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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry for this sick photo...but just came back from holidays (dog @ boarding)....after a week @ home i washed them... took them for a walk and saw this on his tail....

wat might this be, should i bring him to a vet immediately or could i get a pet first aid kit?
 

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It's a "hot spot."

You saw it immediately after the bath?

First, I would put the "Cone of Shame" (Elizabethan collar) on your pup and leave it on until he leaves this alone. Dogs can chew a spot raw in a matter of minutes. If you don't have a cone, Pet Smart or other box pet store should have them in stock.

Then I'd gently wash the spot, pat it dry and apply a hydrocortisone spray and anti-septic (I use "Septi-Soothe" from Drs. Foster and Smith). I'd stay away from ointments because the vets generally want the spot to dry and not stay moist.

And then I might give Benadryl -- 1 miligram per 2 pounds of dog. That'd be one 25mg tablet for Gidget (she weighs 50 pounds). I've had this discussion with my vet, who advises keeping Benadryl in a dog's First Aid Kit, but you may want to call yours to confirm appropriateness and dosage.

Does it look or smell infected?

Hot spots are very common this time of year. Could be a seasonal allergy, a flea or other insect bite.

Could be that if you washed the pup a day or more before you noticed the hot spot that it's a result of the dog's coat not being dry. If I don't thoroughly dry Gidget -- with a 4hp groomer dryer -- she is prone to develop a hot spot, often on or around the base of her tail (which they can easily reach to bite).

Keep a close eye on it until it heals or worsens - in which case you should visit the vet. Hot spots are prone to infection so I'd go ahead and call the vet and see how busy they are. If it would take a couple days to get into see them then go ahead and lock in an appointment and see if the hot spot improves before then. This could avoid a more expensive emergency visit.

And if you go to the vet, take pen and paper and have them advise you on outfitting your own Dog First Aid Kit (will be better than a commercial kit).

Among the items I have in Gidget's First Aid Kit is "Septi-Smooth" products from Drs. Foster and Smith and a variety of their "Stop Itch" salves and spray. These came in handy at a campground a couple weeks ago when a camp neighbor's dog developed a hot spot after days of swimming in the lake.

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=3307+12891+580&pcatid=580

Every dog owner should have a cone for their dog, in case they start chewing themselves for whatever reason.

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?pcatid=20208

Good luck!


 

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If you Google "treating hot spots on dogs" all kinds of info comes up.


http://vetmedicine.about.com/cs/dogdiseasesh/a/hotspots.htm

What can I do to treat a hot spot?

The first thing to do is speak with your veterinarian. Due to the rapidity of spread and possibility of deeper skin infection, it is wise to start treatment with your vet. Also, these hot spots can be very painful to the animal -- caution is advised, use a muzzle if need be for your protection.

Shave the area. The first treatment for hot spots is to dry them out and get air to the area. Hair loss is a feature of hot spots, but hair can also mat over the inflamed area, covering up a potentially much more severe and large problem.

Cleanse the area with cool water and a gentle skin cleanser.

Cool compress the area 2-4 times a day with a cool wet washcloth.

Medications - Depending on the severity and size of the hot spot, your veterinarian may prescribe oral antibiotics, topical drying sprays or medications, and/or special shampoos.

Prevention of licking, biting, scratching -i.e. Elizabethan collar

Additional home remedies that can be used until you can see your vet:

tea bag compresses (black or green tea) to help dry the area out. Tea can be used as a wash or as a compress.

Domeboro's (Burow's) solution (aluminum acetate) - available over-the-counter at pharmacies to help dry the skin out. Can be used as a compress or as a spray.

Hydrocortisone creams - Some people advocate using a thin film of an over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream. I would recommend talking to your vet first -- in general, creams and ointments only serve to "gunk up" the area and prevent proper drying if used incorrectly. Also, if the pet licks it, you want to make sure that it isn't toxic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks hiker chick.... we have booked him for a thursday afternoon appointment and monitioring the progress of his wound.....

now he feels he can fight a vacum cleaner and twilightzero :lol:


poor guy was a bit depressed last night and this morning
 

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Excellent! Good to have that appointment in the bag.

Gidget has that exact same cone. All I have to do is hold it up and she puts her head through it. Yes, she's been prone to skin issues (allergies + super thick coat) much of her life (she's now 8 years old).

