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Discussion Starter #1
I've been trying to reduce the blind spots on my E - since they're considerable, and the height of the car and the design of the seats/pillars/headrest, etc. makes looking over my shoulder not as efficient as in most cars. I found that I had to really strain my neck and look,

I tried adjusting the mirrors as per some of the tutorials posted here, and really didn't like it for some reason... Personal preference, but I need to see my whole side in one mirror rather than having it split between the rear-view and the side-view.

So my attempts moved to improving my side-mirrors. I tried the stick on convex mirrors, and now the Multivex full mirrors.

Here's the stock view.
They offer the most correct distance representation (stock mirrors are perfectly flat on the driver's side), and hey, they're free :) but in traffic, especially at night, I was afraid of merging into someone beside me, or worse, slamming into the guy ahead of me b/c i was too busy looking over my shoulder.

Note the location of the two light posts for comparison with the "after" picture below.



Here's the view with the stick on convex mirrors.
These work great, and are only about $2 each. But they require you to focus on a spot about 2" across - so it's considerably more of an effort than just glancing at a side mirror. And again, not something i want to be doing for extended periods of time while speeding along in dense traffic. (sorry for the pic, my camera didn't like focusing here for some reason - i'm sure the setting sun didn't help)





And finally, here are the Multivex mirrors.
These are full mirror replacements (stick on, but they cover the whole side mirror). They have a progressive curve built in, so closest to the driver they're nearly flat, and furthest away they're very 'curvy', giving you the best range of vision. They're expensive ($85 or so IIRC) but for me worth it.




As you can see, the multivex mirrors show a lot more than the stock ones - look at how much you can see beyond the two light posts.

That's it - just wanted to share :grin:
 

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I can't seem to find any listed for the Honda Element on their website. Can you share any more details on how to get these?
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I can't seem to find any listed for the Honda Element on their website. Can you share any more details on how to get these?
yes, just search for Element. I picked the ones for an '03-09 EX, since the part number seems to be different from a regular E (dunno why, i thought all the mirrors were the same)

http://multivexmirror.net/Results.asp?keywords=element&category=0&secondary=0&Submit=Search


Are those legal? Don't you have a problem seeing with the distorsion? How come none of the mirrors are very clear, are they dirty.
I haven't seen any laws against modifying car mirrors, but i can't be 100% sure...

The distortion does make it a bit... different? it's like into a really large set of the small round stick on mirrors. The directions from Multivex say that you shouldn't stare at the mirrors - just glance to get awareness, and that seems to work great while driving

And yeah, the mirrors are the original 6 year old ones... they're a bit pitted from road grime, small stones, etc. the new ones just have a few fingerprints on them since i was playing with them before taking the pics
 

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My work truck (08 Ford f150)has the standard mirror and then a section below it, same width but only about an inch and a half high, that is wide angle. I found it helpful to tilt the standard mirror down a bit to give me a view of curbs and low objects since I often back in to areas that have low level obstructions like fire hydrants, low walls, etc.

It occured to me today that I could achieve a similar result temporarily with the power mirrors on my EX. Could be useful when parallel parking or when backing into a diagonal space, since I could look down and see the line.

Im a good driver/parker, but my previous car was a Ford Aerostar van and since I drive a truck at work all day it can be hard to adjust to the tighter action of the E.

Anyway I haven't tried it yet, but will and let ya know.
 

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Here's a way to adjust your mirrors to avoid having a blind spot and its free. It takes a while to get comfortable with this approach, but it works. Be prepared to reposition your mirrors whenever someone borrows your E.

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/10q1/how_to_adjust_your_mirrors_to_avoid_blind_spots-feature
I know a lot of people prefer to adjust their mirrors that way, but I've tried that technique in the past a few times and I really don't like it at all, since I find there are just too many times where I actually have to see the sides of my vehicle.

Currently I use a pair of MaxiView blind spot mirrors on my E and I'm quite pleased with their performance.

Here they are. :)
http://www.maxiviewmirrors.com/
 

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Multivex mirrors installed on the driver's side aren't street legal anywhere in the US. :-(

Side mirrors don't address the worst blind sport of the Element- directly behind it. It's also the most dangerous blind spot for a tractor-trailer (though from the number of people who tailgate semi's and don't pass them properly, you'd never know it).

