Honda Element Owners Club banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Read Only
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know if Honda uses or recommends using spark plug grease on the threads when installing plugs? I removed the plugs on my wife's E to adjust the valves. I was shocked at how much force it took to break them loose. They squeaked really loud as I turned them. That can't be good. When I put it back together, I used a small amount of the grease and torqued the plugs to 18N. Is there anything wrong with using the grease?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
The Honda service manual indicates to use a small amount of anti seize. I wouldn't use regular grease, it isn't up to the temperature or task. Use anti seize - a very small amount (like the size of a ball point pin head) applied to the threads only. Keep it away from the electrode.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response. What I used is the grease that is made for spark plugs. Hopefully, these will not be in there very long. they look terrible, but I did not have replacements. Maybe next weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Thanks for the response. What I used is the grease that is made for spark plugs. Hopefully, these will not be in there very long. they look terrible, but I did not have replacements. Maybe next weekend.
Champion makes a 2 oz. bottle of spark plug lubricant/anti sieze compound, p/n 2612. I bought a bottle about 25 years ago and its still half full. Used it on aircraft engines all the time. Only apply it above the 2nd or 3rd threads and keep it away from the electrodes because it is conductive. Should be available at any airport or tool supply house. HTH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
I read somewhere that most new plugs already have a coating on the threads and only need the anti seize applied if they are removed and reinstalled. Not sure where I read this or if it's accurate but seems like it would make sense that the manufacturers put a coating on the threads at the factory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
As others have said, use anti-seize on the threads. I believe what you mean by "Spark Plug Grease" is "Dielectric" grease. Dielectric grease is made to keep water out of electrical components but allow an electrical connection. It's typically used in the spark plug boot and in light bulb sockets like your taillights.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The stuff that I have does say dielectric on it it is made for spark plugs. I just did not understand why Honda would not use it, knowing how easy it is to damage threads on aluminum. I just thought that they might have some special reason. As a matter of personal preference, i did use it on the threads as directed on the package. Anyway, thanks for the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,234 Posts
The stuff that I have does say dielectric on it it is made for spark plugs.
Yes, it (dielectric grease) is made to apply to the various rubber parts that touch the sparkplug and the sparkplug well to prevent moisture from entering. The stuff you should use on the sparkplug threads is called anti-seize.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
You can usually find anti seize in small "one use" tubes at the auto parts store counter but it needs to be anti seize. Ask for it and they should know what you mean.

Dielectric grease will not do the job for the threads. I don't know if it will hurt but it might eventually cake up and be more of a problem than a help. If it were me I'd pull those plugs ASAP just in case and use the correct product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
Thanks for the response. What I used is the grease that is made for spark plugs. Hopefully, these will not be in there very long. they look terrible, but I did not have replacements. Maybe next weekend.
The stuff that I have does say dielectric on it it is made for spark plugs. I just did not understand why Honda would not use it, knowing how easy it is to damage threads on aluminum. I just thought that they might have some special reason. As a matter of personal preference, i did use it on the threads as directed on the package. Anyway, thanks for the help.
Hehehe, funny stuff. The dielectric stuff is supposed to be used on the part of the spark plug where the boot connects, NOT THE THREADS.

I doubt it'll hurt anything though. Like everybody and their mother has been saying, the stuff you're looking for is called anti-seize. The stuff I have is kind of a copper color and got it at Napa about 5 years ago. Still have just about the entire tube left. You really don't need much.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Oh well...for now, the E runs good. Evidently, the previous owner did not believe in scheduled maintenance. These plugs are the originals and the E has 130,000 on it. They look pretty bad. I'll be replacing them in the next week or so, and I'll be sure to get the correct stuff and do it right.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top