Honda Element Owners Club banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,214 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Really interesting article on rising tire prices in today's Wall Street Journal. It mentions the new tariff on Chinese tires which is already impacting the low-end of the market but the article's focus is on the fact that so many middle to low-end cars come with more expensive tires these days, tires that because of their attributes, such as stickiness, simply don't last as long. And the proliferation of cars from the factory these days that come with V-rated and other high-performance tires.

One of the examples cited is a guy who bought a 2004 BMW with a sports package that included a stiffer suspension, low-profile, high-performance tires and bigger wheels. He's spent $6000 so far replacing wheels and tires that have worn out or been damaged (I can attest to the pothole perils of low-profile tires from my Miata-Toyo experience). He regrets getting the sports package as he had given no thought at the time of purchase to the future expense of maintaining those parts.

I got hooked on superior tires with my 2001 Miata. And so I replaced my stock Element tires with Michelin Cross-Terrain SUVs which I'm hoping will prove to be a long-term value as well as provide constant safety and ride improvement. But it's an expensive decision to go that route, to be sure.

I don't know if this link below will require a subscription to read the entire article but I excerpted as much as I dare.


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB100...981150147524.html?mod=WSJ_hps_MIDDLEFifthNews

What's Inflating Your Car's Tires?

...the tires on his $31,000 Chevy cost more than $500 each. The tires—Pirelli P Zeros—are the same kind found on $250,000 Ferraris.

...One reason for the price surge is tire makers' push to equip new cars with higher-profit specialty tires that can run at higher speeds and feature such high-performance traits as short, stiff sidewalls, which provide firmer handling. As a result, more vehicles like the commuter sedan and the family minivan are arriving from the factory with tires once seen primarily on sports cars like the Porsche Carrera or Chevrolet Corvette.

...large-diameter wheels, a trend that has recently spread to ordinary cars.


:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,390 Posts
............

One of the examples cited is a guy who bought a 2004 BMW with a sports package that included a stiffer suspension, low-profile, high-performance tires and bigger wheels. He's spent $6000 so far replacing wheels and tires that have worn out or been damaged (I can attest to the pothole perils of low-profile tires from my Miata-Toyo experience). He regrets getting the sports package as he had given no thought at the time of purchase to the future expense of maintaining those parts.

...........


I have been aware of these traits for a long time. The trend spreads much deeper. Whenever you buy a high performance version of a car, you are guaranteed to need a more expensive air cleaner, high test fuel, and a much more expensive maintenace schedule. In addition, the high performance variants, by definition, will be more repair prone! Give me a stock K24 with a set of Michelin Hydroedges, and I will be driving long and cost effective for many, many miles. All four of my Hondas are rolling on Hydroedges!!!!

BTW: Consumer reports just voted the Michelin Hydroedge the best all-round-tire available on the market. 90,000miles life expectancy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Tires...

Just be glad you don't ride a sporty motorcycle. Today's "Sport Bike Tires" only last 3,000 - 5,000 miles. Even the "Sport-Touring Tires" I use on my modest bike (Kawasaki ZR-7S) can rarely see 10,000 miles.

Granted, they are sticky, provide great traction and inspire confidence. Although at $130 - $200 per rear tire.... that kind of confidence does not come cheap....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,522 Posts
I've always gone to Michelin's when the stock tires need to be replaced, and have never had a complaint.
We are currently at just over 115,000 km with the ones on there now. We had to replace one 2 weeks ago, becasue some bozo doesn't like Honda's (one of the perils of living in a Ford Union town), and stuck a screw in my pass. rear tire. The shop didn't even 'recommend' replacing the pair, since there is still more than half the original tread left!

Btw...funny as it seems, but if you want a 'cheaper' set of 'Chinese' tires, come to Canada...we don't have an outrageous tariff against them here....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,181 Posts
On the first hand, if you buy specialty packages and high end stuff, you'd best be aware of the ongoing cost. Total cost of ownership is something you should keep aware of with anything you buy.

On the other hand, the number of people I see on the road with the $25/tire crap is astounding. You know, the specials with "tread pattern and/or brand may vary" on the billboards. I see them in the parking garage at work, 4 DIFFERENT no-name tires on them. Seems to be mostly cheap SUV's and minivans. I don't know why people take their safety so nonchalantly. Are tires normally considered not part of safety equipment in peoples' minds? :confused:



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,214 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Just be glad you don't ride a sporty motorcycle. Today's "Sport Bike Tires" only last 3,000 - 5,000 miles. Even the "Sport-Touring Tires" I use on my modest bike (Kawasaki ZR-7S) can rarely see 10,000 miles.

Granted, they are sticky, provide great traction and inspire confidence. Although at $130 - $200 per rear tire.... that kind of confidence does not come cheap....

The WSJ reader comments are as interesting as the article and motorcycle tires are discussed. One of the readers contends that there has also been wheel-size inflation in the consumer motorcycle world in the past twenty years.

I definitely would not be skimping on tires on a two-wheel vehicle.






 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Just be glad you don't ride a sporty motorcycle. Today's "Sport Bike Tires" only last 3,000 - 5,000 miles. Even the "Sport-Touring Tires" I use on my modest bike (Kawasaki ZR-7S) can rarely see 10,000 miles.

Granted, they are sticky, provide great traction and inspire confidence. Although at $130 - $200 per rear tire.... that kind of confidence does not come cheap....
At least there's only 2 ! :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,645 Posts
many of the "sport packages" include "summer tires."

Kinda funny watching a brand new Acura with the factory wheel/suspension upgrade slither and slide on a road with a light coating of snow, while a crappy old mini-van with cheapy Chinese no-name all season tires cruises right on past it.

Easy solution....winter tires...and wheels....and TPMS "adjustments."

ka-ching.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,181 Posts
many of the "sport packages" include "summer tires."

Kinda funny watching a brand new Acura with the factory wheel/suspension upgrade slither and slide on a road with a light coating of snow, while a crappy old mini-van with cheapy Chinese no-name all season tires cruises right on past it.

Easy solution....winter tires...and wheels....and TPMS "adjustments."

ka-ching.
Hard solution: somehow make it so people's eyes aren't bigger than their pocketbooks :lol:



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,390 Posts
At least there's only 2 ! :lol:
...BUT, they need replacing MUCH more frequently...

I did go through all the numbers with one of my employees who is riding a Triumph Speed Triple to work ~170miles a day round trip.

Bottomline: It cost double with 10x the risk of accidental death compared to be driving a Honda Civic EX.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,390 Posts
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top