IMHO, it's better to pay attention to other vehicles blind spots most of the time; better to check your own when changing lanes or backing up.
 

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Multivex mirrors installed on the driver's side aren't street legal anywhere in the US. :-(

Side mirrors don't address the worst blind sport of the Element- directly behind it. It's also the most dangerous blind spot for a tractor-trailer (though from the number of people who tailgate semi's and don't pass them properly, you'd never know it).

IMHO, it's better to pay attention to other vehicles blind spots most of the time; better to check your own when changing lanes or backing up.
The worst blind spot in the E is the A pillar. I can't tell you how many people end up in that blind spot and how often I find it necessary to check that spot before proceeding.
 

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The worst blind spot in the E is the A pillar. I can't tell you how many people end up in that blind spot and how often I find it necessary to check that spot before proceeding.
I've never experienced anyone teleporting into an A-pillar's "blind spot", but if it is a known problem for you, the number of times you check should equal, or greater than the number of times you proceed. :)

Seriously, it only requires moving your head from side to side, the same motion as is needed to sweep the side blind spot that every car has.
 

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I've never experienced anyone teleporting into an A-pillar's "blind spot", but if it is a known problem for you, the number of times you check should equal, or greater than the number of times you proceed. :)

Seriously, it only requires moving your head from side to side, the same motion as is needed to sweep the side blind spot that every car has.
My point was that I'd consider that a worse blind spot than the rear. The biggest problem I've had is going around corners in a parking lot and someone walking out of the next row at just the right speed that if I wasn't checking, I would not have seen them until it was to late. :)


I haven't had anyone teleport to the rear yet either.
 

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The biggest problem I've had is going around corners in a parking lot and someone walking out of the next row at just the right speed that if I wasn't checking, I would not have seen them until it was to late. :)
I'd agree, there's definitely quite a large blind spot on the A pillars, most noticeably that damn drivers side A pillar.:)
 

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If you follow the technique in the Car and Driver link above, and go through the period of adjustment to get used to it, it really does work. Vehicles behind you in adjacent lanes are visible in your rear view until they approach your rear quarter. As the rear of their car disappears from your rear view, their front end appears in your side mirror. As they continue to pass you, as their rear end disappears from your side mirror, their front end appears in your peripheral vision.

No need to ever do an over the shoulder check. Looking over your shoulder takes your eyes off what's happening in front of you. Not good.

This technique works on every vehicle, it just takes getting used to. The problem many people have with this method is that the like to adjust their side mirrors so they can see the rear corner of their own vehicle. Why? It's always there, and it's always in the same place.

Here is another tutorial to adjusting your mirrors to eliminate your blind spot, and to avoid over the shoulder checks. Same method as above, just a different version of it.

Mirror tutorial
 

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The problem many people have with this method is that the like to adjust their side mirrors so they can see the rear corner of their own vehicle. Why? It's always there, and it's always in the same place.
Well they are probably like myself and have found that the type of areas they drive in require them to be able to see the rear corner/sides of their vehicle.
 

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My point was that I'd consider that a worse blind spot than the rear. The biggest problem I've had is going around corners in a parking lot and someone walking out of the next row at just the right speed that if I wasn't checking, I would not have seen them until it was to late. :)

I haven't had anyone teleport to the rear yet either.
If a child were to walk behind your Element in a parking lot, unless you happened to be looking through the appropriate side view mirror, you'd never know it was there. In contrast, if you are looking forward, a child of the same height or any adult would be within your field of vision most of the time.

Regardless, parking lots are one of the most dangerous places for clueless pedestrians, and drivers are responsible for being reasonably cautious.

IMHO, those pedestrians who cut through rows of parked cars and those drivers who think that road speed limits apply in parking lots, or who practice "drive through" parking in dual row lots rather than backing out of spaces have poor situational awareness. (Seems like that latter are frequently next to a SUV oriented the other way, and aren't nearly cautious enough unparking - forward motion provides no warning lamps to alert other drivers)

In an attempt to compensate for their unsafe behavior, in addition to moving dead slow and using my mirrors, I've begun using my 4-way flashers and beeping my horn whenever I have to unpark or back up. More than once I've startled pedestrians who weren't paying attention (talking or texting on cellphones) while walking into deadly positions. It may piss them off, but I'd rather they were upset than injured.
 
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