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Discussion Starter #1
I have an AWD 2008 EX. I took my E into my mechanic because of a grinding noise from the rear passenger wheel (obvious scoring/grooves on the rotor, too). He says the caliper is seized, so I call the dealer to bring it in because it should be a warranty repair. The dealer says the caliper is fine and that the brake pad didn't release correctly and has caused the damage, not the caliper. Is that even possible? Isn't the caliper the moving part, not the pad?

Of course the dealer wants to do pads and rotors (non-warranty obviously).

Who do I believe? How can I tell? I'm a little handy, but not a home mechanic.

Thanks for any advice you can give me.
 

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Thair is a great right up on doing the job in the how to or F & Q section. The sliders or pin's probly froze causind you'r pad to stick, I do my brakes 2 to 4 time's a year ( visuel check and lube slider's so on ) it's not hard and only takes an hour or so to do. I do however recomend a service manuel.. Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thair is a great right up on doing the job in the how to or F & Q section. The sliders or pin's probly froze causind you'r pad to stick, I do my brakes 2 to 4 time's a year ( visuel check and lube slider's so on ) it's not hard and only takes an hour or so to do. I do however recomend a service manuel.. Good luck
I hate to be a stupid newbie, but I can't find the article you're talking about...
 

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FAQ / How To's , It,s on the top of the page next to USER CP and MEMBERS LIST. Im not savey with computer's (or spelling) so I don't no how to post a link or any of that jazz but it's thair im looking right at it as I type. Good luck and welcome..
 

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This is the link to the front pads. ( thanks to Larry for a nice job and wright up ) It will show the sliders clearly. The rears are almost the same, but smaller.

Dom
 

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I would say you actually have an honest mechanic you are dealing with. The reason I say this is because the caliper is the most expensive part of the brakes and if he said it is fine, believe him. Calipers do not move, the piston inside the caliper is what moves. The piston presses against the brake pad on the inside of the rotor and this causes the inner pad to press against the rotor which in turn causes the outner pad to also press against the rotor.

The pads rest between 2 slide rails. If these get dirty and gummed up with dirt and brake dust then the pads might stick and continuously rub against the rotor causing lots of damage. Even if the piston releases the pad can remain against the rotor. As was pointed out, a little maintenance is all it would take to avoid this.

As Dom said, the rear brakes are as simple to do as the fronts. It takes some basic tools to perform this repair. if you are not comfortable doing this then have the mechanic do it for you.



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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the link, I was looking for an article that was rear specific. I guess there's not much difference.

I guess I should take the wheel off and check it myself to determine what's what. Can I check the caliper just by taking it off the rotor and pressing it in with a c-clamp? If it moves in it should be OK, right?

From reading through some threads, it seems like it probably is the slider pins that need to be cleaned and greased as well as the area the pads move along inside the caliper. That the pad has jammed in there and that has caused the damage. Does this sound correct to people?
 

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Thanks for the link, I was looking for an article that was rear specific. I guess there's not much difference.

I guess I should take the wheel off and check it myself to determine what's what. Can I check the caliper just by taking it off the rotor and pressing it in with a c-clamp? If it moves in it should be OK, right?

From reading through some threads, it seems like it probably is the slider pins that need to be cleaned and greased as well as the area the pads move along inside the caliper. That the pad has jammed in there and that has caused the damage. Does this sound correct to people?
Yes, use the old pad and the c-clamp to press the piston back into the caliper. The pad doesn't stick to caliper, it gets stuck on the sliders which are attached to the bracket that the caliper is mounted to.

Here is a picture showing where to grease. Yes it is the front brakes, but they are similar enough. :)



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Same thing happened to me, rear caliper stuck but non-warrantied. My experience with the dealer on it was brutal. At least you had a non-dealers opinion before you went to the dealer. My thread related to this is "Brake Question" in Problems & Issues. I drove old cars most my life and got laxed on looking at brakes because of having a warranty. I paid for it. I could probably have seen it this past summer and hedged it a bit if I just pulled the wheels and looked like someone else said.
 

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i've replaced 3 frozen element calipers, Right rear on my 05 EX AWD, right rear on my wife's 06 EX AWD, right rear on a customer's 05 EX AWD. it happens...
 

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Normal wear

Yes, all the left rear caliper slides corrode up and cause the rear pads to wear out quicker than the front if you live in the snow belt. Caliper is fine, just be sure to clean and lube the slides properly with the proper grease (I prefer Permatex brake caliper lube).
 

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Yes, all the left rear caliper slides corrode up and cause the rear pads to wear out quicker than the front if you live in the snow belt. Caliper is fine, just be sure to clean and lube the slides properly with the proper grease (I prefer Permatex brake caliper lube).
The only rear caliper "slides" are the caliper guide pins.

