the boots stick to the caliper casting, those seats need cleaning, and the rubber where the corrosion occured is probably pitted.

It's worth spending the $2 to replace those boots with new ones whenever you pull the guide pins for polishing and reinstallation (it's worth the $12 to replace the whole set of hardware if it's corroded). New shiny brake hardware just plain works better.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top