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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Honda isn’t perfect. As good as its K-series engine is, its tensioner has its problems. But Skunk2 has the solution—its Pro Series Timing Chain Tensioner. It’s never been safer to run big cams in your K.

Timing chain tensioners are simple but important. Take Honda’s K-series, for example. The crankshaft keeps the intake side of the chain tight but it’s the tensioner’s job to do so for the exhaust side. Without it, the cams would start spinning but ultimately just sit there doing nothing. Honda’s design incorporates both spring pressure and engine oil pressure. At low engine speeds, when oil pressure is low, the tensioner’s internal spring moves its piston toward the timing chain guide, reducing chain slack. As engine speed and oil pressure rise, the spring relaxes and oil pressure pushes against the piston. But Honda’s spring doesn’t always work as you’d expect, and excess tensioner piston travel and timing chain slack when oil pressure is low is common—especially during start-up when the spring is left to control the exhaust cam slamming shut all by itself. All of this can lead to engine damage, even on unmodified engines. Worst of all, you’ll never know any of this is happening until it’s too late.

The problem is intensified once camshafts with aggressive closing ramps and/or stiffer valve springs are added. When the exhaust valves close while idling or during start-up, the tensioner’s piston slams back toward its housing, which causes its teeth to bash against its ratcheting mechanism. This isn’t a good thing since the ratchet and piston teeth are the only things that prevent the piston from being pushed in too far, which would otherwise lead to a dangerously loose timing chain that can potentially jump teeth, so keeping it intact becomes even more important. Once the piston’s teeth wear down, the safety mechanism’s gone. Meanwhile, as the tensioner’s spring struggles to resist the exhaust camshaft’s closing motion, the timing chain continues to slack, which is obvious by its kinking in the upper region near the camshaft gears. All of this is caused by a spring that’s too weak to counteract the exhaust valves slamming shut and weak, undersized piston teeth that wear from repeated bashing against their ratcheting mechanism. Until now, the solution was to “add a click” to the OEM tensioner, which reduces tensioner piston travel but doesn’t solve the overall problem. Stiffer springs have also been experimented with, but neither solution addresses the bashing effect and potential for worn piston teeth.

Skunk2’s K-series Timing Chain Tensioner fixes all of this. Pro Series Tensioners are machined from high-quality 7075-aluminum, heat-treated, and feature stiffer, OEM-quality springs that prevent the exhaust camshaft from slamming shut at low engine speeds and eliminate chain slack, even under low oil pressure conditions where the factory spring would have been compromised. Skunk2’s tensioner also includes an upgraded 16mm diameter piston (1.5mm larger) with a larger ratcheting mechanism featuring deeper and wider, hardened-steel ratcheting teeth for extra protection—the ultimate fail-safe to ensure against excessive piston travel due to worn teeth. Skunk2’s tensioner also fits tightly against the timing chain guide to ensure against rotational movement, which can exert uneven load against the ratcheting teeth. Even the factory-designed oil passages and check valves are retained, which means the tensioner remains lubricated and pressurized just as Honda intended.




Skunk2's Pro Series Timing Chain Tensioner eliminates the K-series weak link, making it safe to run more aggressive camshafts and stiffer valve springs in any K-series engine.





Honda's K-series tensioner is compromised even further once more aggressive camshafts and stiffer valve springs are added. The consequences, which range from chain slack to jumped teeth, can be enough to cause serious engine damage.




Pro Series tensioners feature a stiffer spring, which eliminates excessive timing chain slack when oil pressure is low—like during start-up and while idling—which is when the OEM tensioner is least effective.




The Pro Series tensioner's piston (right) is 1.5mm larger in diameter than the factory piston. Its larger diameter and stronger and deeper teeth are the ultimate fail-safe for preventing excessive chain slack and jumped teeth.




Pro Series tensioners address both of the factory tensioner's shortcomings: a weak spring and a weak piston. Skunk2 uses an OEM-quality spring that's stiffer than Honda's, which helps counteract the exhaust camshaft slamming the valves shut.