The parts most likely to corrode aren't those pins, but the brake pad retainers that act as bearings for the ends of the brake pads. Though they are made of stainless steel, the pad backings are a dissimilar metal. A combination of grease, road salt and moisture will cause a galvanic transfer of the pad backing metal onto the stainless surface and roughen the pad backing with oxidation until the pads bind.

The most frequent cause of calipers seizing is interior corrosion caused by brake fluid absorbing moisture from the air at the master cylinder.

It's worth the small cost to replace the shims, pad retainers, springs and the caliper pin boots and whenever replacing the pads. Honda includes most of these parts except for the caliper guide pin boots with their pad kits, but most of the aftermarket manufacturers don't include any. Figure $8-10 per axle for these "extra" parts.

When lubing the caliper guide pins, remove the pins, then the boots. Note that the upper and lower pins are different. Clean the pins and the pin cavities of the caliper casting of old grease before relubricating and reassembling.

Unlike the front pad springs, the rear pad springs don't apply direct force force to retract the pads. The rear brake pads get retracted through a combination of the discs expanding and then contracting due to heat, the discs being slightly non-true, air turbulence between the pad and disc surface, and side vibration from changes wheel position. A small amount of elasticity in the caliper pin boots combined with air trapped in the lower caliper guide pin cavity that acts like a shock absorber helps to retract the caliper piston. Don't overlubricate the pad retainers; excess exposed grease traps road grit, brake dust and salt, making it harder for the pads to move away from the disc.
 

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i've replaced 3 frozen element calipers, Right rear on my 05 EX AWD, right rear on my wife's 06 EX AWD, right rear on a customer's 05 EX AWD. it happens...
I've got an '03 E. I just had my dealer tell me my right rear caliper needs to be replaced. Honda wanted $640 for rear brakes and rotors. PLUS about $170 for the caliper ! I went to a Car-X brake shop ( that has done work for my other cars ), and they said they didn't see a problem, they also did my brakes, front and back, for $300 bucks less than my dealer quoted me.

What's the deal with the right rear caliper going bad ? ? ?
 

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Stuck Left Rear Caliper

I seem to have the same problem on the left side of my E. There was an awful grinding sound so I picked up new pads and rotors and replaced them on both rear corners. The left pads were worn down to the metal backing plate, but the right pads were almost like new. After the job was done, I took the ele out for a spin and within a half mile I heard the left rear brakes sticking again.

My new plan is to replace the left rear caliper on Wednesday and put new pads on again too. Does this sound reasonable? Are there any other suggestions? Should I replace both rear calipers while I am at it?

Also I had a question about the rotor retaining screw. Are these necessary? After I removed them with an impact driver they didn't seem to go in with the replacement rotor so I left them off. Most of the cars I have had had floating rotors so I didn't think it was a big deal. Should I be concerned?

Thanks in advance for the advice.
 

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I seem to have the same problem on the left side of my E. . . . The left pads were worn down to the metal backing plate, but the right pads were almost like new. After the job was done . . I heard the left rear brakes sticking again.

My new plan is to replace the left rear caliper on Wednesday and put new pads on again too. Does this sound reasonable? Are there any other suggestions? . . .
The left side of a road vehicle gets more exposure to water, salt and road debris from oncoming traffic than the right side, so corrosion and fouling of the left side brake components is often more severe.

Unless you replace all the brake system components at a wheel with new ones, cleaning and lubrication of the reused parts is critical. You should expect there to be some noise after a partial replacement until the new parts have a chance to wear in to match the older parts.

Did you clean and lap the new rotors after replacement, and measure them for parallelism? If you still hear a grinding noise it's not from a new brake pad dragging across a clean rotor surface. A new or re-cut rotor will have a slightly roughened surface that will cause a slight dragging sound as the break pads are ground down by the roughness.

With rotors that aren't resurfaced, the cast groove that's on the hub edge of the rotor braking surface often is unmachined and rough. New pads overhang this groove, and during the rapid initial wear-in, are noisily ground away until the pad or roughness gets worn down.

Did you clean and re-lubricate the caliper guide pins, replace their boots, and the replace and lubricate the pad springs and retainers? Unless all these parts are clean and lubed, even a good caliper may not have enough outward force applied to the piston to allow the pads to move away from the rotor. Ironically, a new disc that is too flat may contribute to this problem.

I think what you are calling the retaining screws may be the screws in the holes provided to use with bolts to pry the rotor plate off the hub. Those screws' function are to protect the threads of those holes, not to fasten the rotor plate. Replace the old screws with new ones and use anti-seize compound.
 
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