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Seem very expensive to pay $867.28 for Toyo Open Country H/T 60,000 mi. $184.07 per tire,
$14.50 for balance each,
$13.75 each for siping and
$4.50 each for tubeless valve stem

Don't know if I should buy them online cheaper or go somewhere else?

I have always trusted that "Les" was always around when I got a flat for some reason and they are everywhere:!:
 

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Seem very expensive to pay $867.28 for Toyo Open Country H/T 60,000 mi. $184.07 per tire,
$14.50 for balance each,
$13.75 each for siping and
$4.50 each for tubeless valve stem

Don't know if I should buy them online cheaper or go somewhere else?

I have always trusted that "Les" was always around when I got a flat for some reason and they are everywhere:!:
Hmmm...maybe a question is, would you go somewhere else to buy them more expensive?! lol Sorry, maybe smarta$$ answer (plus I have no idea who Les is).

Maybe I missed it but, what size tire did you price?

Many times (if not all?), buying online then choosing shop for install can provide an easy way to save $$$ just by avoiding taxes, plus finding a shop that doesn't surcharge for TPMS, 60's and below, etc (again, not sure your tire size). Plus, you may be able to ship the tires directly to shop (e.g., tirerack), so you don't even have to deal with logistics of getting tires to the shop. When I was pricing tires, my local discounttire shop surcharged for all that stuff which added another $100+ to the bill (AFTER pricing both tires online and installation!). Yes, you may lose lifetime tire rotations by not buying/installing tires at same place but, how long will you have the tires and how often will you rotate them...and how much is it worth to lessen the $$ load upfront vs. paying the $35-$40 sporadically for rotations. For me, I'll deal with the rotations when the time comes. For you/someone else, maybe just the opposite...JMHO :)
 

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Seem very expensive to pay $867.28 for Toyo Open Country H/T 60,000 mi. $184.07 per tire,
$14.50 for balance each,
$13.75 each for siping and
$4.50 each for tubeless valve stem

Don't know if I should buy them online cheaper or go somewhere else?

I have always trusted that "Les" was always around when I got a flat for some reason and they are everywhere:!:
for that price,,you may as well get michelin ltx m/s
 

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I just went into Les Schwab today to check on prices for my E and they quoted me $928.97 out the door for a set of these same Toyo Open Country H/Ts...ouch! First off, what is siping and is it really something worth $55 on a new set of tires? The guy explained it to me but it reeks of some gimmick to tack on $55 to my purchase.

I too have always been pretty loyal to Les Schwab since they are everywhere in the west and have made good on free road hazard replacements a couple times for me in the past when I've been on the road out of town, plus at least in the past they were cheaper than elsewhere when I shopped around...but $930 for a set of highway tires for my E? Sheesh, I might expect to pay that kind of price for a set of 10+ ply tires for some big 4WD truck but that is way over what I had hoped I'd be paying for a new set of skins. The guy mentioned that I could lok at different tire sizes and would probably find some better deals (he mentioned that the size I have on there - 215-70-16) run expensive for tires. I don't know much about tires - obviously I have to stick with the rim size but otherwise how flexible can I be with tires? What kind of prices are folks paying for reasonable quality highway tires for their E's? Am I correct that this price is astronomical?
 

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Siping is basically turning the tire like you turn wood on a lathe. The reason for this was originally if you had an oversize tire and you would shave the edge of the tire to fit within your fender well to all for an even larger oversize.

It has since been expanded to shops adding additional water channels in tires, etc. It died out with the exception of the 4x4 applications but had a resurgence about 12 years ago or something as a way for the local tire places to make some money.

If you buy the proper size tire for your Element siping is not necessary and will provide no advantage to you or for you.
 

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Siping is basically turning the tire like you turn wood on a lathe. The reason for this was originally if you had an oversize tire and you would shave the edge of the tire to fit within your fender well to all for an even larger oversize.

It has since been expanded to shops adding additional water channels in tires, etc. It died out with the exception of the 4x4 applications but had a resurgence about 12 years ago or something as a way for the local tire places to make some money.

If you buy the proper size tire for your Element siping is not necessary and will provide no advantage to you or for you.
Good to know - thanks. I was leery as I figured if the tires needed the extra grooves, why wouldn't they have been designed that way. THe sales pitch was pretty aggressive, which also made me suspect. Seemed like a way to tack on $60 to the set of already rather expensive tires.
 

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Toyo Open Country H/T's

Replacing a set of BFG Long Trail T/A/s Only baout 600 miles on them so far, but quite a difference. Handling is much better, quieter, rain handling was much improved.

Soon we'll find out about snow..

$722 for 4 installed.

Got about 55000 miles out of the BFG's.
 

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replaced Toyo Open Country H/Ts with Bridgestone Ecopia's at Costco

I just replaced the Toyo Open Country H/Ts which did last 50k. They were fine but was not in love with them.

I just put on the Bridgestone 422 Ecopia's from Costco. First impression, badass. They are super quiet and look good. I only have about 100 miles on them so far. In theory you get 1 to 2% better gas mileage out of them, over the life of the tire that is about $500, so Bridgestone says. My aunt just had Ecopias put on her Prius after a short stint with other tires. That short stint, her mileage did drop about about 4mpg. So, with Ecopias, went back up again.

Price for the set, with $100 off coupon. $527.

While Schwab has good service, they are expensive and not a fan of Toyo's overall, but they were brand new when I bought my E. And, yes, Schwab has to pay for that good service somehow, hence their prices are high.

Ecopia 422's are sold through Costco and they have a $100 deal until end of November (although it could be extended to mid-December).

See attached photo for how they look.

-- Justin
 

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Early update on the Toyo's

With about 850 miles on them so far, I've noticed about a 2mpg drop in fuel efficiency. I was getting about 25.6 overall and with 3 tanks since installing the Toyo's and about 23.5 afterwards.

About an 8% drop.. that will add up over 50,000 miles..

Still like the handling and stopping though.
 
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