The Pro Series tensioner functions similarly to Honda's but is made of higher grade materials for increased durability, like its ratcheting components.




The primary problem with the OEM tensioner is excessive piston travel. Notice how far the piston travels from its fully extended state on the left to fully compressed on the right.



The Skunk2 tensioner's piston has less travel than the OEM one thanks to a stiffer spring.



As the tensioner’s spring struggles to resist the exhaust camshaft’s closing motion, the timing chain continues to slack, which is obvious by its kinking in the upper region near the camshaft gears.



Notice that chain kinking is eliminated once the Skunk2
tensioner has been installed.

hmm.... your views on this?
 

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Based on what you have written it does not take a mechanical engineer to determine that the replacement chain tensioner is the way to go. I think I will get one. Nice writeup and graphics. It is folks like you that make this forum the best.
 

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I visited the Skunk2 website and was unable to locate the tensioner you are referring to. Perhaps you could could point me in the right direction. Thanks again.
 

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No expert...

I'm not an expert. Therefore can not dispute their claim...
However, I think the photographic "evidence" is a bit misleading. In the top photo is seems fairly obvious that there is NO tension on the chain at all - it is not even ON the right side gear....
I believe in the static state, either tensioner would make the chain taught.

Again, I am not disputing the claim of the original post... Just pointing out my observation of the photos.....
 

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It is more of an issue with aftermarket cams. S2 had A LOT of failures in the chain tensioner due to version one and two of their cams, mainly the stage 2 and 3, not the mild cams. Version three of them got things ironed out. There were hardly any failures with stock cams. The Hybrid Racing TCT would be a better option, but will be difficult to replace without pulling the motor. Hybrid's tensioner has been tested on a bunch of 10000rpm plus motors, including turbo ones, with no issues as of yet. What are you looking to swap the tensioner for? I'm running stock cams with my setup at the moment, but when I swap cams I am changing the tensioner too. That's most likely going to be a full race motor, so thats a different story.:evil:
 

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I just recently changed my timing chain , so may I add a few pointers and disclaimers ...... The chain itself has key chains , that are a different color that line up with the marks on cams and the crank , maybe a honda parts guy can confirm , this chain does not have those marks , there are dots on the cams and if you look at the left cam , you can see the different color link and just below a dot on the cam , you can see it better ( the dot ) on the right cam . Also if i'm not mistaken the timing chain cover has an access cover to the tensioner in question , for a quick change out , I think I was quoted 40 bucks from honda for this tensioner , but mine looked fine and since there was a access cover , I could always change it out later without disassembling everything all over again . The 2.4 is one solid engine and very easy to work on , the chain from honda costs about 85 bucks , hondabonda 9 bucks , the hardest part was getting the crank bolt out .

RUBY

The bottom pic clearly shows , what I was trying to explain , the top pic that chain is so loose , I wouldn't even turn the crank !
 

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I'm not an expert. Therefore can not dispute their claim...
However, I think the photographic "evidence" is a bit misleading. In the top photo is seems fairly obvious that there is NO tension on the chain at all - it is not even ON the right side gear....
I believe in the static state, either tensioner would make the chain taught.

Again, I am not disputing the claim of the original post... Just pointing out my observation of the photos.....
Good points based on your observations.
 

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we need to see the whole picture of all the parts in working order to evaluate the part corectly. from what I can see witch is very little , the top pic just dosent have the botom of the guide pushed out as far as the bottom pic does. . sort of like the guy born with 2 fingers on one hand, peace !!
 

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http://www.hybrid-racing.com/store/index.php/new-items/hybrid-racing-timing-chain-tensioner-for-k-series-engines.html

This is hybrids. I think their design is better due to the fact they used not only closer tolerances than honda and stronger metals, that also put teeth on both sides of the tensioner, which was the main way they slipped from what I understand. The stiffer spring in the skunk 2 TCT just makes the tension more, and puts more stress on the spring and chain than need to be. It doesn't need more resistance, it just needed something that didn't fail. Hence the dual ratcheting and harder metals. Plus the hybrid one looks like it could survive a nuclear hollocaust..:grin:
 
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