Coincidentally, I had already followed my own advice because last weekend Gidget began exhibiting symptoms of something she'd experienced at this time last summer: itchy anus and irritated anal glands. So I did what I could for her and made an appointment a couple days ago for today, in case she didn't get better. This morning I decided to take her in.

So Gidget's now on an antibiotic (Simplicef) and a topical to deal with the itching (Tresaderm). She's been on both before and they've been highly effective. Vet said allergies are rampant right now and in a 12-vet practice she alone had already seen 3 allergy-related ear infections today. She said Gidget's situation may have started when she sat on the grass. This was a recurring problem last year so I'll have to keep a close eye on her rear for the next few months. Lotsa butt baths in my future. I'm her personal bidet.

I asked the doc about First Aid items and in addition to anti-septic spray, bandages, vet tape, Pepcid AC (Gidget's prone to acid reflux), Benadryl, Pepto-Bismol (vomiting, diarrhea) she recommended Gold Bond Medicated Powder.

She said the Gold Bond would help dry out a hot spot. And she reiterated that you don't want to put cream or any goop that will make a hot spot even more moist than it already is.

If Gidget suffers a hot spot while we're camping she recommended the Benadryl to deal with itching. She said 1 mg per 2 pounds of dog is standard but that it would be okay to give Gidget 1mg per pound. Benadryl tabs are 25mg.

Just got off the phone with a nurse friend who has a couple Samoyeds and she swears by colloidal silver for its antiseptic properties. She's going to send me a link to an online supplier.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
this guy had sensitive skin when he was a pup..... he still uses puppy bath :grin:

i just dont wanna risk anything with my kids, so thursday is the earliest appt.... but will keep an eye on him, since i will be working from home in the next few days
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the advice hiker chick...saw the vet on thursday (first available day) and determined it was a hot spot...got some special soap and medication and currently administering it......
 

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Happy, We've found a proven remedy for pet skin conditions. I've used this successfully many times on dogs, cats and even chickens.

Go to Walmart and look on the bottom shelf where the vitamins are. Get yourself a bottle of Tea Tree Oil, it's about 8 bucks. Put it in a small spray bottle and spray on the affected area 2-3 times a day. Don't worry about the label saying not to use internally and the pup licking it. That was so they wouldn't have to get it FDA approved and then charge $100 a bottle. I even use it to gargle with for sore throats.

Try it, it really works and good luck.

P.S. This stuff will kill skin cancer, just apply full strength 7-8 times a day.
 

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Excellent! Good to have that appointment in the bag.

Gidget has that exact same cone. All I have to do is hold it up and she puts her head through it. Yes, she's been prone to skin issues (allergies + super thick coat) much of her life (she's now 8 years old).

Coincidentally, I had already followed my own advice because last weekend Gidget began exhibiting symptoms of something she'd experienced at this time last summer: itchy anus and irritated anal glands. So I did what I could for her and made an appointment a couple days ago for today, in case she didn't get better. This morning I decided to take her in.

So Gidget's now on an antibiotic (Simplicef) and a topical to deal with the itching (Tresaderm). She's been on both before and they've been highly effective. Vet said allergies are rampant right now and in a 12-vet practice she alone had already seen 3 allergy-related ear infections today. She said Gidget's situation may have started when she sat on the grass. This was a recurring problem last year so I'll have to keep a close eye on her rear for the next few months. Lotsa butt baths in my future. I'm her personal bidet.

I asked the doc about First Aid items and in addition to anti-septic spray, bandages, vet tape, Pepcid AC (Gidget's prone to acid reflux), Benadryl, Pepto-Bismol (vomiting, diarrhea) she recommended Gold Bond Medicated Powder.

She said the Gold Bond would help dry out a hot spot. And she reiterated that you don't want to put cream or any goop that will make a hot spot even more moist than it already is.

If Gidget suffers a hot spot while we're camping she recommended the Benadryl to deal with itching. She said 1 mg per 2 pounds of dog is standard but that it would be okay to give Gidget 1mg per pound. Benadryl tabs are 25mg.

Just got off the phone with a nurse friend who has a couple Samoyeds and she swears by colloidal silver for its antiseptic properties. She's going to send me a link to an online supplier.

Have you guys seen this thing? http://www.opentip.com/Pet-Supplies/Softecollar-p-1158841.html I used it on one of my dogs who had multiple surgeries over and over again. We still use it once in awhile on Briggsie. It's so much more comfy on them, and on your legs when they walk behind you. It's sponge covered with plastic you can wipe clean and laces on their collar.
 
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