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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Or I guess you could say that I didn't replace the clutch . . . in that this thing feels like a giant paperweight. Followed the instructions (as best I was able to follow the instructions.)

Thing I noticed that was odd was that when I was spinning the left rotor, the right rotor was spinning in the opposite direction (front wheels.) Couldn't figure out why, but was hoping it was a part of the AWD system or something and normal. Now it feels like its not a part of the AWD system and not normal. I didn't crack the transmission case at all.

Anyone? Was really excited to get it bolted back together, but now I'm at a point where I just don't know where to even start troubleshooting.

-Ben.
 

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Seems like you somehow have the transmission in 2 gears. Does the shifter feel like its going into all forward speeds and reverse?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
it goes into and out of all the gears well. When I idle in neutral I don't need the clutch to be engaged. When In any other gear the engine engages with something, but there is tension. When the car is in neutral it won't roll (i'm trying to push it - won't budge a bit.)

-Ben.
 

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The front wheels spinning in opposite directions while not on the ground is a normal function of the front differential. What you need to verify is that both front wheels can be turned by hand in the same direction with the wheels off the ground and the trans in neutral. You will need a helper or very long arms. Next, jack up the rear and be sure each of the rear wheels can be turned freely by hand. If the car has sat for awhile the brake pads can stick to the rotors and feel like they are not going to turn.
 

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From your descriptions it sounds like something is binding the wheels (like brakes as mentioned by RustedWrench) but none of that is related to the clutch, and your descriptions are hard to understand. I think we need more details from you, and please be very descriptive. A clutch install is a lot of labor but its nothing difficult, was there ever anything that gave you trouble or seemed not quite right? (Like having to force something)


When you start the motor, do you notice any change in rpms when you press & release the clutch pedal while the tranny is in neutral? Are there any unusual sounds while the car is running in neutral (clutch pressed & clutch released)?

While running can you rev the motor freely?

With the motor running & clutch pressed, is there any unusual resistance when trying to put the tranny in gear? Do the rpms ever change while trying to shift between gears?

With the motor running, clutch pressed, and tranny in gear, can you release the clutch & smoothly engage the clutch?

If the clutch is engaging & disengaging like it should, and the tranny shifts in & out of gear like it should, then the clutch is most likely operating fine & the issue is somewhere else.

With both front wheels off the ground, turning one will cause the other to spin the opposite direction, that is normal. If you lift both rear tires off the ground and spin one the other will also spin the opposite direction. I think you should try raising only the tires on one side (both pass or both dr side tires only) and then spin a tire. With one front & one rear off the ground from the same side of the vehicle, turning one should cause the other to spin in the same direction. If the driveline is binding at the transmission (you did remove/reinstall the tranny) then it will be difficult to spin the tire because the drive line is stuck, and that could load down the engine & add rolling resistance.

Its still all guesswork until we can get more feedback from you though.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The front wheels spinning in opposite directions while not on the ground is a normal function of the front differential. What you need to verify is that both front wheels can be turned by hand in the same direction with the wheels off the ground and the trans in neutral. You will need a helper or very long arms. Next, jack up the rear and be sure each of the rear wheels can be turned freely by hand. If the car has sat for awhile the brake pads can stick to the rotors and feel like they are not going to turn.
Did this this morning. Front wheels spin independently (when they are individually jacked up.) rear wheels don't spin when jacked up individually.

Rear drive shaft (from transmission coupling to rear diff) has enough play in it that I don't suspect the problem is coming from anywhere forward of the rear differential. I also kept an eye on the shaft when I tried to spin the rear wheels (they each spin about 1-2 degrees before stopping.) and the shaft doesn't move at all. The rotors spin with the wheel until they don't.

coachmde said:
Time to break out the big bucks and get a mechanic
I agree. The big take away from this job is that I should pay for anything more involved than routine maintenance.

Audiophyle said:
~do all this stuff to trouble shoot~
Thanks. This is exactly the type of stuff I was looking for. I was just too overwhelmed to figure out how to isolate the problem.

Engine runs fine in neutral with and without the clutch. I'll try revving it to see if that changes anything.

Also going to jack up the rear together and see if they spin with both off (I can't imagine that they would.) Next step will be pulling the back wheels.

The only thing that has changed back there, is that it has been sitting with most of the weight on the rear for 6 months (how long this job has taken.) and the E brake engaged.

Last thing that is rather odd. The brakes take some pressure when pumped. Don't know if that's related or new, but its information: Going outside to perform the other tests (and thank you all)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Again. Thanks for the help. I needed some next steps and they really worked out:

back wheels were independently seized. When I went to take off the back wheel (impact driver) it rattled the X(assuming caliper?) loose so that the wheel started spinning. For the right I just tapped the back side of the wheel nuckle with a hammer and it broke free.

Now the thing is on the street, but I want to see what I can do to get it back into driving shape:

Option 1: Drive it to a brake place and have them look at it (could say my brakes are making noise or something.)

Option 2: DIY? Is there a way to clean up whatever seized so that I'm rolling smooth again?
 

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Again. Thanks for the help. I needed some next steps and they really worked out:

back wheels were independently seized. When I went to take off the back wheel (impact driver) it rattled the X(assuming caliper?) loose so that the wheel started spinning. For the right I just tapped the back side of the wheel nuckle with a hammer and it broke free.

Now the thing is on the street, but I want to see what I can do to get it back into driving shape:

Option 1: Drive it to a brake place and have them look at it (could say my brakes are making noise or something.)

Option 2: DIY? Is there a way to clean up whatever seized so that I'm rolling smooth again?
When the car sits, especially when the air is humid, you get flash rust on the brake rotors. If it rusts enough it will cause the rotors to stick as you have described.

Here is what I would do. Have somebody apply and release the parking brake a few times while you watch each rear parking brake cable to insure they are applying and releasing freely. If so, and the wheels are now free to turn, just drive it and see what happens. The first few stops will produce a grinding noise as the rust is scraped off the brake rotors but afterward it should be fine. If not, worry about that when the time comes.
 

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the rear rotors are part of the hydraulic brake system. the rear parking drum brakes are part of a cable actuated brake system. the parking brake drums just happen to be located inside the hydraulic brake system rotors.
each system is independent and has it's own means of rusting while not being used. looking at the cable of the parking brake system won't tell you much about how the hydraulic system is working and vice versa.
the point of all this is that, in the rear of the vehicle, you have multiple systems that are subject to rust. calipers/pads could rust on the rotors and shoes/pads could rust inside the drums. if the rear wheels won't rotate, you'll need to check both systems.
 

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Brake cleaner is your friend, spray the hell out of the rear calipers and drum brake.
Take the rear wheel off & you will find a rubber plug on the face of the brake rotor where the wheel mounts, it will have a single slot in it. Be careful to not push the plug into the brake rotor or you will have to remove the rotor to get it back out, but you can pry it out & then spray the hell out of the parking brake system inside the rotor which should help if its still sticking. Sounds like the clutch install was fine, and if you could do that then servicing the rear brakes will be a breeze.

Rear brakes are a hybrid of sorts, stopping is handled by the calipes which are hydraulic. The parking brake is cable driven & is basically a tiny drum brake located inside the rear brake rotor. Brake system is easy to tear down & inspect/clean/replace, just leave the hydraulic lines alone unless you are comfortable bleeding them. Impact screwdriver & a BFH will make rotor removal a piece of cake.
 
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